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by Baroness Orczy

ePub The Scarlet Pimpernel (Puffin Classics) download
Author:
Baroness Orczy
ISBN13:
978-0140374544
ISBN:
014037454X
Language:
Publisher:
Puffin Books; Reissue edition (March 1, 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Literature & Fiction
ePub file:
1783 kb
Fb2 file:
1894 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf doc mbr
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
236

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baroness emmuska orczy. Duke Classics does not accept responsibility for loss suffered as a result of reliance upon the accuracy or currency of information contained in this book. The Scarlet Pimpernel. ISBN 978-1-62011-445-2. Chapter I - Paris: September, 1792. Chapter II - Dover: "The Fisherman's Rest". Chapter III - The Refugees. Chapter IV - The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel. Chapter V - Marguerite. Chapter VI - An Exquisite of '92.

Complete and unabridged. Penguin Classics: The Scarlet Pimpernel (9780140374544) by Baroness Emmuska Orczy. Baroness Emmuska Orczy (1865-1947), an only child of Austro-Hungarian nobles, lived most of her life in London, where she built her reputation as an established novelist, playwright, and artist. Also a success on stage, her most famous novel, The Scarlet Pimpernel, spawned a series of books featuring its cast of characters.

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The Scarlet Pimpernel is the first novel in a series of historical fiction by Baroness Orczy, published in 1905. It was written after her stage play of the same title enjoyed a long run in London, having opened in Nottingham in 1903

The Scarlet Pimpernel is the first novel in a series of historical fiction by Baroness Orczy, published in 1905. It was written after her stage play of the same title enjoyed a long run in London, having opened in Nottingham in 1903. The novel is set during the Reign of Terror following the start of the French Revolution. The title is the nom de guerre of its hero and protagonist, a chivalrous Englishman who rescues aristocrats before they are sent to the guillotine.

The Scarlet Pimpernel is considered one of the greatest adventure novels of all time. It is the first in a series of stories about Percy Blakeney, an Englishman in France during the French Revolution's Reign of Terror, who lives a double life as an English aristocrat and a swashbuckling masked rescuer of French aristocrats from the guillotine. The Scarlet Pimpernel is the classic tale of action and adventure that literally invented the genre of the masked avenger.

About The Scarlet Pimpernel

About The Scarlet Pimpernel. The first and most successful in the Baroness’s series of books that feature Percy Blakeney, who leads a double life as an English fop and a swashbuckling rescuer of aristocrats, The Scarlet Pimpernel was the blueprint for what became known as the masked-avenger genre. As Anne Perry writes in her Introduction, the novel has almost reached its first centenary, and it is as vivid and appealing as ever because the plotting is perfect. It is a classic example of how to construct, pace, and conclude a plot.

The selection of books is the same! Shop on BookOutlet. ca Stay on BookOutlet. NOTE: This title is a Bargain Book Copy, purchased direct from the publisher or distributor as excess inventory or a store return

The selection of books is the same! Shop on BookOutlet. NOTE: This title is a Bargain Book Copy, purchased direct from the publisher or distributor as excess inventory or a store return. The book is in new condition and will, in most cases, have a small dot or line on the edge of the book. It may also have a price sticker on it from the original store it was returned from. In a rare case the actual cover for a book might not match the one in the display picture. For more information please refer to the information page Our Product.

Books related to The Scarlet Pimpernel (Collins Classics). A Tale of Two Cities (Collins Classics). 100 Books You Must Read Before You Die - volume 1 (Book House Publishing).

The Scarlet Pimpernel book. The Scarlet Pimpernel: A Classic That Doesn't Suck Sweaty Balls. Baroness Orczy was a playwright and this book was adapted into a play or the play was adapted into the book. I know not which was first. I can't usually make it through classic literature. It does have it's faults but still deserving of it's place in Odd's Fish ! Is this book an action adventure, a romance, historical fiction? Baroness Orczy has provided us with all that. Tis a fun romp, I say.

The first and most successful in the Baroness’s series of books that feature Percy Blakeney, who leads a double life as an English fop and a swashbuckling rescuer of aristocrats, The Scarlet Pimpernel was the blueprint for what became known as the masked-avenger genre. As Anne Perry writes in her Introduction, the novel “has almost reached its first centenary, and it is as vivid and appealing as ever because the plotting is perfect. It is a classic example of how to construct, pace, and conclude a plot. . . . To rise on the crest of laughter without capsizing, to survive being written, rewritten, and reinterpreted by each generation, is the mark of a plot that is timeless and universal, even though it happens to be set in England and France of 1792.”
  • Call me a hopeless romantic, but, more decades ago than I care to admit, I was smitten with this book and the 1982 film adaptation of it. I home-school our daughter now, and she is the age I was (12) when first introduced to this book, so I decided to give it a re-read and let her enjoy it for her last week of school. As an adult, and a fairly no-nonsense one at that, I was happily surprised with how the story enchanted me once more, and my daughter could not put it down, either. Set against the backdrop of the French Revolution, the hero (a mysterious character known only as "The Scarlet Pimpernel") daringly uses various disguises and other strategies to rescue aristocrats otherwise destined for Madame Guillotine. The book is full of intrigues and wranglings with questions like whether or not one life would be more valuable than another if it comes down to a choice. It has inspired plenty of good discussions in our home about the French Revolution, what it means to behave in a noble manner, and "what would you do" if you were in the position of Marguerite, a woman who must choose between the life of her beloved brother and the life of The Scarlet Pimpernel. The villain of the story, Chauvelin, tragically plays too close to the reality one can see around the world today...someone supposedly driven by ideals that seem noble in the abstract but show themselves to be nothing more than a sorry excuse to commit evil atrocities and violence in reality. Not only are we challenged to peek behind the mask to discover the identity of The Scarlet Pimpernel, but we are challenged to peek behind the mask of virtuous ideas used to cover the reality of extremism and hate. The story is old-fashioned in its sensibilities, so if you have no tolerance for that, you will not enjoy the adventure. Like any good story, it is very entertaining and goes down easily, but it has some treasured solid nuggets to ponder for those so inclined. It was a breath of fresh air for me to re-visit this fun but solid read, which promotes virtues like courage and self-control--the promotion of which I generally observe to be lacking in most popular entertainment today.

  • “The Scarlett Pimpernel” is an exciting historical fiction tale set in the Fall of 1792 during the French Revolution. The timing is not quite historically accurate, but the general theme falls within the “Reign of Terror” when the French people ousted their king, and brought ‘justice’ to thousands of aristocrats by way of the guillotine.

    The book was a little slow to get started while it spent time introducing the main characters in the story. There is a bit of a mystery as to the identity of The Scarlett Pimpernel, although it doesn’t take long to figure it out. From there, we learn about the daring exploits of 20 Englishmen noblemen – 19 followers and one mysterious leader – who set about the task of saving people from the guillotine by sneaking them out of France by any means possible. The mysterious leader, The Scarlett Pimpernel, gets his name from a piece of paper left behind whenever his band rescues someone, as the paper bears a small red flower found in England among other countries.

    I enjoyed the book, as it lauded the efforts of men who did not stand idly by while others were in need. I also enjoyed the tension the author developed around Marguerite St. Just, a beautiful French actress, who married an English nobleman. Much of the story is told from her perspective to include events on in both France and England.

  • The original has to be one of my all-time favorite tales, the first character in history to have a "secret identity". I bought this volume to read the sequels, but of course you must begin with the first, because several of the characters are revisited and there is added depth to them based on what they went through. I would say they go in descending order of excellence, like a gentle glide-path of enjoyment: "Scarlet Pimpernel" is a must-read, "I Will Repay" has some excellent exchanges and another terrific dilemma to negotiate, and "The Elusive Pimpernel" is merely a very good and readable yarn.
    Get it, read it. You will not be disappointed if you have any romanticism and love of adventure in your heart.

  • I’m always looking for great novels in historical settings to jack my middle schoolers up about history. Each time I read the masterfully-written The Scarlet Pimpernel, I see a new layer of genius in author Baronness Orczy. But would 12-year-olds be able to wade through the challenging vocabulary of one of my all-time favorite books? Could they catch the subtleties of the relational subplot in this fast-paced adventure novel?

    Yes and yes. Once introduced to the enigmatic hero, the Scarlet Pimpernel, who uses his wits and a series of unique disguises to rescue French aristocrats from the guillotine, my students were, like me, hooked.

    And what’s not to love? A broad pallet of well-developed characters, a classic, good-versus-evil mission, the pain of human weakness, and a subtle smattering of pleasing irony are satisfying at any age. With some well-chosen guide questions, this age group was able to unravel some of the causes and issues inherent in the French Revolution, explore themes such as deception, heroism, and the destructive nature of pride in relationships, and learn from the author’s use of setting and pace to advance her plot lines. As for the vocabulary, they washed it right down with a healthy dose of good, plain fun.

  • My son had this as a summer reading assignment. He whined so much I said I would also read it, it couldn't be that bad! It does have a bit of a slow start, but I enjoyed the story and was sad when it ended. I can see how a sequel would be warranted, I wanted to find out what happened next! I would suggest some kind of French Revolution for Dummies* if you aren't familiar with the events of the French Revolution. The book does explain a bit, but I found I enjoyed it more with the added knowledge.

    *History in a Hurry: French Revolution by John Farman" was what I read to supplement my lack of knowledge.