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by Susan Messer

ePub Grand River and Joy (Sweetwater Fiction: Originals) download
Author:
Susan Messer
ISBN13:
978-0472116997
ISBN:
0472116991
Language:
Publisher:
University of Michigan Press; First Edition edition (July 1, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
World Literature
ePub file:
1513 kb
Fb2 file:
1549 kb
Other formats:
mobi rtf rtf azw
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
153

After a two week reflection on Susan Messer's Grand River and Joy, the words "wisdom" and "nuance" describe my. .The book describes the events leading up to the Detroit race riots of the mid 1960s

After a two week reflection on Susan Messer's Grand River and Joy, the words "wisdom" and "nuance" describe my most enduring impressions. The book describes the events leading up to the Detroit race riots of the mid 1960s. Each scene is a gem in and of itself, defining a sparkling whole of texture and complexity.

Grand River and Joy book. She received an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship in prose, an Illinois Arts Council literary award for creative nonfiction, and a prize in the Jewish Cultural Writing Competition of the Dora Teitelboim Center for Yiddish Culture.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Grand River and Joy by Susan Messer . Place of Publication. Sweetwater Fiction: Originals. Trade Paperback (US),Unsewn, Adhesive Bound.

Place of Publication.

Grand River and Joy. Susan Messer. A novel that puts the reader right in the heart of the 1967 Detroit race riots. We welcome both new and established authors. We have no restrictions as to style or subject matter, but are unlikely to consider genre fiction, such as mystery, religious, science fiction, romance, and children's fiction. Sweetwater Fiction: Originalsstatic.

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Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/All Book Genres/Fiction & Literature‎. product description page. Grand River and Joy - (Sweetwater Fiction: Originals) by Susan Messer (Paperback).

Grand River and Joy, named after a landmark intersection in Detroit, follows Harry Levine through . It's a work of fiction set in a world that is anything but fictional, a novel about the intersections between races, classes and religions exploding in the long, hot summers of Detroit in the 1960s.

Grand River and Joy, named after a landmark intersection in Detroit, follows Harry Levine through the intersections of his life and the history of his city. Grand River and Joy is a powerful and moving exploration of one of the most difficult chapters of Michigan history.

Grand River and Joy (Sweetwater Fiction: Originals): ISBN 9780472034291 (978-0-472-03429-1) Softcover, University of Michigan Press, 2010. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. University of Michigan Press, 2009. Grand River and Joy is Susan Messer’s sensitive, well-crafted novel about Jewishblack relations in 1967 Detroit. Messer’s writing is dense, delicate, and charged, revealing racial and economic arguments that will be familiar to many of us. Ellie Barbarash is a writer, musician, and disability activist living in Philadelphia. Her non-fiction has been published in Bridges. Ordained as a Kohenet, she is working on producing an anthology, Clearing the Spring, Sweetening the Waters: A Renewed Call to Torah. More from Ellie Barbarash. A novel that puts the reader right in the heart of the 1967 Detroit race riots

Grand River and Joy. Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Messer, Susan. 1. a Sweetwater Fiction: Originals Ser. 505. 0.

"With unsparing candor, Susan Messer thrusts us into a time when racial tensions sundered friends and neighbors and turned families upside down. The confrontations in Grand River and Joy are complex, challenging, bitterly funny, and---painful though it is to acknowledge it---spot-on accurate."---Rosellen Brown, author of Before and After and Half a Heart

"Grand River and Joy is a rare novel of insight and inspiration. It's impossible not to like a book this well-written and meaningful---not to mention as historically significant, humorous, and meditative."---Laura Kasischke, author of The Life Before Her Eyes and Be Mine

Halloween morning 1966, Harry Levine arrives at his wholesale shoe warehouse to find an ethnic slur soaped on the front window. As he scavenges around the sprawling warehouse basement, looking for the supplies he needs to clean the window, he makes more unsettling discoveries: a stash of Black Power literature; marijuana; a new phone line running off his own; and a makeshift living room, arranged by Alvin, the teenaged tenant who lives with his father, Curtis, above the warehouse. Accustomed to sloughing off fears about Detroit's troubled inner-city neighborhood, Harry dismisses the soaped window as a Halloween prank and gradually dismantles “Alvin's lounge” in a silent conversation with the teenaged tenant. Still, these events and discoveries draw him more deeply into the frustrations and fissures permeating his city in the months leading up to the Detroit riots.

Grand River and Joy, named after a landmark intersection in Detroit, follows Harry through the intersections of his life and the history of his city. It's a work of fiction set in a world that is anything but fictional, a novel about the intersections between races, classes and religions exploding in the long, hot summers of Detroit in the 1960s. Grand River and Joy is a powerful and moving exploration of one of the most difficult chapters of Michigan history.

Susan Messer's fiction and nonfiction have appeared in numerous publications, including Glimmer Train Stories, North American Review, and Colorado Review. She received an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship in prose, an Illinois Arts Council literary award for creative nonfiction, and a prize in the Jewish Cultural Writing Competition of the Dora Teitelboim Center for Yiddish Culture.

Cover photograph copyright © Bill Rauhauser and Rauhauser Photographic Trust

  • This is a book I've read and have been enthusiastically REreading regularly from '09 to 2017!!! I became enthralled AS soon as I read the part about the annual "leaf burning"block-party which ellicted pleasant visions of all my longtime neighbors(most of whom settled on Indiana north of Tireman,south of Joy in '68 or'69 after fleeing the area ravaged by the '67 Retaliation)coming together on as crisp October evening,and strengthening bonds while grilling food,drinking hot cider and desposing of the colorful refuse cast off by the blocks stately trees!! Being a denizen of Detroit since 123 a.m early August in '71,I can't get ENOUGH of accounts of my beloved city in its past!! The oft-referred to"Riviera"theatre brought back memories of my highschool days,as the bus stop heading to Charles E. Chadsey High placed me right under the theatres marquee every morning. So,it was a nice touch to hear tales of this abandoned relic once being a vibrant establishment!!! Another good touch was the Levines business first being on West Jefferson,before the area was razed to make way for the citys' new Veterans Memorial Building and Civic Center. As long as the Civic Center been there,I couldn't before even IMAGINE retail businesses being there at one point!! Harrys encounter with a gentleman named"Root"at the end of a refreshing walk to the Detroit River,and culminated with their going into the D.I.A,revealed a LOT about the inception of Diego Riveras' contributions to the D.I.A,and left me yearning to visit the Institute of Art again to view his exquisite work from a fresh,new,informed perspective.. This book views the tumultuous 60s' from two very pointed perspectives. I even learned a lot of Yiddish terminology from the candid dialogue between the characters herein.In an attempt to give away bikes to underprivileged kids,Harry learns the truth behind the road to Hell being paved with good INTENTIONS!! Harrys stumbling upon a hidden shul,operating in the midst of a city burning to ashes,and in utter chaos,gave the reader real insight into his past. Detroits"Bakers Keybord Lounge"is mentioned as aspot for blacks to convene,in the days before it eventually became,as it stands to this day:"The WORLDS oldest continually operating jazz club!!"White Castle"was apparently just as popular then,as it is today!!"New Bethel"church gets honorable mention herein..When innocent little"Bobby"gets roughed-up by some rowdy kids,his dad states:"You know the neighborhood isn't"safe"like in the old days."when another observes:"Yeah,like when the(Jewish)"Purple Gang"lurked the city with machine guns." 'nuff said!! There is just TOO much in this great book about Detroit,for the native Detroiter to put down for long. There is even a lot written about Marvin Gaye moving onto the block after the Solomons unexpected move north of Eight Mile Road!! I'd assumed this was all a purely fictional account until I read another book about Detroit,which detailed facts about the city including the Motown acts and other noted Detroit performers,and mentioned Marvin Gayes deep ties to Detroit,and how he'd actually bought a house to reside in on Appoline street,near Outer Drive,where the greater part of this story transpires!!! Little-known Detroit establishments like the Collingwood,and the"Chit Chat"bars are mentioned,and I even asked my uncle who grew up near the epicenter of the '67 Retaliation about these bars and he verified their existence and importance in the area at the time!! The mention of the Birwood Wall was another fine touch,and I myself remember the Spartan housing for the underprivileged off of Eight Mile!! This book is such a delight for Detroiters both past and present that I've actually bought additional copies for others who share my zeal for the"Checkmate by the Strait"!! Adding to my delight with this book,is the presence of my favorite breed of dog;the Doberman Pinscher with Harrys dog"Sappho"which I began calling my own Red Doberman!! Harrys account at the D.I.A was something which took me back DECADES when I participated in a summer art program for artistically-inclined high-school students!! I never fully appreciated the scale of beauty of Diego Riveras monolithic mural at the D.I.A until"Root"began detailing the aspects surrounding its inception!!! I can't WAIT to get inside the Institute of Art and view the astonishing mural from a new,informed perspective!! Never occurred to me that Mumford High had a north wing for the Caucasians taking college-prep courses and a southern wing for blacks taking vocational courses. This book is SO very well-written that reading it is NOT a chore in the LEAST!!! Be GOOD to Yourself for a change and delve into this book fer cryin' out loud!!

  • Bought this book about a notable Detroit intersection (writes Messer: “Joy Road—now there was a misnomer”) after reading an excellent Messer story last summer in Glimmer Train.

    This novel covers the months leading up to Detroit’s horrific 1967 summer and its aftermath. The riot/rebellion the city and its residents--and vicariously, the entire country--experienced in July 1967 lasted five days, 43 people died, more than a thousand were injured, and the associated fires destroyed thousands of buildings. The city has never recovered.

    Messer's story details the intersection of lives, as well—black and white, Jewish and non-Jewish, parents and children. In the unsettled time leading up to the July events, Harry Levine—the Jewish owner of a wholesale shoe store founded by his father—and his family members and neighbors debate whether to leave their Detroit neighborhood and join the flight to the white suburbs. Harry also maintains an increasingly uneasy relationship with the store’s upstairs tenants, Curtis and his teenage son Alvin, who are black. Inescapable are the longstanding tensions between blacks and Jews, which derive from a tangled history of thwarted expectations and differing patterns of upward mobility.

    Early in the morning after Halloween, nine months before the uprising, Harry and his sister arrive at the store and find painted on the front window the words “Honky Jew Boy.” Alvin is suspected. Later during the riots, when buildings all around the store are erupting in flames, Harry’s building is one of the few to survive, partly because this time the white paint splashed across the front window spells out “Soul Brother.” Alvin wrote it to save his and Curtis’s home.

    Harry is a sympathetic character, but he suffers by a lack of coming to grips. He ignores problems with the building’s boiler, so it eventually threatens to blow up in a cloud of steam. More important, he downplays and ignores the simmering social forces in his community, which do explode in violence. While he could have been more conscientious about the boiler, the social forces were beyond one man’s capacity to redress. But he ignored how those forces might affect his wife, daughters, and sister, even though all around him “should we stay?” and “should we go now?” were a dominant conversation. Curtis, especially, tries to cut through the cotton wool Harry surrounds himself with and give him a dose of reality. It’s easier just to keep on keepin on.

    This is a beautifully written story by a thoughtful writer that contains barrels of good humor and fundamental humanity. It helps the reader examine many sides of a complex time that should not be forgotten as long as America’s issues with race remain unresolved.

  • After a two week reflection on Susan Messer's Grand River and Joy, the words "wisdom" and "nuance" describe my most enduring impressions. The book describes the events leading up to the Detroit race riots of the mid 1960s. Each scene is a gem in and of itself, defining a sparkling whole of texture and complexity. The narrative is crisp, vivid, funny, poignant. There is no judgment here. The reader can feel the weave of personal history and struggle for each character, each ethnic and racial group, and for the historical period as a whole. With courage, Messer characterizes both racial groups, along with differences of generation and economic standing. The reader feels for each character, could be each character. The author's wisdom and maturity shine through the narrative, as she describes ways in which individual lives, marriages, and racial struggles are a symphony of good impulses and bad, weakness and strength, hope and desperation. While defining a particular historical event, Messer's viewpoint could usefully inform a much broader set of issues. In our time, beset with a search for simple answers and with a tendency to demonize and oversimplify the other, this book shows a way. The characters also expand beyond the historical events, as they embody the messy process of personal evolution and growth in a complex world.