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ePub Walking into the Night: A Novel download

by Olaf Olafsson

ePub Walking into the Night: A Novel download
Author:
Olaf Olafsson
ISBN13:
978-0375422546
ISBN:
0375422544
Language:
Publisher:
Pantheon; New Ed edition (October 28, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
United States
ePub file:
1186 kb
Fb2 file:
1705 kb
Other formats:
rtf txt doc docx
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
268

Acclaim for Olaf Olafsson’s Walking into the Night. Walking Into the Night. The Journey Home: A Novel.

Acclaim for Olaf Olafsson’s Walking into the Night. Olafsson is a gifted dramatist. Olafsson delivers the story like our minds deliver memory-in stretches of calm, in flashes of intensity, with jagged edges of remorse, in self-protective remove. We turn the pages because we are entranced by the pristine quality of the prose.

Walking Into the Night book. Walking into the Night is a novel about love and loss in the wake of terrible decisions. Olaf Olafsson surpasses anything he has accomplished thus far in this wise and beautiful novel. Kristjan Benediktsson is a father and a husband of four children in Iceland when on a business tirp to New York (circa World War I) he falls in love with an actress and his life changes.

Author Olaf Olafsson. Books by Olaf Olafsson: Walking Into the Night. 10 3. 10.

Walking Into the Night. As butler to William Randolph Hearst at San Simeon castle, Christian Benediktsson lives quietly, almost invisibly. He completes his tasks efficiently and with aplomb, catering to the whims of the volatile Chief and overseeing the running of the hectic household. Privy to the goings-on of the celebrity guests who visit as well as to Hearst's intimate relationship with his mistress, the actress Marion Davies, he is the picture of discretion. A lyrical and arresting novel by acclaimed Icelandic writer Olaf Olafsson about one woman's redemptive journey home.

Walking into the Night is your third novel, and a bit of a commercial departure from your previous novels

Walking into the Night is your third novel, and a bit of a commercial departure from your previous novels.

Walking into the Night is a novel from Olaf Olafsson about a man’s hidden past and the immutability of love and loss. For twenty years Christian Benediktsson has led a quiet life as the butler to William Randolph Hearst, the greatest newspaper magnate in the world. His days are filled with the rituals of Hearst’s life and the demands of running a grand household

20 April 2014 ·. Olaf Olafsson. Based on the novel by Olaf Olafsson, VALENTINES is a white-knuckled emotional journey, capturing the most candid of moments between lovers when unspoken truths and long buried secrets surge to the surface and everything changes in an instant.

Olaf Olafsson was born in Reykjavik, Iceland, in 1962. He studied physics as a Wien scholar at Brandeis University. He is the author of five previous novels, The Journey Home, Absolution, Walking into the Night, Restoration, and One Station Away, and a story collection, Valentines

Olaf Olafsson was born in Reykjavik, Iceland, in 1962. He is the author of five previous novels, The Journey Home, Absolution, Walking into the Night, Restoration, and One Station Away, and a story collection, Valentines. He is executive vice president of Time Warner and lives in New York City with his wife and three children. Библиографические данные. Restoration: A Novel. by. Ólafur Jóhann Ólafsson. New York : Pantheon Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

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From the acclaimed author of The Journey Home, a new novel of tremendous power and beauty about a man’s hidden past and about the immutability of love and loss.For twenty years Christian Benediktsson has led a quiet life as William Randolph Hearst’s butler. His days are filled with the rituals of Hearst’s life and the demands of running a grand house. But in his most private thoughts and memories, he relives another life: his abandonment of his wife and children in Iceland for an actress in New York, a reckless affair and a tragic death, financial downfall, and the profound retreat from life that led him to Hearst’s San Simeon. No one else knows the secret of the man he once was—husband, father, businessman, lover—and, ultimately, even he will choose to forget that this person ever existed. Walking into the Night is a stunning portrait of a man wrestling with guilt and secret passions. Olaf Olafsson surpasses anything he has accomplished thus far in this wise and beautiful novel.
  • Since reading the author's brilliant The Journey Home, I've wanted to read more from him; this was no disappointment. Again we have an unapologetic person examining long-ago decisions. Christian is not a likeable man; he has left his wife and children in Iceland and come to the US for the love of an exotic dancer, an equally unlikeable character. Left alone, he finds his solace at San Simeon, running the estate of another unlikeable character: William Randolph Hearst. With no one around to win Ms/Mr Congeniality, Olafsson pins his story on connecting the threads between past and present while juxtaposing two men of similar self-interest, whether they are building a business, jettisoning a family, or blind to all but a woman. Of course, if one has money, one is merely eccentric; without funds, one is an outcast.

  • Found this a bit scattered and weird. No exciting disclosures from San Simeon. Heard his other books are much bettet.

  • Love it. Moving, interesting, charming in a quiet & understated kind of way. Olaf Olafsson is one of my favorite authors.

  • The author is a poet telling a good story. A delightful reading, just as good as his other books ( I have read them all ).
    A must.

  • This book was a good read and I learned a lot about Iceland and the Hearsts.. I have enjoyed all of the books I have read by this author..

  • Admittedly a slow novel, the tension does begin to increase towards the end as readers want to know if Christian Benediktsson will indeed send to his wife the accumulation of letters he has written her to explain and at times justify his actions.

    I was too much influenced by Citizen Kane as I read the novel, particularly when it came to Hearst's determination to fire any worker who dared to pluck a rose from his bushes. When one worker does, and Christian attempts to protect him, Hearst is determined to fire Benediktsson for his deceit. Hearst's determination to do so passes, but during that particular episode, I could not help but think of Kane's fixation on Rosebud. Whether or not Olafsson meant for readers to make such an association I don't know.

    What I appreciated about this novel was the unsettled and at times tortured nature of the kind of man--in this case Benediktsson-- who would walk out on his wife and four children. While this plot is commonplace in fiction and film, I am not used to writers or film makers offering the audience the internal thinking and agonies of such a man. Benediktsson's letters to Elisabet and his attempts to distract himself from the shadows of his soul do offer readers a realistic perspective of what might occur for a man in this situation.

  • Christian Benediktson, the butler of William Randolph Hearst at his castle in San Simeon, is a man of mystery. He's quiet, unassuming, and intensely private, revealing himself to readers thru bits and pieces revealed in a series of letters to the wife he abandoned years ago. These letters accumulate in his desk drawer at the Hearst home. There are other chapters, some told in 1st person, some told in omniscient 3rd person, a few in the point of view of other characters, that round out the story of Christian's complicated past lives in Iceland and New York. It is frequently difficult for readers, at the beginning of some of these chapters to tell exactly who is speaking and what point in time is being related. While this is initially confusing, it adds, ultimately, to the mesmerizing, dream-like quality that allows readers to feel they are being carried along, floated along, on the sad, guilt-ridden narrative.
    Very loosely based (via a series of journals and letters that came into the author's possession) on Hearst's real-life butler, the story is peopled with real people and narrates real events in their lives, all seen thru the remorseful eyes of the butler.
    Excellent, excellent, excellent...

  • The writing is crafted, but I walked away in the end feeling the story had no impact. It tries to be one of those deep, convoluted confessions from unreliable first-person narrators. However, the central suspense, when it is revealed, hardly means anything at all. Actually, I suppose it means something to the narrator because that is his life, but it is nothing new in storytelling.

    A worthwhile book might tell an old story in a new way or tell a new story in old language. This book does neither, but dresses its failure in literary language and staged sadness to trick readers. The content was sparse and countless paragraphs were just filler descriptions to make it book-sized. Comparing it to Kazuo Ishiguro's sublime "The Remains of the Day" is a shameless marketing ploy; just read Kazuo Ishiguro instead.