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ePub The Labrys Reunion download

by Terry Wolverton

ePub The Labrys Reunion download
Author:
Terry Wolverton
ISBN13:
978-1935226024
ISBN:
1935226029
Language:
Publisher:
Spinsters Ink (August 25, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
United States
ePub file:
1670 kb
Fb2 file:
1709 kb
Other formats:
rtf azw mbr docx
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
502

The Labrys Reunion book. As always, Wolverton's writing is compelling and surefooted, which helped me distinguish between the many characters and interpretations of feminism that populate this novel.

The Labrys Reunion book.

Her book Insurgent Muse: Life and Art at the Woman's Building, a memoir published in 2002 by City Lights Books, was named one of the "Best Books of 2002" by the Los Angeles Times, and was the winner of the 2003 Publishing Triangle Judy Grahn Award, and a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award. Her novel-in-poems Embers was a finalist for the PEN USA Litfest Poetry Award and the Lambda Book Award.

by Terry Wolverton (Author). Wolverton has always had a knack for filling in very specific real details that nuance a character's life. I have both the actual book and the kindle book too. I have listened to the kindle version read to me by my kindle as this book is text to speech enabled. The story takes place in New York City and it is fascinating. There are many complicated and interesting characters that you won't soon forget. They really conflicted with each other, and their agendas shown through in each scene.

Midway, FL: Spinsters Ink Books, 2009.

Woverton was born in Cocoa Beach, Florida, and grew up in Detroit, Michigan. Midway, FL: Spinsters Ink Books, 2009. Midway, FL: Spinsters Ink Books, 2011. Insurgent Muse: Life and Art at the Woman’s Building. San Francisco: City Lights, 2002.

New York performance artist Gwen Kubacky thinks no one cares about feminist art anymore, until young art student Emma Firestein approaches her to become a mentor. Gwen agrees, hoping this legacy can be passed on to a new generation. As it happens Emma’s mother, Dana Firestein, is a woman who co-founded a legendary radical feminist school in the 1970s-Labrys-which Gwen attended. Gwen’s tutelage of Emma has barely begun when the young woman is raped and murdered during a night out clubbing.

Her novels include The Labrys Reunion (2009) and Bailey’s Beads (1996).

She was educated at the University of Detroit, the University of Toronto, Thomas Jefferson College, and the Sagaris Collective in Plainsfield, Vermont. Her novels include The Labrys Reunion (2009) and Bailey’s Beads (1996). Her memoir, Insurgent Muse: Life and Art at the Woman’s Building (2002), was chosen as one of the Best Books of the Year by the Los Angeles Times, won the Judy Grahn Award from Publishing Triangle, and was a finalist for the Lambda Book Award.

Even as a child Wolverton was interested in the arts, especially writing, music, and drama; she graduated from the Performing Arts curriculum of

The Labrys Reunion 1986-2007. Includes 3 CDs and 2 DVDs of readings by Terry Wolverton at such events as AULA, UCLA, the Woman's Building, and Books and Beyond. box 82, folder 4-5. "Trouble" manuscript 2003-2005. box 105, folder 1-10, box 106, folder 1-12, box 115, folder 8, box 116, folder 1-3. Writing business and public relations 1987-2014.

Her book Insurgent Muse: Life and art at the Woman’s Building, a memoir published in 2002 by City Lights Books, was named one of the Best Books of 2002 by the Los Angeles Times, and was the winner of the 2003 Publishing Triangle Judy Grahn Award, and a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award.

New York performance artist Gwen Kubacky thinks no one cares about feminist art anymore, until young art student Emma Firestein approaches her to become a mentor. Gwen agrees, hoping this legacy can be passed on to a new generation. As it happens Emma's mother, Dana Firestein, is a woman who co-founded a legendary radical feminist school in the 1970s--Labrys--which Gwen attended. Gwen's tutelage of Emma has barely begun when the young woman is raped and murdered during a night out clubbing. Dana's comrades rally from far and near, as do friends of Emma's, and they gather in the only possible space, Gwen's warehouse loft. The young women disdain the judgmental old fossils they're cooped up with. And to the women of Labrys, this alien new generation, with its ignorance of its radical roots and birth in feminism, appears ungrateful if not worthless. But heretical challenges to old beliefs surface among Dana's contemporaries, as do truths long held secret. And among the younger women are those who possess more than enough rage and radical belief to take action to avenge Emma's murder.
  • I have both the actual book and the kindle book too. I have listened to the kindle version read to me by my kindle as this book is text to speech enabled. The story takes place in New York City and it is fascinating. There are many complicated and interesting characters that you won't soon forget. The dynamics between women of different generations and identifications (butch.femme,queer and more)are interesting and tension filled.
    If you have lived through the Lesbian and Feminist Women's Movement or if you'd like to know more about it, this is a good way to review or experience it.
    This book is great for anyone who loves good writing and a unique story with multi-dimensional characters. I have never read anything quite like it.

  • From the vantage point of a couple of decades later, it's easy to see how an idealistic educational institute/think tank/summer camp for feminists might spark some, well, drama. But for the women who gathered at Labrys in the '70s, hopes and stakes were high. When the murder of one of their daughters prompts the reunion of the title, they gather as a much warier bunch--not just of each other, but of the murdered girl's Gen X friends, a mix of apparent slackers, gender-benders and loose cannons.

    As always, Wolverton's writing is compelling and surefooted, which helped me distinguish between the many characters and interpretations of feminism that populate this novel. Ultimately, I was most moved by protagonist Gwen's realization that feminism's imperfection is a product of its success: "She had continued to see this movement as an elaborate drama in which the women of the world were happily and purposefully engaged in a bloodless revolution.... How had she managed all these years to avoid that simple truth, that taking power had consequences?" Some good consequences, some bad, all worth reading about.

  • I enjoyed The Labrys Reunion. Thank you, Terry, for writing this and giving this insight into feminist activism and politics. I thought the characters were really well-developed. I loved the detail about each of them. Wolverton has always had a knack for filling in very specific real details that nuance a character's life. They really conflicted with each other, and their agendas shown through in each scene. I like the way the overarching question of what happened to these people and their cause overlays the whole story. And how the story moved right along. The ending was very exciting and to the point, very effective. Wolverton has a strong ability to structure a scene so that there is conflict, and she brings the reader in and up-to-date in a very no-nonsense way.

    I have to say that there was a line that just floored me. "She could never understand how the daughters of moon travelers could be content to explore no further than their own scraps of ground." It is a stunning statement that sums up the whole generational problem. What a great writer Wolverton is. Give us more!!

  • I just finished reading this novel that really showcases the lesbian/feminist/queer generational divide -- 70s vs. 90s mostly. It's hard to review because it is a hard book. It's not hard to read -- the grammar and the verbiage are very accessible. The emotions of the characters are very hard, very angry, very at-cross purposes much of the time. The central event around which all these women have come together is the murder of a young female art student, Emma, the bisexual daughter of Dana Firestein, one of the women of a 70s organization, Labrys. The primary point of view -- though it goes through many of the women's point of view -- is Gwen Kubacky, the art student's mentor (just prior to her death).

    The conflict in this story is almost purely between the two generations - though there are still some intragenerational conflicts between the older women who all had different ideas what Labrys was and could do, or grow into, as a feminist organization of the 1970s. I was born just as the 70s were beginning, so I'm right smack between the two generations being depicted, which certainly made this book more an observation, than me reliving some aspect of my own history. There were a few characters who clearly were brought in because of their representation of different aspects of the 1970s feminists and queer community, but who themselves didn't do much more than fill out the room of mourners - Elena Martinez, the powerful political broker, for example. But it is all to paint the various differences between the generations of women.

    I could only absorb The Labrys Reunion in a couple chapter doses at a time. I'm glad I did though. It really did a good job telling the central story of women responding to a death among their own - whether distantly or intimately connected to that person. If not everyone grows as a result of the encounter, that may be less the author's fault and simply demonstrate the faults of the characters.

    The details of the New York City scenes were so real I could almost smell and feel the places around me. But it was a real kick in the teeth as I was faced with character after character facing how hard it is to communicate effectively between groups of people who have different experiences. I felt "accused" for this breakdown, and then almost commanded, certainly compelled, to do something to fix it. And I'm not even really represented by a character in the book. For someone who might see herself in one of the characters it's gonna be a real tough book to digest.

    But an extremely rewarding one. Reunions are about going back and seeing where you've come from. In The Labrys Reunion, Terry Wolverton points out the many miles we still have to go, even to connect within and among ourselves.

    Review by Lara Zielinsky
    © January 2010

  • I adore this book. this is the *only* book I have ever read aloud (my wife and I read it aloud to each other)--it was suspenseful, loving, and courageous. I don't imagine I will read aloud a whole book again with my wife...! we wouldn't let the other go forward into the book alone-- there are not that many books that you can read aloud and be that interested in...this is one of them! it is a beautiful memory --our time of doing that and I loved the story of feminist factions weaving and colliding-- I've experienced that in my own life history. Wolverton's writing is authentic. she writes from the heart and also from a place of true "herstory."