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ePub Independence Day download

by Richard Ford

ePub Independence Day download
Author:
Richard Ford
ISBN13:
978-0676973969
ISBN:
0676973965
Language:
Publisher:
Vintage Books Canada (2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
World Literature
ePub file:
1596 kb
Fb2 file:
1709 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf azw docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
501

Independence Day is a 1995 novel by Richard Ford and the sequel to Ford's 1986 novel The Sportswriter. This novel is the second in what is now a four-part series, the first being The Sportswriter.

Independence Day is a 1995 novel by Richard Ford and the sequel to Ford's 1986 novel The Sportswriter. It was followed by The Lay of the Land (2006) and Let Me Be Frank With You (2014). Independence Day won the Pulitzer Prize and PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction in 1996, becoming the first novel ever to win both awards in a single year.

Home Richard Ford Independence Da. In these summery days my own life, at least frontally, is simplicity’s model

Home Richard Ford Independence Day. Home. Independence day, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56. 1996. In these summery days my own life, at least frontally, is simplicity’s model. I live happily if slightly bemusedly in a forty-four-year-old bachelor’s way in my former wife’s house at 116 Cleveland, in the Presidents Streets section of Haddam, New Jersey, where I’m employed as a Realtor Associate by the Lauren-Schwindell firm on Seminary Street.

Independence Day book. In this second novel of Richard Ford’s Frank Bascombe quartet, I was drawn further into the microcosm life and lifestyle of not only the man, but also the macrocosm of America – the environment and history that parallels the structure of his life. In this second novel Frank is experiencing what he calls his Existence Period, and I could sense the personal progress he made from what Frank labelled his fugue state in the previous novel.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Frank Bascombe is no longer a sportswriter, yet he's still living in Haddam, New Jersey, where he now sells real estate.

With a mastery second to none, Richard Ford has created, and continues to develop in "Independence Day," a character we know as well as we know our next-door neighbors. We miss it. And like the poet said: "The ways we miss our lives are life. From "Independence Da.

The author of five novels and two collections of stories, Richard Ford was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Independence Day, the first book to win both prizes

The author of five novels and two collections of stories, Richard Ford was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Independence Day, the first book to win both prizes. In 2001 he received the PEN/Malamud Award for excellence in short fiction. Библиографические данные. Independence Day: Bascombe Trilogy (2) Bascombe Trilogy (Том 2).

Independence Day is a moving, peerlessly funny odyssey through America and through the layered consciousness of one of its most compelling literary incarnations, conducted by a novelist of astonishing empathy and perception. Серия: "-" The Pulitzer Prize Winning novel for 1996. In this visionary sequel to The Sportswriter, Richard Ford deepens his portrait of one of the most unforgettable characters in American fiction, and in so doing gives us an indelible portrait of America.

Independence Day is a moving, peerlessly funny odyssey through America and through the layered consciousness of one of its most compelling literary incarnations, conducted by a novelist of extraordinary empathy and perception. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Boothbay resident Richard Ford, whose novel Independence Day was the first to win both the Pulitzer Prize and the .

Boothbay resident Richard Ford, whose novel Independence Day was the first to win both the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award, will receive the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction.

In this visionary sequel to The Sportswriter Richard Ford deepens his portrait of one of the most unforgettable characters in American fiction and in so doing gives us an indelible portrait of America.
  • Frank Bascombe is no longer a Sportswriter. In fact he is no longer a writer at all but has instead moved into the real estate business. Despite this, he cannot stop viewing the world as an outsiders. He observes; he sees the narrative arc of every event, but he cannot engage. He seems only to love when it is impossible, when the situations make long term commitment unlikely. He loves his ex-wife, now that she is his Ex, but could not engage her earlier. He loves his co-worker because he knows she will not commit to him. And her death and the death of his son, which opens Richard Fords earlier book "The Sportswriter," has made life too unpredictable, to scary to fully engage. It is certainly not a world where you think you can write stories that say anything about anything. Perhaps Real Estate will allow him to be with people while remaining distant because it is a job of intense short-term commitments. It works to a point, but his kids need more. And indeed Frank wants to give them more but he does not know how.
    For some Richard Ford's second Bascombe book will be too introspective, too slow moving. I did not feel that. Any novel about a middle aged man visiting the Baseball Hal of Fame with his son over the Independence Day weekend has me hooked from the first page. I found the novel moving and insightful even if Frank is a frustrating protagonist at times. (less)

  • I am a middle aged man who grew up in the NJ suburbs of Gotham, as Ford/Frank call Manhattan. Although I no longer live in the Garden State and haven't for decades, reading about Frank Bascombe puts me back there completey and convincingly. Frank's musings and meanderings (Frank IS meandering thru life) are so poignant, funny and ironic, that I've had to catch myself countless times from laughing out loud among strangers at an airport or diner. In so many ways, Ford's portraiture of NJ's version of suburban life are so spot on, it's breathtaking. If you rode the Erie Lackawana trains in the 70's, for example, with straw benches and swinging backs, you'll know exactly what I mean. I really can't say enough about this Frank Bascombe series. Do NOT read one, read them all. Rabbit may run, but for me, Bascombe won. Start with The Sports Writer and work your way forward. Take your time floating down the long, winding and very rewarding Bascombe river as life rolls by. It's brilliant stuff from start to finish.

  • This was a big-time book when it came out in 1995. Some critics likened it to the that years's Great American Novel. After reading Canada, I felt I should read other books by Ford, and especially one supposed to be a GAN.

    I enjoyed the witty first-person, in the moment POV. Nevertheless, not a whole lot happens in this very long story. It is quite funny and Ford's commentary on the then-current political situation (and presidential campaign) is hilarious and interesting.

    Ford is a marvelous writer, but for me, there was way too much internal kvetching going on , with parenthetical thoughts thrown in on almost every page. At first I enjoyed these sometimes long parenthetical asides, but then it got tiresome after several hundred pages of them.

    Canada is a fine book!

  • This was the first book I read by Richard Ford. After hearing that he is a fine writer, I chose this book because of the awards it received. I have only recently returned to reading English, after many busy years in which I barely used that language. And so, in the last few months, I have been trying to get to know contemporary literature. This book, though well written and interesting, is a very good example of my problem in finding books to read. The main character is apologetic. His aspirations are very modest, and he thinks that staying alive is enough. He is sorrowful about his divorce from his wife some seven years earlier, but continues the same behavior with his present girlfriend which led to the break up from his ex-wife. He has problems acting as a father, and parenting his children, and he seems scared of love. He seems to me to have a very weak personality, and most of the other people in the book... at least those whom we get to know well, seem limited, unhappy, and nearly unable to initiate steps in life that would bring them real happiness. The message that I got made me unhappy. It is very pessimistic. It almost doesn't allow for inspiration or hope. I didn't see much light in the scenery.

  • This is the 3rd novel of Ford's I've read over the last month. Each seemed more tedious than the previous one. In this one, the protagonist, Frank Bascombe, has entered what he calls the "existence" period of his life, in which he, well, simply "exists." He makes perceptive observations of his world and the people in it, but only truly engages with himself. He ruminates, and experiences brief flashes of feeling, which change abruptly and are oddly ungrounded and feel devoid of true emotion. Signature events of his life, the death of his young son, a divorce, a change of occupation, the unsolved murder of a former girlfriend, and the psychological unraveling of his adolescent son flow through him with little discernible impact. He is truly connected only to his interior monologue. Colleagues, he has no true friends; girlfriends, his ex wife, his children, are observed, and quite artfully described, but never fully understood or engaged. Finding himself in the midst of a genuine encounter with another, his first impulse is almost always to retreat. After a while this, to me, became frustrating. I put the book down for days at a time, only to pick it back up and re-frustrate myself. "Do something Frank!" He never does.
    If Ford means for Bascombe to represent the contemporary American Caucasin middle class male as obsessively self-involved, and emotionally stunted, then this may be a great book, worthy of its accolades. But this middle class Caucasin male found it tiresome and ultimately unfulfilling.