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ePub Hurry and the Monarch download

by Antoine O Flatharta,Meilo So

ePub Hurry and the Monarch download
Author:
Antoine O Flatharta,Meilo So
ISBN13:
978-0385737197
ISBN:
038573719X
Language:
Publisher:
Dragonfly Books; Reprint edition (February 10, 2009)
Category:
Subcategory:
Animals
ePub file:
1641 kb
Fb2 file:
1742 kb
Other formats:
txt mobi mbr lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
916

By Antoine O Flatharta Illustrated by Meilo S. When the beautiful orange Monarch on her fall migration route from Canada to Mexico stops to rest at Wichita Falls, Texas, she makes friends with an old tortoise called Hurry.

By Antoine O Flatharta Illustrated by Meilo So. By Antoine O Flatharta Illustrated by Meilo So. Best Seller. Category: Children’s Picture Books. She tells him, "Maybe one day you’ll break out of that shell, grow wings, and fly away," and then she is off again with millions of other Monarchs.

Meilo So’s watercolor illustrations have graced a number of children’s books about nature, including Pale Male: Citizen Hawk of New York City and The Beauty of the Beast: Poems from the Animal Kingdom. He lives in the Shetland Islands, Scotland.

Illustrated by. Meilo So. Number of Pages. but we are avid butterfly catchers! I think any child would like it, but those who are interested in metamorphosis really would enjoy this colorful and lovely book. Вам также могут понравиться. Текущий слайд {CURRENT SLIDE} из {TOTAL SLIDES}- Вам также могут понравиться.

Antoine O Flatharta (Author), Meilo So (Illustrator). The art in tis book is very well done and especially colorful, while the story line is fresh and entertaining for parent and child alike

Antoine O Flatharta (Author), Meilo So (Illustrator). The stay in Mexico gets brief coverage. The art in tis book is very well done and especially colorful, while the story line is fresh and entertaining for parent and child alike. In addition it provides interesting facts about the monarch butterfly.

Hurry and the Monarch book. Learning through story leaves a deeper impression and Antoine O Flatharta summarizes the 3 generational journey of the Monarch very well using Hurry the tortoise as contrast and grounding in the story. Meilo So's illustrations are warm, bright and beautiful, creating a visual experience of the thousands of Monarch's on this journey that seem otherwise unimaginable. I've read many butterfly information books and this one takes the cake A wonderful resource while learning about Monarch butterflies.

by Antoine Ó Flatharta & illustrated by Meilo S.

Title: Hurry and the Monarch By: Antoine O Flatharta Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 40 Vendor: Random .

Title: Hurry and the Monarch By: Antoine O Flatharta Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 40 Vendor: Random House Publication Date: 2009. Dimensions: . 0 X . 0 (inches) Weight: 2 pounds ISBN: 038573719X ISBN-13: 9780385737197 Ages: 4-8 Stock No: WW737197. Publisher's Description. Meilo So’s watercolor illustrations have graced a number of children’s books about nature, including Pale Male: Citizen Hawk of New York City and The Beauty of the Beast: Poems from the Animal Kingdom.

HURRY AND THE MONARCH. By Antoine O Flatharta. Illustrated by Meilo So. Knopf. Ages 5 to 8) On a fine autumn day, Hurry, a tortoise in Texas, chats with a monarch butterfly en route to Mexico. The butterfly goes on, while Hurry sleeps through the winter, and the life cycle resumes in the spring. The story, such as it is, gracefully combines elements of "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" and "Charlotte's Web," while the airy watercolor illustrations are both beautiful and accurate. By Sandra Day O'Connor. Illustrated by Dan Andreasen.

When the beautiful orange Monarch on her fall migration route from Canada to Mexico stops to rest at Wichita Falls, Texas, she makes friends with an old tortoise called Hurry. She tells him, "Maybe one day you'll break out of that shell, grow wings, and fly away," and then she is off again with millions of other Monarchs. In the spring, she stops again at Hurry's garden just long enough to lay her eggs and head north to Canada. Embedded in this lyrical and tender fictional presentation are the fascinating facts about the amazing 2,000-mile migration and the life cycle of butterflies. An afterword provides additional scientific data.
  • I love reading this book with my 2 year old. I have a feeling this will be a favorite (for me anyway!) for years to come :)

  • This is a wonderful story

  • This is one of our favorites, I cry, the kids love the story.
    (Homeschool mama, former biology teacher)

  • The art in tis book is very well done and especially colorful, while the story line is fresh and entertaining for parent and child alike. In addition it provides interesting facts about the monarch butterfly.

  • Such a journey traveled with two little friends and love to share this with our children. Love that they can grow together.

  • This is a beautiful story, gently told, about the amazing migration of monarch butterflies. It's a lush picture book to be read to a younger child by a parent, ideal for the young reader, and full of facts in the back for adults. A find.

  • I teach children between the ages of 3-6 and they just loved it. We raise Monarchs every Fall and they loved the fiction and non-fiction aspects.

  • Each fall the beautiful orange and black monarch butterflies migrate two thousand miles from Canada to Mexico. The facts about this migration are explained by Antoine O Flatharta in the Afterword to "Hurry and the Monarch," where young readers will learn about how each monarch begins life as a tiny egg on the underside of a milkweed leaf. However, it is the monarchs that are born in early autumn that end up making the long journey to Mexico, where they travel from 50 to 125 miles in a single day until they arrive in the fir forests of Mexico in early November and blanket the forest with millions of orange colored wings. Whereas the usual life span of a butterfly is four to six weeks, the monarchs that journey to Mexico usually live up to eight months and sometimes more. Compare this to the life of a land tortoise, which can live up to 100 years or more. That comparison is apt because in "Hurry and the Monarch" one of the beautiful butterflies makes friends with a tortoise named Hurry.

    The facts about the migration of the monarchs are certainly interesting, but the story illustrated by the watercolors of Melo So will make a bigger impression on young readers. The story begins when Hurry, who lives in Wichita Falls in the northern part of Texas, finds one October than a monarch butterfly has landed on his back. She is much more interested in him than he is in her, wondering why he does not break out of his shell, grow wings, and fly away (after all, that is what happened to her). Both creatures are affected by the coming cold weather, but while the monarch flys south to warmer lands, the tortoise just sleeps and waits out the winter. Then the monarch joins her comrades and flies south to Mexico. Melo So is able to contrast the orange and black of the monarch butterflies with the green and yellow of the world in which they live their transitory lives. Working with a rather simple palette of colors So creates a series of lovely watercolors bringing Flatharta's story to life.

    As you might expect in such a tale, the monarch returns one morning in the spring to Hurry's garden on her way back north to Canada. She lays eggs on a milkweed plant and flies away. There is a poignant end to her journey, but the emphasis in the story is now on the newborn caterpillar that Hurry watches grow and then transform into a new monarch. The ending of the story continues the lyrical narrative spun and older readers will better appreciate how Hurry and the new monarch butterfly part ways at the end. Flatharta has a nice sense of subtlety in telling this story, beginning with the wry irony of the names but more importantly in terms of how he involves the readers in the story by leading them to certain things without necessarily telling them outright. This simple story about the life cycle of the monarch butterfly has a nice sense of depth, which lifts it to a higher level as a children's book.