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ePub Beyond the Divide download

by Kathryn Lasky

ePub Beyond the Divide download
Author:
Kathryn Lasky
ISBN13:
978-0785783602
ISBN:
0785783601
Language:
Publisher:
Tandem Library (September 1995)
Category:
ePub file:
1508 kb
Fb2 file:
1574 kb
Other formats:
docx doc txt azw
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
343

Kathryn Lasky (born June 24, 1944) is an American children's writer who also writes for adults under the names Kathryn Lasky Knight and E. L. Swann.

Kathryn Lasky (born June 24, 1944) is an American children's writer who also writes for adults under the names Kathryn Lasky Knight and E. Her children's books include several Dear America books, The Royal Diaries books, Sugaring Time, The Night Journey, Wolves of the Beyond, and the Guardians of Ga'Hoole series. Her awards include Anne V. Zarrow Award for Young Readers' Literature, National Jewish Book Award, and Newbery Honor.

Beyond the Divide book. Meribah Simon can no longer live at home. The Amish community she. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

BooksLiterary Work of Kathryn Lasky. Want to learn about upcoming books? please join our mailing list!

BooksLiterary Work of Kathryn Lasky. In 1849, a fourteen-year-old Amish girl joins a wagon train west with her father after he has been shunned by their community. Join the Mailing List. Your personal information will remain private.

Kathryn Lasky (born June 24, 1944) is an American author whose work includes several Dear America books, the Royal Diaries books, Sugaring Time, The Night Journey, the Guardians of Ga'Hoole series.

Kathryn Lasky (born June 24, 1944) is an American author whose work includes several Dear America books, the Royal Diaries books, Sugaring Time, The Night Journey, the Guardians of Ga'Hoole series, and the Wolves of the Beyond series. Kathryn Lasky is the Newbery Honor author of over one hundred fiction and nonfiction books for children and young adults

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Bestselling author Kathryn Lasky writes for the chapter-book set! The Deadlies are like any other family with a loving mother and bright, rambunctious children. Except they're spiders.

Join Rory and Ryder in their adventures in our world-and the world beyond the TV. Ryder Holmsby is the same age as Rory, the popular TV cartoon character her animator parents created. Bestselling author Kathryn Lasky writes for the chapter-book set! The Deadlies are like any other family with a loving mother and bright, rambunctious children.

Kathryn Lasky grew up in Indianapolis, and is married to Christopher . The Night Journey (1982 winner of the National Jewish Book Award for Children's Literature).

Kathryn Lasky grew up in Indianapolis, and is married to Christopher Knight, with whom she lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts  . Hawksmaid: The Untold Story of Robin Hood and Maid Marian.

In 1849, a fourteen-year-old Amish girl defies convention by leaving her secure home in Pennsylvania to accompany her father across the continent by wagon train. Beyond the Divde" is a great book, intended for mature readers. Will Simon has been shunned by his Amish community and is planning to go to California. His daughter Meribah travels with him and this is her story on the trip on the emigrant trail during the Gold Rush. They join a company and Meribah becomes friends with a rich girl name Serena Billings. This book is packed with emotion, information, and action.

The Night Journey (1982 winner of the National Jewish Book Award for Children's Literature).

Kathryn Lasky grew up in Indianapolis, and is married to Christopher Knight, with whom she lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts Her awards include being the 2011 winner of the Anne V. Zarrow Award for Young Readers' Literature.

Kathryn Lasky is an American author of children’s novels and non-fiction books. She writes the Guardians of Ga’Hoole, Wolves of the Beyond, Daughters of the Sea and several other series, along with many series she has contributed to, such as Dear America and The Royal Diaries. When Lasky writes for adults, she uses her married name of Kathryn Lasky Knight or the pen name . Kathryn grew up in Indianapolis, Indiana. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Michigan and her Master’s degree in Early Childhood Education from Wheelock College.

  • I really wish Ms. Lasky had written a sequel and am kind of glad she didn't. I love the ending, as tantalizing as it is.

    I am a lifelong resident of California (I won't say native Californian) who is fascinated with history and especially the Gold Rush. The story of Meribah leaving her Amish community and heading west with her shunned father toward the Gold Rush is the story of a hard coming of age. I can't comment as to the accuracy of the portrayal of Amish culture; I know very little about it. The reviewer who gave it one star because an Amish girl would "never" rebel -- well, just look at the history of repressive religious communities. Girls rebel all the time. These days, they write very successful and inspiring books about it. Meribah was born too soon to write "Escape" or "Stolen Innocence", but Ms. Lasky doesn't focus on that aspect anyway. Instead she gives us Meribah's journey from naivete and innocence to survival and determination. Meribah pays a heavy price, but gains more. This is a Hero's Journey, with a strong, intelligent, brave girl as the Hero, much like Dicey Tillerman. Parents, read this to your little girls (when they're old enough -- rest assured there are no lurid details). Especially, read it to your little boys.

  • All Alone

    Have you ever had to choose between your loving father and the place you have lived for your whole life? Meribah Simon has. She lived in an Amish community her whole life, but now has left her home to search for gold with her father. On April 1,1849,Meribah and her father leave Holly Springs, Pennsylvania, to start their journey. Traveling in a covered wagon, they join the train and meet all kinds of people. Meribah becomes friends with Serena Billings, a rich girl traveling with her family. While Meribah draws, Serena paints. Not all the people are nice though. The Timm brothers are always making trouble. They meet up with some Indians but they just want to trade. One day Serena goes on a walk with Mr. Wickham. The Timm brothers go too, and something awful happens. At first no one will tell Meribah what happened and Serena will not speak to anyone. Finally Meribah realizes what happened and tries to help Serena get better. But she does not get better and one day just wanders off, never seen again. Her mother, wanting to find Serena, also leaves, never found.
    In August, Meribah's father gets sick. Meribah has to do most of the work, with some help from others. Then the Whitings get sick and Meribah and her father stay behind with them while the train moves on. Then the Whitings decide not to go on, so Meribah and her father move on. Finally they catch up. Then they crash and their stronger ox, Josie, dies. They are left behind to live on their own. They make home in a cave, and Will tells Meribah how to fix the wagon. Then someone comes to the rescue. It is Mr. Goodnough, an artist Meribah met in Saint Joseph. They join his wagon train and are on their way again. After awhile, Goodnough decides to stay back with Meribah because her father cannot make it.
    After a couple of weeks Goodnough decides to go get help. Soon after he leaves, Meribah's father dies. Meribah is alone.
    This book is good, but spread out too long. I think True North, another book by the same author, was better. It was more compact.

  • When an Amish man is shunned and suffering, he and his 14 yr. old daughter decide it is time to head West. The ensuing trip is fraught with unthinkable hardships, dangers, illness and death. The author is very careful to develop the characters who make up the center of the story, but the rest tends to drag a bit. If this young girl could do all the author says she did, then she is the indisputable heroine. The Amish community they left behind is never mentioned again in the book, nor is the wagon train's final destination...but where the author leaves off, one has a fairly good gut knowledge of the rest of the story.

  • This book is pretty bad, and it's really really wierd. If you enjoy wierd stories where you can't keep track of anyone's name (unless you read it more then once, and who would want to?) and everyone dies or dissapears, this is the book for you! Of course, who likes stories like that???? I liked the middle fairly well, but at the end, I didn't like it at all!!!!! The only reason I finished it was because I had to do a report on it for school. I told my teacher that the book was bad, and other kids did too. We got her to read it, and that decided her. She didn't like it either. Next year, she's going to do something different. Hooray!!!! I don't know a single person who likes this book. No offense to the author, but I don't know why it was published.

  • I read Beyond the Divide when I was 12. It is well-written and has haunted me ever since I first read it. Despite its intention for children, the book treats the hardships of pioneer life seriously and beautifully captures the coming of age of an adolescent girl. Because of the nature of some of the book's themes, I would only recommend this book for teens and above (or very mature younger readers). It is fast-paced and fascinating. Read it and you won't regret it!

  • This book was so BORING that I stopped reading it and didn't finish the end. I had to read this book for my summer reading project. It's about this girl named Meribah. She goes with her father when he joins the gold rush because he was shunned from the community.Warning:DO NOT READ THIS BOOK OR YOU'LL NEVER FINISH!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • This book was, I admit, boring at the beginning. I had trouble staying awake through the first few chapters. As I read on though, I became more interested in the vivid storyline and began to get an image of what pioneer life was like back then. Once the book became interesting, I had trouble putting it down. I recommend this book to older children, as it does deal with some mature issues.

  • I think this book gives a lot of information about life back then. I like how it focuses on one individual's life, but also tells about the other people on the wagon train. I think that it's interesting, exciting, and would hold anyone's attention.