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ePub The Rooster Prince of Breslov download

by Eugene Yelchin,Ann Redisch Stampler

ePub The Rooster Prince of Breslov download
Author:
Eugene Yelchin,Ann Redisch Stampler
ISBN13:
978-0618989744
ISBN:
0618989749
Language:
Publisher:
Clarion Books (September 13, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Animals
ePub file:
1604 kb
Fb2 file:
1245 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf mbr rtf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
429

Stampler's witty retelling and Yelchin's imaginative, graphite and gouache illustrations bring to life this well-loved Yiddish folktale from Rabbi Nachman of Breslov (1772-1810). Children will enjoy picking up on the visual clues that reveal the old man's plan.

Stampler's witty retelling and Yelchin's imaginative, graphite and gouache illustrations bring to life this well-loved Yiddish folktale from Rabbi Nachman of Breslov (1772-1810). An author's note provides background information.

Start by marking The Rooster Prince of Breslov as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Rooster Prince of Breslov as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This picture book brings a light touch and engaging silliness to the story of a prince who rejects the lavish luxury of his upbringing in favor of a life a. .Fun images with lots of humor and Amazing colors and design. TRuly creative in his approach.

Ann Redisch Stampler (Goodreads Author), Eugene Yelchin (Goodreads Author) (Illustrator). Shelves: women-writers, jewish-lit, children-s-books. The Rooster Prince of Breslov is a ton of fun. The general story is really entertaining and humorous. The art suits the book (although it isn't a style I generally prefer).

By Eugene Yelchin, Ann Stampler.

Ann Redisch Stampler; Eugene Yelchin, illus. In this version of a Rav Nachman of Breslov tale, psychological insight is paired with strong Jewish values and enhanced by humorously insightful illustrations. National Jewish Book Awards Winner 2010. Download the Rooster Prince of Breslov Reading Guide from PJ Library. Discussion Questions. Jewish literature inspires, enriches, and educates the community.

Ann Redisch Stampler, Eugene Yelchin a rooster.

by Eugene Yelchin and Ann Redisch Stampler.

Honors and Exhibitions. The Rooster Prince of Breslov, published by Clarion Books (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) has been chosen the winner of the 2010 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD in the category of Illustrated Children’s Books

Honors and Exhibitions. The Rooster Prince of Breslov, published by Clarion Books (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) has been chosen the winner of the 2010 NATIONAL JEWISH BOOK AWARD in the category of Illustrated Children’s Books. The National Jewish Book Awards, the longest-running North American awards program of its kind in the field of Jewish literature. Given by the Jewish Book Council annually since 1948, the awards are designed to recognize outstanding books on Jewish topics each year.

The Rooster Prince of Breslov: Ann Redisch Stampler, Eugene Yelchin: National Jewish Book Awards Winner. Abrams Books for Young Readers, new version of the classic Hans Christen Andersen fairytale about a tin soldier who falls in love with a toy ballerina"- Provided by publisher. Finally found the perfect spot for "The Steadfast Tin Soldier". Next to the TV on the new credenza layered Emily Clark style. it repeats the colors found in the lake picture on the other side of the room.

The rooster prince of breslov. Written by Ann Redisch Stampler Illustrated by Eugene Yelchin. In this variation on a well-known Yiddish tale, a young prince takes on the ways of a rooster. His frantic parents try everything they can think of to cure their so. t last, a wise and patient old man tries something very different. T. he unnamed elderly man in this version of a renowned Yiddish folktale is an example of the best that a teacher can be. The man’s treatment of the rooster prince (and the boy’s growing acceptance of the man) exemplifies the Jewish value of kavod (respect).

This picture book brings a light touch and engaging silliness to the story of a prince who rejects the lavish luxury of his upbringing in favor of a life as . . . a rooster. The only person who can persuade the prince to reconsider is neither a doctor nor a magician but a wise teacher who is willing to become a rooster too. Told to the author by her grandmother, who brought it from Eastern Europe a century ago, this traditional tale is accompanied by strikingly witty and graceful illustrations that add their own folkloric flavor. Author's note.
  • It was just what I wanted.

  • Both the 3 & 5 year love it. The 5 yr. old can read it himself and the 3 yr old wants it read to her over and over.

  • In the three Jewish folktales that Ann Redisch Stampler has retold for children, she has shown a blend of wit and psychological insight that with the lightest of touches reveals the stories' meaning and their application to the difficult process of growing up. Her writing is so deft that the rather profound themes of the stories are never told but always shown, a fundamental test of good writing. The Rooster Prince of Breslov, in some versions called The Turkey Prince, is one of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov's tales. It can be found in many collections as well as in at least two individual illustrated versions. It is usually interpreted to mean that in order to be successful, a teacher must approach students at their own level, just as the old man in the story pretends to the confused young prince that he too is a fowl. In Stampler's version, the thematic focus is on the child, who through gentle teaching is able to acquire empathy for others or, as the author puts it in a note, "to become a man by developing rachmanis, or true compassion, and practicing mitzvoth, or good deeds."
    The central task of childhood is to grow beyond the self, beyond infantile egocentricity. Stampler's version of the rooster prince story recognizes this and suggests a Jewish model of how this goal may be achieved. She tells the story of an alienated child whose sense of self has been impeded by over-indulgent parents. Eugene Yelchin's illustrations express the psychological depths of the story through images that are more archetypal than realistic. All of the human characters are comical looking and slightly distorted, shown from odd angles and perspectives. The skinny, red-headed turkey prince and the grizzled old man who convinces him to return to humankind are usually naked, but artfully posed by the illustrator to preserve modesty. Many of the double page spreads resemble stage sets, reflecting Yelchin's work in the theatre. Through its harmony of words and illustrations, this version of an oft-told tale is strikingly original. For Kdg. - Gr. 4. Highly recommended. Winner of a 2010 National Jewish Book Award.
    Linda R. Silver

  • In a fairy tale land, a Jewish prince suddenly rips off his clothes, yells Cock-a-doodle-doo, and begins behaving like a rooster. His distraught parents appeal to doctors and magicians, but the cure comes by way of a wise old man who joins the boy in crowing and pecking, and gradually leads him back towards a human lifestyle. This is a beautiful retelling of the Yiddish folktale by Rabbi Nachman of Breslov, that infuses the humorous story with deeper meaning. Instead of focusing merely on the joke of how the prince is tricked into acting like a man (while still believing himself to be a rooster), this version allows the rooster phase to represent the boy's spiritual struggle, his dissatisfaction with his pampered life, and his basic goodness. The author's endnote confirms that the book is meant as a coming-of-age story in which the prince learns that compassion and good deeds make him human. The quirky art, with its jagged lines and unusual perspectives, works well to show the awkwardness of the rooster lifestyle. Each upcoming stage in the prince's treatment is cleverly foreshadowed in the pictures, engaging readers in the old man's plans. The nakedness of the prince and old man is discreetly shown in profile views, although young readers will inevitably giggle over the amount of skin shown. This is a great teaching story, amusingly told. The writing is smooth, lyrical, and compelling, and the art is an excellent match for the story's flavor. A good combination of vibrant storytelling and engaging art, this version of The Rooster Prince is highly recommended. Grades 2-5. Heidi Estrin

  • I've always loved folktales...and The Rooster Prince of Breslov is wonderful retelling of an old Jewish one will strike a chord with many parents who feel their kids have too much.
    This book is a great read aloud for younger children...and older ones will enjoy guessing what comes next as the illustrator has cleverly planted clues on each page. The illustrations, by the way, are bright, bold, and altogether unique.
    As a teacher and parent, I highly recommend this book...kids will love the humor and the happy ending and parents will appreciate the gentle lesson in what makes a man ready for leadership.

  • We read this book to our children again and again. It is about a boy who rebels so far against the materialism of his privileged life that he pretends to be a rooster. After the parents try doctors and magicians to bring him back into the fold, a kindly old man gives him the opportunity to live a life of service. The end makes me tear up, it is such a beautiful book. A lot of bedtime books get old the umpteenth time you read them, but this never does.

  • "You're right! replied the old man. "It's the way you treated a cold, hungry, achy old rooster that makes you a man. For it was you, Your Majesty, who wrapped me in a blanket and shared you Sabbath feast with an old traveler."

    I love this story of a prince who has-it-all, and yet doesn't have enough. What does he lack? Simply the chance to share and give to others.

    THE SKINNY:::
    This traditional Jewish tale will have kids smiling and thinking. It's a great read-aloud. And Eugene Yelchin's whimsical artwork is both colorful and intriguing.

    Pam T~
    mom/blogger

  • The story of how a spoiled prince goes mad in reaction to overabundance, and learns to be a mensch through a rabbi ("old man") giving him the opportunity to be generous, is a variation on a chasidic tale. Yelchin illustrates it beautifully, with characters out of George Grosz and marginalia for curious readers. The colors are splendid and the prose surprisingly precise ("a swayback table") The moral of the story sinks in more slowly than the delight in seeing the naked prince clucking and pecking at corn on the palace floor. A book children will remember vividly.