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by Virginia Woolf

ePub Modern Classics Room of Ones Own (Penguin Modern Classics) download
Author:
Virginia Woolf
ISBN13:
978-0141183534
ISBN:
0141183535
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Classic; New Ed edition (March 5, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
United States
ePub file:
1535 kb
Fb2 file:
1761 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
209

A Room of One's Own, based on a lecture given at Girton College, Cambridge, is one of the great feminist polemics, ranging in its themes from Jane Austen and Carlotte Brontë to the silent fate of Shakespeare's gifted (imaginary) sister and the effects of poverty and sexual constraint on female creativity. See all Product description. Customers who bought this item also bought.

That’s where Modern Classics come in. Since 1961 they have been an organic, ever-growing and ever-evolving list of books that we believe will continue to be. . Since 1961 they have been an organic, ever-growing and ever-evolving list of books that we believe will continue to be read over and over again. They will be summarily deleted.

Penguin Books Ltd. Серия: Modern Classics . Speak, Memory was first published in 1951 as Conclusive Evidence and then assiduously revised and republished in 1966 under the title Speak Memory, an Autobiography Revisited.

Penguin Modern Classics. 1117 books in this series. A Room of One's Own. Virginia Woolf. The Looking Glass War. John le Carré. Choose 3 timeless classics for only £20 over on the Penguin Shop. The Spy Who Came in from the Cold.

A Room of One's Own", based on a lecture given at Girton College Cambridge, is one of the great feminist polemics. Woolf's blazing polemic on female creativity, the role of the writer, and the silent fate of Shakespeare's imaginary sister remains a powe. A Room of One's Own", based on a lecture given at Girton College Cambridge, is one of the great feminist polemics. Woolf's blazing polemic on female creativity, the role of the writer, and the silent fate of Shakespeare's imaginary sister remains a powerful reminder of a woman's need for financial independence and intellectual freedom. ru 770. Похожие книги: Room of One?s Own.

A Room of One's Own, based on a lecture given at Girton College Cambridge, is one of the great feminist polemics

A Room of One's Own, based on a lecture given at Girton College Cambridge, is one of the great feminist polemics.

A Room of One's Own. Tess of the D'Urbervilles.

Laurie Lee. Childhood. The Memoir of an Anti-Hero. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.

Collecting two book-length essays, A Room of One's Own and Three Guineas is Virginia Woolf's most p.

A Room of One's Own, based on a lecture given at Girton College, Cambridge, is one of the great feminist polemics, ranging in its themes from Jane Austen and Carlotte Brontë to the silent fate of Shakespeare's gifted (imaginary) sister and the effects of poverty and sexual constraint on female creativity. Collecting two book-length essays, A Room of One's Own and Three Guineas is Virginia Woolf's most p.

A Room of One's Own is an extended essay by. First published during 24 October 1929, it was based on a series of. First published during 24 October 1929, it was based on a series of lectures she delivered at Newnham College and Girton College, two women's colleges at Cambridge University in October 1928. In one section, Woolf invented a fictional character Judith "Shakespeare's Sister", to illustrate that a woman with Shakespeare's gifts would have been denied the same opportunities to develop them because of the doors that were closed to women. Woolf also examines the careers of several female authors, including Aphra Behn, Jane Austen, the Brontë sisters and George Eliot.

Collecting two book-length essays, A Room of One's Own and Three Guineas is Virginia Woolf's most powerful feminist writing, justifying the need for women to possess intellectual freedom and financial independence. This Penguin Modern Classics edition is edited with an introduction and notes by Michele Barrett. A Room of One's Own, based on a lecture given at Girton College, Cambridge, is one of the great feminist polemics, ranging in its themes from Jane Austen and Carlotte Brontë to the silent fate of Shakespeare's gifted (imaginary) sister and the effects of poverty and sexual constraint on female creativity. Three Guineas was published almost a decade later and breaks new ground in its discussion of men, militarism and women's attitudes towards war. These two pieces reveal Virginia Woolf's fiery spirit and sophisticated wit, and confirm her status as a highly inspirational essayist. Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) is regarded as a major 20th century author and essayist, a key figure in literary history as a feminist and modernist, and the centre of 'The Bloomsbury Group'. This informal collective of artists and writers which included Lytton Strachey and Roger Fry, exerted a powerful influence over early twentieth-century British culture. Between 1925 and 1931 Virginia Woolf produced what are now regarded as her finest masterpieces, from Mrs Dalloway (1925) to the poetic and highly experimental novel The Waves (1931). She also maintained an astonishing output of literary criticism, short fiction, journalism and biography, including the playfully subversive Orlando (1928) and A Room of One's Own (1929) a passionate feminist essay. If you enjoyed A Room of One's Own, you might like Woolf's Orlando, also available in Penguin Modern Classics. 'Probably the most influential piece of non-fictional writing by a woman in this century' Hermione Lee, Financial Times
  • An essay written in the late 1920s about women's writing. Why wasn't Shakespeare a woman? Why did Jane Austen hide her manuscripts from guests? What makes good writing? What makes women's writing? Are a woman's sentences different from a man's sentences?

    This book is witty, from the first moment when the author tries to cross the lawn of an Oxbridge college and is stopped by a beadle because only the fellows and scholars (all male) are allowed here. Later she notes wryly that the few women's colleges have no such beadle, and none of the endowments of the men's colleges.

    What a woman needs in order to write is a room of one's own and five hundred pounds a year.

    When she wrote, women had only had the vote in Britain for less than a decade, and married women had only been allowed to own their own property for a bare forty years. Women's education is no longer the issue it was when the book was written and it is much easier today for a woman to be independent. Still, A Room of One's Own remains an entertaining read and the issues it raises are by no means resolved.

  • 100 years later, she still inspires great insights into the common heritage of women. In eloquent, often poetic language, mrs Woolf makes us see the world through the eyes of Shakespeare's sister. She makes us see how women's toil has barred women from participating in the learned world. We shall not excuse ourselves for producing our offspring, but with modernity comes the responsibility to seize the opportunity to be educated, writing, productive citizens in more than one way. We shall not let ourselves be ignored or set aside, because our experiences are no less important than those of men. And our experience is the source of a different writing than that of men. Thank you for making me proud of my gender.

  • A Room of One’s Own is of course canonical and hardly needs another recommendation. The almost flippant tone with which Wolff skewers male artistic superiority with arguments while simultaneously refuting the same idea with a style itself ingenious etches in one’s soul the plight of women in the early twentieth century.

    And, of course, the book is almost a victim of its own success. Few women in Western countries are now dissuaded from having an artistic career. The women’s movement has, so to speak, moved on to demands like equal pay.

    So I’ll merely point out one perspective which may have been overlooked by some readers. That is, that Woolf’s cause is completely centered around the problems of first world women. Basically, Woolf argues that women do not have the access to the wealth or education that men have and, as a result, have not produced an artistic genius like Shakespeare. Fair enough. But how many women in the period following the First World War were concerned about having an outlet for their creativity? Were not women in many parts of the world so bereft of even their natural human rights so as not to over worry about outlets for creativity?

    For all its indisputable genius, A Room of One’s Own then may arguably be charged with a mixed legacy. Yes, it highlighted the need for privileged women to be equals of men in their access to the fonts of creativity. But it also may have tended to direct feminism to a first world perspective leaving out the voices of billions of women who Woolf, for all her literary aplomb, does not seem overly concerned about, at least in this work.

    Literary classic? Undoubtedly. Mixed effect on the direction of twentieth century feminism? A distinct possibility.

  • I always forget how great Virginia Woolf's writing is. This is an essay noting the absence of women's writing voices throughout history and she makes note that women need a room of their own (which throughout history they have not had being forced to write in common rooms when they wrote) and independent means (which until very recent history women's income was claimed by their husband). Her point being that women need independence if they are to have an independent writing voice.

  • One of the best books I read in 2016.

    She should be one of the most humorous women in Britain at her time. It was supposed to be a speech. Putting a lot of discursive aside, her speech started with Women and Fiction and what she had experienced and what had inspired her about the topic she supposedly gave speech to Newham Girls College. Here main theme, "numerous generations of unsung unnoticed unjusted women paved the way for what women at her era could attain was remarkable, and the girls should fight and stand on their corpses' and souls' behalf", was so strong and so well versed.

  • Rating is for copy, not Woolf's story. This is not a real book. This copy is retyped in small font with reduced line space and smashed together. Chapter after chapter appears right after another without even a line break, let alone a page break. Impossible to read for relaxation. Makes your eye hurt.

  • This is the first I have ever read of Virginia Woolf. I found it a fascinating read. I came away learning new things and realizing women have felt inferior for a very long time. I hadn't realized this book is one of the beginnings of the feminist movement.

  • This book is not only an enjoyable and fairly quick read, but it is also an important milestone in not only feminist literature, but literature as a whole. Woolf's amusing and sharp assessments of the way men view women to be inferior, particularly in skill and intellegence, is (at least somewhat) relevent even today. She rightfully stresses the importance of every woman having both a room and money of her own. Without those two things, she can not be truely independant. A must for any lover of feminism or for anyone with a taste for short, smart books.