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ePub Sister Gin download

by Jane Marcus,June Arnold

ePub Sister Gin download
Author:
Jane Marcus,June Arnold
ISBN13:
978-1558610101
ISBN:
1558610103
Language:
Publisher:
The Feminist Press at CUNY (January 1, 1993)
Category:
Subcategory:
Literature & Fiction
ePub file:
1479 kb
Fb2 file:
1755 kb
Other formats:
lit txt mbr docx
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
628

June Arnold should be known much better

June Arnold should be known much better. One person found this helpful.

June Arnold, Jane Marcus (Afterword). Arnold's literary experiments got away from her in some of her other works, but here I thought she really nailed it. So many good books came out of Daughters Press.

June Arnold (October 27, 1926 – March 11, 1982) was an American novelist and publisher, known for her novel Sister Gin and the posthumous novel Baby Houston. Arnold's own writing, such as Sister Gin, and the books she published through her press, Daughters, Incorporated, focused on telling the stories of lesbian lives and relationships. Arnold was born June Fairfax Davis on October 27, 1926, to Robert Cowan Davis and Catherine ("Cad") Carter Wortham in Greenville, South Carolina

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Sister Jane Arnold, esteemed master of the Jefferson Hunt Club. I have read each book at least. 3 times since i read the first several years ago. I love everything about the books-the mysteries, the characters, the philosophizing, the love. I would give my eye teeth to ride out on a foxhunt tho, I have 5 Yorkies and 2 Shih tzus instead of foxhounds but I love them every bit as much as Jane loves her animals. I am so looking forward to SCARLET FEVER.

Jane Marcus (1938–2015) was a pioneering feminist literary scholar, specializing in women writers of the Modernist era, but especially in the social and political context of their writings. Focusing on Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, and Nancy Cunard,. Focusing on Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, and Nancy Cunard, among many others, she devised groundbreaking analyses of Woolf's writings, upending a generation of criticism that ignored feminist, pacifist, and socialist themes in much of Woolf's work and critique of imperialism and bourgeois society.

June Arnold A group of elderly female vigilantes take local rape deterrence into their own hands. I have always loved reading. I used to beg my sister to let me read all her old books

June Arnold A group of elderly female vigilantes take local rape deterrence into their own hands. Sister Gin by June Arnold. Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY (January 1, 1993). Discover ideas about Sisters. I used to beg my sister to let me read all her old books. When i worked at Fat face in York, the area manager brought in this Mark Manson book for me and my assistant manager to read as he told us we cared too much. Books Worth Reading Woman T-shirts caped wonder woman t shirt dc comics. Have you spent all your life being the average fangirl/boy?

The author analyzes June Arnold’s Sister Gin (1975) as an exceptional work that disrupts the dichotomous juxtaposition of older predators versus younger victims, prominent in earlier representations.

The author analyzes June Arnold’s Sister Gin (1975) as an exceptional work that disrupts the dichotomous juxtaposition of older predators versus younger victims, prominent in earlier representations. Building on Roberta Maierhofer’s approach of reading menopause as a catalyst for becoming conscious of one’s own identity, the chapter discusses Sister Gin’s instrumentalization of menopause as a trigger for rethinking (re-)productivity and decline.

Afterword for Sister Gin. Jane Marcus. The Woman-Identified Woman. The book explores the relationship between embodiment and the production of the key structures which frame agency to map out potential for social change

Afterword for Sister Gin. Women’s Liberation Movement and Print Culture. The book explores the relationship between embodiment and the production of the key structures which frame agency to map out potential for social change. It uses modalities of ageing embodiment in the context of sport participation in later life, specifically Master athletics, including barriers, opportunities and physiological dimensions.

June Arnold was an American novelist and publisher, known for her novel Sister Gin . Arnold"s own writing, such as Sister Gin, and the books she published through her press, Daughters, Incorporated, focused on telling the stories of lesbian lives and relationships.

June Arnold was an American novelist and publisher, known for her novel Sister Gin and the posthumous novel Baby Houston. She went to Kincaid School in Houston, Texas, before going to Shipley in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. She earned her Bachelor of Arts from Rice Institute (now Rice University) in Houston in 1948, and went on to earn her Master of Arts in literature from Rice in 1958. The couple had four children before divorcing.

  • Highly original and entertaining

    I bought this book because it is recommended reading by Tee A. Corinne in her book `Dreams of the Woman Who Loved Sex" where she writes, "I have always treasured June Arnold's poetic description of aging and sexuality."

    This is a don't miss book -

    Book Description - Aging, lesbian consciousness, the difficulty of escaping from alcoholism -- these are the themes of June Arnold's extraordinary novel, first published in 1975. The novel stands squarely in the southern literary tradition, depicting with memorable hilarity a group of elderly female vigilantes who take local rape deterrence into their own hands. Critics and fellow writers have lauded it as a classic of experimental fiction. It is also a unique exploration of menopause as rebirth.

    From Publishers Weekly - Lovers Su and Bettina--and their network of elderly relatives and friends--confront aging, alcoholism, menopause, disillusionment and lesbian identity in North Carolina, 1974. Arnold's ( Baby Houston ) long-out-of-print [...] novel is predominantly vague and impressionistic, but certain episodes are stunningly honest and memorable for distilling the essence of women's interior lives. While each has bouts with self-loathing ("She's thin. Does she know what getting dressed is like if you're fat?") and shock of aging ("It was a terrible thing that the mind knew no age at all, could dart from seventy-seven to thirty-two in a fraction of a second without oneself ever being aware"), the characters function best as symbols of a woman's need to come to terms with her true desires. The menopausal experience is central to the plot as the pivotal though awkward passage to rebirth "as soon as a woman's body stops being under the moon's dominion. The child and the old don't go by clocks and don't know fear. Time took away the child and only time can give her back." Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

  • I bought this book because it is recommended reading by Tee A. Corinne in her book `Dreams of the Woman Who Loved Sex" where she writes, "I have always treasured June Arnold's poetic description of aging and sexuality."

    This is a don't miss book -

    Book Description - Aging, lesbian consciousness, the difficulty of escaping from alcoholism -- these are the themes of June Arnold's extraordinary novel, first published in 1975. The novel stands squarely in the southern literary tradition, depicting with memorable hilarity a group of elderly female vigilantes who take local rape deterrence into their own hands. Critics and fellow writers have lauded it as a classic of experimental fiction. It is also a unique exploration of menopause as rebirth.

  • I'm glad this important book was re-issued. June Arnold should be known much better.

  • I got this book for my Lesbian Lit class, and I found it to be quite humorous at times. Quite a story!

  • At the risk of sounding sexist, there is a warning I must issue to all intersted parties. THIS BOOK IS NOT FOR MEN TO READ. As a male reader, I was thoroughly lost on several occasions. For example, being a man, I cannot relate to or comprehend hot flashes (i.e. the dinnner scene). I am sure some women will protest, but this IS a book for lesbian women written by a lesbian woman. (To keep from being discredited, let me make it clear that I am gay myself, thus the brand of homophobic will not hold water).
    The overall style of the book is quite different, which in this case means quite dry. I was already bored with the novel by page 20, but still read on.
    Then, out of nowhere, there is a personal attack on Joyce Carolyn Oates. This was highly inappropriate and not needed. The fake reviewer could easily have written about a fake author. Few people read Oates as it is; she doesn't need more negative press.
    In short, this book is to be avoided by men.

  • As an undergrad at a major American university which shall remain nameless, I had the misfortune of being trapped in a painfully P.C. course on American women novelists of the 20th century. "Sister Gin" was the token lesbian novel -- and the only truly worthwhile book on the syllabus.
    Sister Gin has it all: a book-reviewing protagonist who does a scathing critique of Joyce Carol Oates, vigilante justice dealt out by a bunch of old women, a truly subversive intergenerational love affair, and much heavy drinking (along with an amusing explanation of why killing brain cells with alcohol can be a good thing.)
    Oh, yeah, and a discussion on the semantics of mashed potatoes. What more could you want from a novel?