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ePub The Aztec Love God download

by Tony Diaz

ePub The Aztec Love God download
Author:
Tony Diaz
ISBN13:
978-1573660365
ISBN:
1573660361
Language:
Publisher:
Fiction Collective 2; 1st edition (May 30, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
United States
ePub file:
1832 kb
Fb2 file:
1541 kb
Other formats:
lit azw mobi txt
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
670

I met Tony Diaz at a lit festival this fall-it was the coolest experience.

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). I met Tony Diaz at a lit festival this fall-it was the coolest experience. From his colorful descriptions of the world around him to his staccato burst of comedy from his "joke scrapbook"-it's all a strong and unyielding voice.

The Aztec Love God book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Aztec Love God. by. Tony Diaz. The Aztec Love God is a dark comedy about Tiofilio Duarte's climb to obscurity.

Author of the novel THE AZTEC LOVE GOD. Included in several anthologies such as; HECHO EN TEJAS: an anthology of Texas Mexican Writers

Lone Star College-North Harris. Author of the novel THE AZTEC LOVE GOD. Included in several anthologies such as; HECHO EN TEJAS: an anthology of Texas Mexican Writers. Just completed 2nd novel THE CHILDREN OF THE LOCUST TREE.

He lives in Houston and teaches at Houston Community College. SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY: Latino Heretics (1999) The Aztec Love God (1998).

Writer, activist, and professor Tony Diaz, El Librotraficante, was the first Chicano to earn a Master of Fine . He wrote the novel The Aztec Love God and is included in "Hecho En Tejas: The Anthology of Texas Mexican Writers".

Writer, activist, and professor Tony Diaz, El Librotraficante, was the first Chicano to earn a Master of Fine Arts Degree from the University of Houston Creative Writing Program. He earned his bachelor's degree in Communications from De Paul University in Chicago. Diaz is currently a professor of Mexican American Literature and Rhetorical Analysis in Houston, Texas. He recently launched the column The Cultural Accelerator to address issues that other publications don’t address in a unique style and point of view.

My first book is titled THE AZTEC LOVE GOD. I just finished my 2nd novel. It's titled THE CHILDREN OF THE LOCUST TREE. My agent is Rene Alegria. Expect me to engender scandals and rivalries to incite book sales once it's released.

In brief: Tio is a teenager living with his parents in Chicago. Antonio Marquez is an average high school student waiting to graduate. D" is another student in the same high school quietly leading an affirmative-action revolution under the teachers' noses. Houston author Tony Diaz's debut novel, The Aztec love god, is a book about identities - how they are created, nurtured, discovered, and discarded. Tiofilio (if that is his real name) is the narrator of the story, those others his creations, versions of himself discovered as the need, as the desire, arose.

The Aztec Love God is a dark comedy about Tiofilio Duarte's climb to obscurity. I had heard about Tony Diaz and THE AZTEC LOVE GOD through the writing group Nuestra Palabra: Latino Writers Having Their Say, which he is the founder of in Houston, Texas

I had heard about Tony Diaz and THE AZTEC LOVE GOD through the writing group Nuestra Palabra: Latino Writers Having Their Say, which he is the founder of in Houston, Texas. So I went to check it out, and I also read the book. THE AZTEC LOVE GOD is cutting edge, and is changing what is expected of Latino Literature. The book is hilarious, but also very wild, and also experimental.

Writer, activist, and professor Tony Diaz Diaz, El Librotraficante, was the first Chicano .

Writer, activist, and professor Tony Diaz Diaz, El Librotraficante, was the first Chicano to earn an MFA from the University of Houston Creative Writing Program. His essays have appeared in the Houston Chronicle, Texas Observer, CN. om, the Los Angeles Times, and Huffington Post Latino Voices, & other publications. He just finished writing the textbook "The Mexican American Studies Toolkit" (ww. heMASToolkit.

Tlaloc was an important deity in Aztec religion, a god of rain, fertility, and water. He was a beneficent god who gave life and sustenance, but he was also feared for his ability to send hail, thunder and lightning, and for being the lord of the powerful element of water

Tlaloc was an important deity in Aztec religion, a god of rain, fertility, and water. He was a beneficent god who gave life and sustenance, but he was also feared for his ability to send hail, thunder and lightning, and for being the lord of the powerful element of water. In Aztec iconography he is normally depicted with goggle eyes and fangs. He was associated with caves, springs and mountains.

The Aztec Love God is a dark comedy about Tiofilio Duarte's climb to obscurity. Originally, young Tio wanted to perfect the comic role of the Aztec Love God, his ideal persona. Along the way, he meets Jester, an older, Caucasian comedian who makes Tio an offer he's like to refuse. Jester offers Tio an opportunity to join his act. The only condition is that he, Tio has to perform Latino stereotypes. Tio has to decide if he is going to take the blank check for easy thoughts or develop The Aztec Love God on his own.

The Aztec Love God combines humor, politics, and street knowledge. Diaz comes at the reader from all angles. His mixture of styles and influences pushes The Aztec Love God to a multi-multiculturalism.

The Aztec Love God is a vato but not too loco.

  • The Aztec Love God is an experimental text. It is one that does not invest in the style of the Chicanos of the 1970s, nor of the high brows of New York. It is a book about a young Latino coming of age even when challenged to go down the easy road. Durante the comic, encounters Lester, a would-be manager, who only sees Durante in terms of a stereotype. Durante has to decide which road he should travel, and then, look toward a past that has never really been explained to him. To read the text, one most getting ready to laugh, then think. It is not an airport novel, nor a romance. It is a dose of reality, con un poco humor.

  • I had heard about Tony Diaz and THE AZTEC LOVE GOD through the writing group Nuestra Palabra: Latino Writers Having Their Say, which he is the founder of in Houston, Texas. So I went to check it out, and I also read the book. I think they are both alike and linked. THE AZTEC LOVE GOD is cutting edge, and is changing what is expected of Latino Literature. The book is hilarious, but also very wild, and also experimental. On one level, you will laugh out loud at some of the things in the book, the comedy, the situations. The main character Tiofilio Duarte is very funny. It is so funny, and so crazy at times with its form and style that you might miss how deep the book is. It really does take a hard long look at what it means to be an American, what it means to be an artist, how tough and how smart you have to be to survive in this day and age. It will challenge and change what you think of as art, literature, and identity. This is what Diaz does not only with his writing but with Nuestra Palabra: Latino Writers Having Their Say.

  • I met Tony Diaz at a lit festival this fall--it was the coolest experience. Here's the review I wrote for my local newspaper:
    His words jump off the page and grab you by the throat. From his colorful descriptions of the world around him to his staccato burst of comedy from his "joke scrapbook"-it's all a strong and unyielding voice. With the constant struggle with his life and his identity, the novel is still relentless and uncompromising in its abundant comedy.
    High school student and aspiring comedian Tio Duarte is the novel's narrator and main character. He struggles throughout the novel, literally, with his name. No one calls him by his name: his father calls him "Junior"; his girlfriend Rosie and secret lover Farah call him "sweetie"; his manager calls him "T-O;" his adversary Principal Autruck calls him "Marquez." Intelligent enough to take entrance exams for others, Tio makes money by falsifying documents, as well his own identity. This allows him to create several monikers-and a quick exit if things go awry.
    There's Antonio Marquez, the average high school student months away from graduation. There's "D," his rebellious high school alter ego who leads an affirmative action group called MALO (Mexican-American Leadership Organization), which does more stealing and selling of examinations than anything else. There's his "over 21" personality, Lorenzo Cassanova, who easily weaves in an out of nightclubs-he's a smooth talker who's having an affair with Jester's exotic dancer girlfriend.
    Most important to the novel are his on-stage personalities. An aspiring comedian, Tio starts the novel trying to perfect his comic role of The Aztec Love God. Jester, and old, bald comedic manager offers to take Tio under his wing. There's one condition-has to ditch his The Aztec Love God act. So he does, offering the club audiences a little more comfortable, and funny, Latino stereotype.
    One of the main questions the novel presents is whether or not Tio will break out of the traditional -both on stage, and with his own life. In order to do that, he has to take control. Jester tells him which direction to take his comedy. His girlfriend Rosie announces Tio's non-existent marriage proposal, and even purchases the ring he'll give her; Rosie and Tio's father haggle over their finances, their wedding and their entire life.
    Tio openly despises his father who disregards his comedic aspirations. Once made rich by a "lottery," his father speaks in broken English and goes through the daily motions although he has no job to go to after reading the morning paper. Tio is especially peeved that his father won't help him financially, blowing his college fund on what he believes to be the original "Leave It To Beaver" set house. In his life, and in his act, it becomes the hilarious Mexican version, "Leave It To Burro."
    With Tio's attitude toward him, it's ironic that his father worked for years as an el peladito, a stock Mexican vaudeville character who was part wise man, part fool, part jester, part clown and all underdog. Tio, like his father before him, is becoming a Latino caricature, scrapping the true Aztec Love God for stereotypes like Jester's conception"Hoe-say" Valdez, Jr. (son of the ubiquitous coffee bean picker, Juan). With the big laughs he gets from making fun of his father through "Hoe-say," Tio gives himself a shot at a big career--maybe his own sitcom. But does he want his life to become "Leave it to Burro"? It's a question that looms throughout the novel, even through all the abundant humor. Through all the hijinks and drama, the funniest and most interesting act would be if he told the people in the nightclubs about his own life. Maybe we're the audience, getting the most compelling stand up routine there is. Maybe we're getting The Aztec Love God.
    In the end, the novel leaves us guessing. With his identities crumbling and the authorities (his family, his school, and the actual police) closing in, Tio is forced to pick one identity to get him out of his accumulating problems. Is this his one true identity or another concoction to help him sneak his way out of trouble? You'll have to see for yourself by reading The Aztec Love God.
    The Aztec Love God is a must-read--unless you dislike laughing, thinking, and reading the emerging and exciting voice of Tony Diaz.