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ePub Kamishibai Man download

by Allen Say

ePub Kamishibai Man download
Author:
Allen Say
ISBN13:
978-0618479542
ISBN:
0618479546
Language:
Publisher:
HMH Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (October 24, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Geography & Cultures
ePub file:
1906 kb
Fb2 file:
1787 kb
Other formats:
mobi docx lrf doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
894

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The Kamishibai man used to ride his bicycle into town where he would tell stories to the children and sell them candy.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

We've read several books by Allen Say, and our girls love learning more about Japan, especially since they were born there. We will certainly look for more of his stories at our local library. This story was selected as one of the books for the January 2013 - Books about Artists discussion at the Picture-Book Club in the Children's Books Group here at Goodreads.

Allen Say (born James Allen Koichi Moriwaki Seii in 1937; surname written Seii (清井) in Japanese) is an Asian American writer and illustrator. He is best known for Grandfather's Journey, a children's picture book detailing his grandfather's voyage from Japan to the United States and back again, which won the 1994 Caldecott Medal for illustration. This story is autobiographical and relates to Say's constant moving during his childhood.

The Kamishibai man used to ride his bicycle into town where he would tell stories to the children and sell them candy, but gradually, fewer and fewer children came running at the sound of his clappers. They were all watching their new televisions instead. Finally, only one boy remained, and he had no money for candy. Years later, the Kamishibai man and his wife made another batch of candy, and he pedaled into town to tell one more story-his own.

When a retired "kamishibai man," a traditional picture storyteller in Japan, decides to try to sell his candies and tell his stories one more time, he realizes. When a retired "kamishibai man," a traditional picture storyteller in Japan, decides to try to sell his candies and tell his stories one more time, he realizes. see all When a retired "kamishibai man," a traditional picture storyteller in Japan, decides to try to sell his candies and tell his stories one more time, he realizes how much the city has changed over.

by Allen Say Caldecott Award winner Allen Say's book is a remembrance of a time in Japan when Kamishibai men were important in children's lives and a commemoration of the power of these memories. In the afterword to this heart-warming story, we learn that kamishibai, a traveling 'paper theater', was a well-loved form of entertainment for children in Japan, mainly from the 1930s to the 1950s, when television superceded it.

Say's lovely new book is about an elderly Kamishibai man, long retired, who, missing his rounds, decides to pedal back to the old neighbourhood for one last performance

Say's lovely new book is about an elderly Kamishibai man, long retired, who, missing his rounds, decides to pedal back to the old neighbourhood for one last performance. The quietly dramatic, beautifully evocative tale contains a cliffhanger of its own, and its exquisite art, in the style of Kamishibai picture cards, will attract even the most jaded kid away from the TV to enjoy a good, good book. See all 5 brand new listings. Kamishibai Man by Allen Say (Hardback, 2005). Brand new: lowest price.

The Kamishibai man used to ride his bicycle into town where he would tell stories to the children and sell them candy, but gradually, fewer and fewer children came running at the sound of his clappers. They were all watching their new televisions instead. Finally, only one boy remained, and he had no money for candy. Years later, the Kamishibai man and his wife made another batch of candy, and he pedaled into town to tell one more story—his own. When he comes out of the reverie of his memories, he looks around to see he is surrounded by familiar faces—the children he used to entertain have returned, all grown up and more eager than ever to listen to his delightful tales. Using two very different yet remarkable styles of art, Allen Say tells a tale within a tale, transporting readers seamlessly to the Japan of his memories.
  • I have beeen reading this story to 6-8 year olds for 6 years. The best recommendation I can give is that the children think it is a wonderful story and they often clap at the ending . It is the story of storytellers in Japan before the days of television. Kamishibai, which means theater, could be seen on the streets of Japan telling stories to children from their little box theaters. Then TV came along and made the Kamishibai men somewhat obsolete.

  • I appreciate this book mostly for the illustrations, though it is certainly well-written as well. The real fan is my daughter though - she was deeply moved by the story and connected to it in a way I would not have guessed. The author is also the artist; if you can enjoy detailed illustration and sensitive, nuanced writing, you will likely value and enjoy this book.

  • As a nostalgic person with a respect for history, this book touched my heartstrings. Our young children paid close attention, admired the story, the breathtaking illustrations, and grasped the emotions and lessons of the book. As we raise children to respect tradition, history, and their elders, this is a good "assist."

  • Perfect for my 2nd graders.

  • Allen Say is a great author and artist. His work can be enjoyed by adults and children. I have most of books which are appropriate for children of various ages, some older exclusively. Mostly for all ages. Wonderful charming human fun instructive.

  • I absolutely love this book. My youngest (kindergarten) loves this book too. Beautiful pictures, touching story, learn a little about japan. I recommend this book.

  • 2-yr-old daughter loved it

  • This charming story was the perfect introduction for reading the Kamishibi story of THE BAMBOO PRINCESS to my music students. I played Japanese music to accompany both stories and the children were mesmerized!