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ePub Heroes download

by Dom Lee,Ken Mochizuki

ePub Heroes download
Author:
Dom Lee,Ken Mochizuki
ISBN13:
978-0613033510
ISBN:
0613033515
Language:
Publisher:
San Val (April 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Growing Up & Facts of Life
ePub file:
1215 kb
Fb2 file:
1820 kb
Other formats:
mbr rtf lrf docx
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
745

This book evocatively recreates a time when the war was still fresh in the minds of young parents, and ably shows how subtly prejudice was passed on to their children.

This book evocatively recreates a time when the war was still fresh in the minds of young parents, and ably shows how subtly prejudice was passed on to their children. But Heroes is also a tribute to the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, an all-Japanese- American regiment, and serves as a reminder of their important contribution.

By Dom Lee, Ken Mochizuki. Other Books You Might Like. Related Book Resources.

In Ken Mochizuki and Dom Lee's "Heroes", Donnie is tired of his "friends" relegating his to the role of the "bad guy" during their game of war. Donnie agrees to play the enemy during war is because he does not have many friends and he will take whatever he can get. His friends constantly. His friends constantly tease him and believe that his family is the enemy.

Heroes, a multi-award winner, is the Mochizuki/Lee team's follow-up to the critically acclaimed Baseball Saved Us. During World War II, approximately 50,000 Americans of Asian ancestry served in the . armed forces; most volunteered willingly even after they had been unjustly imprisoned in internment camps. Ironically, the 442nd Regiment, an all-Japanese American infantry regiment led by a Korean American was one of the most decorated units ever in . Heroes by Ken Mochizuki, illustrated by Dom Lee. Donnie’s friends always force him to play the enemy because, as a Japanese American, he looks like them.

Mochizuki and Lee tell a moving picture-book story about a Japanese American child who is treated as the enemy in his own country. American Library Association Booklist. This book evocatively recreates a time when the war was still fresh in the minds of young parents, and ably shows how subtly prejudice was passed on to their children.

Ken Mochizuki, Dom Lee. Japanese American Donnie, whose playmates insist he be the "bad guy" in their war games, calls on his reluctant father and uncle to help him get away from that role show more.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

by. Mochizuki, Ken, 1954-; Lee, Dom, 1959- ill. Publication date. Japanese Americans, Japanese Americans. New York : Lee & Low Books. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Digital Library of Japanese American Incarceration. Uploaded by MerciG on September 27, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

From the author of Baseball Saved Us comes an intergenerational story that describes how a Japanese-American family deals with the painful legacy of war.

ISBN13:9781880000502. Release Date:April 2000. Publisher:Lee & Low Books.

by Ken Mochizuki illustrated by Dom Le. Heroes Teacher's Guide. ABOUT THE AUTHOR AND ILLUSTRATOR Ken Mochizuki is a native of Seattle, WA, where he currently lives.

by Ken Mochizuki illustrated by Dom Lee. Reading Level Interest Level: Grades 1-5 Reading Level: Grades 2-3 (Reading level based on the Spache Readability Formula) Accelerated Reader® Level/Points: . /. 5 Lexile Measure®: 670 Scholastic Reading Counts!™: . Having received his bachelor's degree in communications from the University of Washington, he went on to spend five years as a professional actor in Los Angeles.

  • My grandma was in camp. I new all of her generation, so passing the story to my kids can be challenging. This series is a great way to keep some things alive.

  • Will be using this book when I work with kids

  • This book is fair, but is more about being bullied than heroes.

  • A previous review asks why the boy in this story had to have help from his father and uncle to solve his problem with his classmates... children often need the help of the adults in their lives to solve problems. That is the nature of a child-parent relationship. I appreciated the way the uncle and father helped Donnie deal with the racist attitude of his classmates. I read this book to my children because I felt it was an excellent opportunity for them to develop empathy for someone "different" than themselves. As the parent of adopted children who have a Native American and Mexican heritage, I look for ways to develop in my kids a sense of diversity. I checked this book out from the library, but I am buying it because I would like to read it over and over to my kids! Perhaps I will have the opportunity to share it with their classrooms as well!