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by Gary Paulsen

ePub Harris and Me download
Author:
Gary Paulsen
ISBN13:
978-0440409946
ISBN:
0440409942
Language:
Publisher:
Yearling (April 1, 1995)
Category:
Subcategory:
Geography & Cultures
ePub file:
1619 kb
Fb2 file:
1151 kb
Other formats:
docx lit azw txt
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
841

Gary James Paulsen (born May 17, 1939) is an American writer of young adult literature, best known for coming of age stories about the wilderness.

Gary James Paulsen (born May 17, 1939) is an American writer of young adult literature, best known for coming of age stories about the wilderness. He is the author of more than 200 books and has written more than 200 magazine articles and short stories, and several plays, all primarily for teenagers. He won the Margaret Edwards Award from the American Library Association in 1997 for his lifetime contribution in writing for teens.

Gary Paulsen never shuns writing about real life to spare your kiddies' artificial innocence. His books deal with the pains and joys of childhood - parental quarrels, alcoholism, abusive behavior, etc. - more forthrightly than any other children's writer I encountered with my own son as he was learning to read, and my son loved Paulsen's book enough to choose them for himself. Harris and Me" is a first-person narrative, told by a boy whose dysfunctional family has sent him to live with kinfolk on a backcountry farm in Minnesota.

Personal Response: I thought the book Harris and Me by Gary Paulsen was a very fun, light read. I grew up in a farming community with brothers who were always up to mischief

Personal Response: I thought the book Harris and Me by Gary Paulsen was a very fun, light read. I grew up in a farming community with brothers who were always up to mischief. These facts helped me relate to this story.

His cousin Harris soon takes care of that. Harris is rude and crude and finds trouble at every turn. He leads his city cousin into everything from wrestling slippery pigs to catching mice to a daredevil jump out of a barn loft. Although Paulsen is perhaps best known for his dramatic adventure stories, he has also, over the years, given us glimpses of wonderful comedy-in his depiction of the tobacco-spitting plumber in The Island (1988), in the self-deprecating humor and farce found in the Iditarod experiences he wrote about in Woodsong (1990), and in the wacky, not entirely successful comic novel The Boy Who Owned the School (1990).

Harris and me: a summer remembered/Gary Paulsen. p. cm. Summary: Sent to live with relatives on their farm because of his unhappy home life, an eleven-year-old city boy meets his distant cousin Harris and is given an introduction to a whole new world. 1. Farm life-Fiction 2. Cousins-Fiction.

Herrick District LibraryVideosLet's Talk Books! with Mary Harris and Me by Gary Paulsen. English (US) · Español · Português (Brasil) · Français (France) · Deutsch.

OTHER YEARLING BOOKS YOU WILL ENJOY: HARRIS AND ME, Gary Paulsen THE HAYMEADOW, Gary Paulsen THE . He says my escort and I should meet him at the airport in Denison Falls and he’ll explain everything. Dunc grabbed the letter and read out loud: Dear .

OTHER YEARLING BOOKS YOU WILL ENJOY: HARRIS AND ME, Gary Paulsen THE HAYMEADOW, Gary Paulsen THE COOKCAMP, Gary Paulsen THE VOYAGE OF THE FROG, Gary Paulsen THE BOY WHO OWNED TH. Once again, your government has need of your special talents. Bring your escort and meet me at gate thirty-seven and I will explain your assignment. Your code name is Popeye. Guard the key with your life.

The main idea/lesson of a story; its point; the moral (In the book, several important themes are the importance of family, the importance of having a sense of belonging, don't judge a book by its cover). The story's central/main character; the one who must attempt to solve or deal with the main problem.

Paulsen was a book lover from his childhood

Paulsen was a book lover from his childhood. He developed love for reading at a young age. When he got the first book issued from the library he went to the basement of his house and read it without a stop. He then read several books in the basement of his house. Paulsen didn’t have actual family life, till the age of seven.

This summer will be different. That's for sure. When an eleven-year-old city boy is dropped off to stay on a farm with relatives, he doesn't know what to expect. His cousin Harris soon takes care of that. Harris is rude and crude and finds trouble at every turn. He leads his city cousin into everything from wrestling slippery pigs to catching mice to a daredevil jump out of a barn loft. And that's not all. There are swimming and cowboy movies and enough good food to fill the boys up for days.Farm life is hard but never lonely. Before long, Harris's cousin has found a place where he belongs. If only summer could last forever.
  • This book is utterly hilarious from start to finish. I was introduced to it by a sixth grader who was reading it with his class, and it's a great choice by his teacher. The light vulgarity and somewhat dicey subject matter works to great advantage in engaging the young readers, who want something with a little "bite" to it. Very rarely do I find myself laughing aloud while reading, but this book pulled it off on multiple occasions, particularly when the characters are getting whooped on by various barnyard creatures!

  • The first time I read this book I was in fourth grade and since then I read it periodically. It's full of laughs and it's a great entertainer. When my kids are old enough I may have them read it too. If you love to laugh, you need to read this because you will find yourself laughing until your ribs hurt!

  • I'm not exactly sure what you may mean by "reluctant reader", but if it means anything I think it means a choosy reader who has trouble getting in to and staying in any particular book. Why "fart and booger" books are supposedly the prescribed cure for that malady, I also don't know.

    That said, if fantasy/adventure isn't appealing, I can see where finding another appropriate offering can be tough. Hence, this book. The boy narrator is solid and decent, but pretty believably real. The summer-on-the-farm theme could be lame, but here it isn't. It isn't because it is written about a time when a summer on a farm could be pretty darn exciting for a city boy. And that's especially so when your farmboy cousin is as high-spirited as is Harris.

    The book is not artificial or full of phony innocence. It is straightforward slightly goofy fun. It is not at all condescending, and celebrates youthful energy without becoming some over-written "song of innocence". So, if you want to try a book that just seems to involve genuine summer pleasures, this is a good candidate.

  • Gary Paulsen never shuns writing about real life to spare your kiddies' artificial innocence. His books deal with the pains and joys of childhood - parental quarrels, alcoholism, abusive behavior, etc. - more forthrightly than any other children's writer I encountered with my own son as he was learning to read, and my son loved Paulsen's book enough to choose them for himself.

    "Harris and Me" is a first-person narrative, told by a boy whose dysfunctional family has sent him to live with kinfolk on a backcountry farm in Minnesota. Harris is the bigger boy whose family has the farm. He becomes the narrator's surrogate brother and role model for devil-may-care enjoyment of boyish wildness. The narrator sense that his own nature is different from Harris's but he treasures Harris's spirit. It's a quick read for an adult, a kind of hyper-condensed adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. It's funny fun for the right kid to read silently or out loud, but children raised in a household devoted to propriety may find it incomprehensible, since propriety is not a virtue on Gary Paulsen's farm.

    One might suspect that this narrative, like many of Paulsen's, is semi-autobiographical. I'm very certain, however, that Paulsen has somehow gotten ahold of my unwritten memoirs, and used MY childhood for his model. I've seldom read anything that depicts the experiences of farm life, in Minnesota or in Sweden, fifty years ago or today, as accurately as this short book. I mention Sweden because I lived as a boy on a diary farm near Nykoping that was identical to Harris's. Like Paulsen, I've traveled very far, physically and culturally, from that farm, but in my heart of hearts I'm still Harris, and/or his admiring sidekick, myself. For a writer like Paulsen, "home" is not so much a place but rather a time of life.

    Paulsen's most popular books are imaginative adventure tales featuring intrepid boys. "The Hatchet" is his best seller. Shorter, more personal books like "Harris and Me" are, in my opinion, better choices for kids to read, offering flashes of insight into maturity, however challenging, instead of day-dream invulnerability.

  • I bought this copy for a friend. It's a romanticized account of a summer in the country. Even though it is idealized, nevertheless for me Paulsen has also managed to put a finger on some of the sensibility that makes me prefer the countryside to the urban existence. Well written as a children's story but still enjoyable as an adult; a kind of simple literary comfort food.

  • I have had this book read to me by several different teachers (from 5th grade all the way through senior year) back when I was in school... So when my daughter was trying to decide on a book for her 6th grade reading project, I recommend this one. Not having read it in several years, I found myself laughing right along with her -and sometimes before her- as I read out loud; recalling the hilarious events of the story as they were about to transpire. Oops- spoiler-alert gone-wild... Sorry kiddo ????... Anyway, needless to say, I enjoyed it as much (if not more so) than I did the first (5-or-so) times ????????????

  • This book should be on everyone's top 10 list! It makes me laugh out loud every time I read it! (It also makes me cry.) Paulsen is a genius, and the poignant way he describes his youth leaves me in awe. I taught Language Arts to sixth graders for years and my children who read it loved it too. My father read it out loud to my stepmother every night in bed for two weeks when he was 74 years old. I was visiting at the time, and I loved walking past their bedroom door and hearing the laughter and "Harris" discussions. Grab this book, read it, and give it as a gift to everyone you love!

  • As a teacher,I have read this book many times to my students, and I always warned them to be sure to go to the bathroom first or they might pee their pants. It's that funny.
    And now as a retired teacher, I am still reading this heartfelt gem and warning the old ladies in my book club the same. This is a must read of simpler times. Oh how I wish for one more summer.