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ePub Appassionata download

by Eva Hoffman

ePub Appassionata download
Author:
Eva Hoffman
ISBN13:
978-1590513194
ISBN:
1590513193
Language:
Publisher:
Other Press; 1 edition (May 5, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Women's Fiction
ePub file:
1568 kb
Fb2 file:
1228 kb
Other formats:
mobi docx lrf txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
197

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Selected as one of Oprah

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Selected as one of Oprah.

She was born Ewa Wydra July 1, 1945 in Cracow, Poland after her Jewish parents survived the Holocaust by hiding in the Ukraine

Selected as one of Oprah  . Eva Hoffman is a writer and academic. She was born Ewa Wydra July 1, 1945 in Cracow, Poland after her Jewish parents survived the Holocaust by hiding in the Ukraine.

CárdenasAll rights reserved. For information write to Other Press LLC, 2 Park Avenue, 24th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Or visit our Web site: ww. therpress. tion DataHoffman, Eva, 1945-Appassionata, Eva Hoffman. c. reviously published as: Illuminations. eISBN 978-1-59051-351-41. Women pianists–Fiction. 2. Political refugees–Fiction. 3. Arts and society–Fiction. oreLess Show More Show Less.

Eva Hoffman was born in Krakow, Poland, and emigrated to America in her teens

Eva Hoffman was born in Krakow, Poland, and emigrated to America in her teens. She is the author of Lost in Translation, Exit Into History, Shtetl, The Secret, and After Such Knowledge, and the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Whiting Award, and an award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. More Author Information. Membership Advantages. Beyond the Book" backstories. Find books by time period, setting.

Eva Hoffman (born Eva Wydra on July 1, 1945) is an internationally acclaimed writer and academic. Eva Hoffman was born in Kraków, Poland, shortly after World War II. Her parents, Boris and Maria Wydra, survived the Holocaust by hiding in a forest bunker and then by being hidden by Polish and Ukrainian neighbours. In 1959, at the age of 13, she emigrated with her parents and sister to Vancouver, British Columbia.

Eva Hoffman’s eloquent new novel poses these and related questions, while also presenting a nuanced portrait of a. .Hoffman is no doubt familiar with the story about Lenin and his fondness for Beethoven’s Appassionata, a piano sonata he feared might distract him from the revolution

Eva Hoffman’s eloquent new novel poses these and related questions, while also presenting a nuanced portrait of a musician deeply engaged in the complexities of her art. Isabel Merton is an accomplished concert pianist living in New York. Hoffman is no doubt familiar with the story about Lenin and his fondness for Beethoven’s Appassionata, a piano sonata he feared might distract him from the revolution. But if the debate between Isabel and Anzor slowly loses interest, it is less because of its familiarity and more because the reader comes to wonder why Isabel is so tolerant of her lover’s scornful rages.

Selected as one of Oprah. Isabel Merton is a renowned concert pianist, whose performances are marked by a rare responsiveness to the complexities of her art, and its intensities of feeling. At the height of her career, she feels increasingly torn between the compelling musical realm she deeply inhabits, and her fragmented itinerant artist’s life, with its frequent flights, anonymous hotels, and brief, arbitrary encounters. At the height of her career, she feels increasingly torn between the compelling musical realm she deeply inhabits, and her fragmented itinerant artist's life, with its frequent flights, anonymous hotels, and brief, arbitrary encounters.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on November 30, 2011. As their paths cross in several cities, they are drawn to each other both by their differences and their seemingly parallel passions–until a menacing incident throws her into a creative crisis, and forces her to reevaluate her lover's actions, and her own motives.

Selected as one of Oprah.com’s 20 Tantalizing Beach ReadsSelected as a New York Times Book Review Editors' ChoiceIsabel Merton is a renowned concert pianist, whose performances are marked by a rare responsiveness to the complexities of her art, and its intensities of feeling. At the height of her career, she feels increasingly torn between the compelling musical realm she deeply inhabits, and her fragmented itinerant artist’s life, with its frequent flights, anonymous hotels, and brief, arbitrary encounters. Away from her New York home on a European tour, Isabel meets a political exile from a war-torn country, a man driven by a rankling sense of injustice and a powerful desire to vindicate his cause and avenge his people. As their paths cross in several cities, they are drawn to each other both by their differences and their seemingly parallel passions–until a menacing incident throws her into a creative crisis, and forces her to reevaluate his actions, and her own motives. In this story of contemporary love and conflict, Hoffman illuminates the currents and undercurrents of our time, as she explores the luminous and dark faces of romanticism, and those perennial human yearnings, frustrations, and moral choices that can lead to destructiveness, or the richest art. 
  • The author writes well, so, whatever the fruits of her labor, reading her is not a complete waste of time. However, the plot of this novel too easily and too quickly found itself on the familiar and boring "good versus evil" territory. We already have enough of that on certain TV channels. Definitions of terrorism are complex and largely depending on socio-political context. The book stays away from such murky waters. Here, beauty equals morality which in turn all equals the overall unquestionable goodness of the Western world. The novel was probably thought of as some deeper exploration of world's affairs (with a smart choice of an unknown, "neutral" type of a terrorist such as the Chechen whose sex appeal consists of anger) but the author basically surrendered mid-way and, after spending some 20 pages in an awkward limbo, ended up very flat with something inconclusive, delicately mysterious and vaguely comforting; something like "life will go on, goodness will prevail etc.". Most probably, she simply run out of time and patched up the novel very quickly. Of course, the ingredients for the book were right, but the result is basically disappointing. There is also the overwhelming "grandeur" of ultra-sophisticated vocabulary, which only adds to a slight impression of pretentiousness. More could be achieved by "less".

  • Not only was she self-absorbed, but she was stupid. Anyone in their right mind, no matter how naive, would have known better than to get herself on some of the positions this character did. It's difficult to enjoy a book when you don't like the protagonist. Very disappointing.

  • From the first page to the last I adored Isabel and more important, understood and identified with her. Though I'm no great artist, I travel a lot more than I care to, and I have met up with the Anzor's of this world as well. I have been in Isabels ecstacy and in her emptiness, and most of all in her space in Marseilles and LA, where she is so alone and yet working through the violence she has seen first hand.

    So, I loved "Apassionata" even more than my favorite "Lost in Translation," and will confess utter confusion that more here didn't also love Eva Hoffman's masterpiece. I mean she gets it all about our times from the various places in Europe to the surfers in LA, from the politesse of the dinner parties to the concrete hatred of her lover--I feel like this is one of those great books that is either under-appreciated or else not read in the way it is meant.

    Not liking my tone here, I just want to say how much language plays a part of my love for this and Hoffman's other books, for example, during her first pages her "Images skivvy through her mind.." or "Ahead, the aleatory sequence of the citiees"..."...maybe there is something hard about her life, in a late-capitalist way." "Bourgeois heroism... the acrobatics of being...

    Isabel's life as a traveling pianist how Eva Hoffman so gets the interiority of performance, that delight, and the aftermath: "She's beginning to feel a familiar desolation comng on, the arid ghost of the performance. She has been in plenitude and has been rapidly ejected... her descent from intoxication." I do not know why but all of Isabel's experience as a performer and as a lover and as someone so profoundly betrayed, all spoke to my soul and thank god for Peter, to whom I always felt she would come home.

    Thank you, Eva Hoffman for this masterpiece. May many know the joys herein.

  • I read the novel as Illuminations.I have not read this one but in Illuminations the main character is Isobel and the action involves musicians getting together under the aegis of someone called Wolfe. Hoffman beautifully conveys the world of the young concert pianist who thinks in terms of the next concert. What to play?How much of the concert should be modern and how much classical pieces.?It she ds dry but Isobel is very much a young lady and she likes shopping and going to good restaurants. Its a pity the title Lost in Translation became that of a terrible movie.

  • I love Eva Hoffman's writing and always approach a new work of hers with tremendous optimism and curiosity. This one, however, let me down badly. I found that most or all of the main characters were so tedious, unlikable and uninteresting, that it mattered not what happened to them or even why. Hoffman's prose in this book is also quite over the top and she really should have a dictionary at the back if she is determined to pepper her story with so many words not found in most of our vocabulary. Susurrus? Juddering? Aleatory? Acedia? All in a very few pages? I went to college and my IQ is more than my shoe size and my vocabulary respectable, but when a writer is more interested in showing off with words than with what they're actually saying or why or how, she's lost me. It is also worth noting here, I think, that for all of Hoffman's highfalutin' words, she manages to repeatedly refer to Fairway, the famous vegetable and fruit store on Broadway's Upper West Side, as The Fairway, which it is not. A bit more attention to details and characters might have improved this book and a bit less effort at being, well, sesquipedalian.

  • Appassionata (a much better title than its original, published-in-the-UK Illuminations) is a wonderful art-meets-life story in which art triumphs, however wounded may be the artist by what the author calls "the larger futility." Isabel learns "to give homage to the world not for its goodness, but for its Being." It's the least, and also the most, anyone can do. When the artist confronts the brutality of everyday political life, she has a choice: play (create) or retreat. Isabel does retreat, which makes her re-emergence into life all the more satisfying. This novel ends where it begins (in an airport) and yet travels not only the world (Europe) but also through the mind and heart of one of the great depictions of a performing artist in fiction.

    As for the writing (about which other readers have complained), it's like confronting Chopin and Schumann in prose. For some, yes, overblown; for others, ecstasy.