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ePub Flowering Judas and Other Stories (H B J MODERN CLASSIC) download

by Katherine Anne Porter

ePub Flowering Judas and Other Stories (H B J MODERN CLASSIC) download
Author:
Katherine Anne Porter
ISBN13:
978-0151318117
ISBN:
0151318115
Language:
Publisher:
Harcourt (June 1, 1990)
Category:
Subcategory:
World Literature
ePub file:
1599 kb
Fb2 file:
1987 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt docx mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
979

Flowering Judas and Other Stories by Katherine Anne Porter and a. .PORTER, Katherine Anne.

PORTER, Katherine Anne. Published by The Modern Library, Random House, New York (1962). With an unattributed biographical note, and an introduction by the author. - In Toledano spine 8, pale green cloth, gilt titling on maroon spine & cover blocks, faded red topstain, grey Kent endpapers, maroon and grey variant jacket style i, verso advertises 415 titles in ML catalog.

Pulitzer prize winner Katherine Anne Porter's short story collection still reads very well since its initial publication in 1935

Pulitzer prize winner Katherine Anne Porter's short story collection still reads very well since its initial publication in 1935 Читать весь отзыв.

Katherine Anne Porter. Collected stories and other writings. Flowering judas and other stories. No part of this book may be reproduced commercially by offset-lithographic or equivalent copying devices without the permission of the publisher.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Flowers and Foul Play.

Pulitzer prize winner Katherine Anne Porter's short story collection still reads very . Библиографические данные. Flowering Judas and other stories Harbrace modern classics Modern library of the world's best books (Том 284).

Pulitzer prize winner Katherine Anne Porter's short story collection still reads very well since its initial publication in 1935 Читать весь отзыв.

Flowering judas and other stories. MARÍA CONCEPCIÓN walked carefully, keeping to the middle of the white dusty road, where the maguey thorns and the treacherous curved spines of organ cactus had not gathered so profusely.

If Katherine Anne Porter had written nothing but these short narratives," observed the New York Times, "she .

If Katherine Anne Porter had written nothing but these short narratives," observed the New York Times, "she would be among the most distinguished masters of her craft in this country. If Katherine Anne Porter had written nothing but these short narratives," observed the New York Times, "she would be among the most distinguished masters of her craft in this country.

author: Katherine Anne Porter d. ate. Tower And Other Stories d. ights. holder: Katherine Anne Porter. te: 2004-08-10 d. citation: 1944 d. dentifier: RMSC, IIIT-H d. dentifier. origpath: 35 d. copyno: 1 d.

A Library of America eBook Classic. By Katherine Anne Porter . Category: Literary Fiction. If Katherine Anne Porter had written nothing but these short narratives, observed the New York Times, she would be among the most distinguished masters of her craft in this country. Also by Katherine Anne Porter. See all books by Katherine Anne Porter. About Katherine Anne Porter.

Flowering Judas: And Other Stories By Katherine Anne Porter Modern Library, 1940.

Her first book of stories, Flowering Judas (1930), received immediate recognition and critical acclaim. It was followed by Pale Horse, Pale Rider (1939), which includes the superb novella Noon Wine, and The Leaning Tower (1944). Flowering Judas: And Other Stories By Katherine Anne Porter Modern Library, 1940.

A collection of stories by the reknown author including such titles as "Maria Concepcion," "Virgin Violeta," "The martyr," "Flowering Judas," and "The cracked looking-glass"
  • The heroine of "Flowering Judas and Other Stories" is Katherine Anne Porter. I can only offer a crude facsimile of the impeccably precise fiction of Porter's short stories. She had a scheme for telling stories, many of which are based on her travels to locations outside the United States and in transition. She visited Mexico during the Mexican revolution of 1910-1917, where she joined with the Indians, general population, to oust the Diaz government. A fictional story just like a non-fictional story should consist of a beginning part, a main or middle part and an ending part. The way these parts are put together is called the structure of the story. The order does not need to be start, main, end nor is it necessary for all the parts be written on the page. Porter's stories all have the required parts and they are sewn together seamlessly. Other critics would call this part or the story beauty and the majority of readers would marvel at the most beautiful Judas.

  • Flowering Judas and Other Stories is a collection of Katherine Anne Porter's twelve earliest short stories (written in the 1920s and 1930s), many of which are set in Mexico, and all of which are memorable for their realistic insights into the human condition. These stories were all included in 1965's The Collected Stories of Katherine Anne Porter, the book that won her both a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award and marked the apex of her reputation.

    Several of the stories are set in Mexico during its revolutionary period from 1910 to the early 1920s, stories told largely from the points-of-view of ordinary Mexicans and American expatriates who find themselves caught up in the struggle. These include "Virgin Violetta," "The Martyr" and the book's first story, " Maria Concepcion."

    "Maria Concepcion" is typical of the "Mexico stories" in the sense that the revolution serves as the backdrop for a story that does not delve into the politics of that fight. Rather, this is the story of a young Mexican peasant woman who temporarily loses her husband to an even younger woman who is willing to follow him into battle. Maria's story is that of a woman fierce enough to reclaim what his hers when the opportunity finally offers itself, a woman so fierce that even the authorities respect her passion enough to allow her to get away with what she does.

    But my favorite stories from this collection are not the Mexico stories. The ones that appeal to me the most are the deceptively simple ones that focus on the relationship between husbands and wives. These are largely conversational presentations that wonderfully illustrate how much is left unsaid between husband and wife, stories in which inner thoughts are detailed inside the heads of her characters but never expressed out loud to each other during their long conversations.

    Two stories of this type particularly stand out for me: "Rope" and "The Cracked Looking Glass." "Rope" tells of the tensions between a woman and her husband that have been exaggerated by his decision to move them deep into the country to begin a new life, one which neither of them is prepared to live in that kind of isolation. When her husband returns from town one afternoon with a long length of rope coiled on his back, she is outraged to see that he has used their almost nonexistent savings to buy something they do not need. Their conversation is revealing; what they think but do not say to each other offers the real truth in their relationship.

    "The Cracked Looking Glass" explores another marriage, this one between an older man and a woman not yet prepared to settle into the lifestyle that his age demands. As in "Rope," what these two people say to each other is only part of their story. Their real character and the truths of their marriage are not generally expressed out loud by either of them, and the reader, for a while, comes to know more about the health of that marriage than do either of the parties involved.

    Katherine Anne Porter does not seem to be appreciated today as she once was and that is a shame because, as this collection so aptly illustrates, she is one of the finest short story writers in the history of American literature.

  • Originally published in 1930, Flowering Judas and Other Stories was the first collection of short stories by Katherine Anne Porter. These twelve selections constitute a remarkable literary debut, impressively showcasing not only Porter's exceptional talent but also her tremendous range.

    Eight of the twelve stories are set in Mexico, a country in which Porter lived, worked, and traveled. The title selection is the best of several masterpieces in the book. "Flowering Judas" tells the story of a 22-year-old American schoolteacher who moonlights as a revolutionary. The reality of the revolution falls far short of her preconceived, romantic notions. The head agitator she serves seems more concerned with bedding her than with the rebel cause. Even worse, she fails to live up to her own idealistic image of a revolutionary because she's too tied to her Catholic, American, bourgeois past to wholeheartedly devote herself to the fight. Throughout the book, Porter celebrates the beauty and romance of Mexico while simultaneously stripping away the pretty veneer to expose the often harsh and ugly reality underneath. She explores the Mexican experience from various perspectives: rural and urban, rich and poor, agrarian and intellectual, native and outsider. In "Hacienda," a Russian film crew shoots a movie which sounds an awful lot like Sergei Eisenstein's Qué viva Mexico! When the company of condescending outsiders occupies a hacienda where pulque is manufactured, cultural and class distinctions become glaringly apparent as the real life events of the inhabitants and the fictional narrative of the film become inextricably entwined.

    Porter is a fantastic writer, but there are still some weak links in this chain. "The Martyr," a fable about an artist who loses his muse, is a little too lighthearted to achieve any profound effect. The excessively brief "Magic" also seems a bit pointless. The least satisfying entry in the collection is "Theft," which is told in deliberately obscure, impressionistic prose reminiscent of some of William Faulkner's more self-indulgent ramblings. Thankfully, she rarely resorts to this sort of gratuitous verbal chicanery, though she's not averse to narrative experimentation. Elsewhere she uses the stream-of-consciousness technique to far better effect, as in "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall," told from the point of view of a dying 80-year-old-woman. In the excellent "Rope," she deftly interweaves the competing interior monologues of a bickering married couple.

    A common theme running through these stories is regret--regret for missed opportunities, lost loves, or loves retained long past their prime. In the exemplary piece "The Cracked Looking-Glass," a married couple resides on a farm in Connecticut, the husband thirty years older than the wife. The woman misses her former exciting life in New York City, laments her attachment to an aging husband, and longs for a reunion with a younger man she once knew. Like many of the stories included here, the conclusion relies on how she reacts to these regrets and whether or not she can come to terms with them.

    Porter demonstrates a clairvoyant insight into human psychology and a masterful skill at crafting riveting prose. The few low points in this collection are not the mistakes of a bad writer but rather the failed experiments of a brilliant scientist, necessary pitfalls in the course of a stellar career. This collection is a landmark work of literature by one of America's greatest authors.