mostraligabue
» » The Picture of Dorian Gray (Whole Story)

ePub The Picture of Dorian Gray (Whole Story) download

by Oscar Wilde

ePub The Picture of Dorian Gray (Whole Story) download
Author:
Oscar Wilde
ISBN13:
978-0670894956
ISBN:
0670894958
Language:
Publisher:
Viking Juvenile (April 23, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Literature & Fiction
ePub file:
1504 kb
Fb2 file:
1689 kb
Other formats:
azw mbr doc rtf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
275

Home Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray. HTML version by Al Haines. The picture of dorian gray. I don't know what it means. The story is simply this. Two months ago I went to a crush at LadyBrandon's.

Home Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray. The picture of dorian g. .The Picture of Dorian Gray, . 1890, 13-CHAPTER VERSION. You know we poor painters have to show ourselves in societyfrom time to time, just to remind the public that we are not savages. With an evening coat and a white tie, as you told me once, anybody,even a stock-broker, can gain a reputation for being civilized.

Home Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray He discovered wonderful stories, also, about jewels. He discovered wonderful stories, also, about jewels.

Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray The Preface The artist is the creator of beautiful things. Dorian Gray? Is that his name? asked Lord Henry, walking across the studio towards Basil Hallward. Yes, that is his name. To reveal art and conceal the artist is art’s ai. he critic is he who can translate into another manner or a newmaterial his impression of beautiful things. The highest as the lowest form of criticism is a mode of autobiography. Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming.

The Picture of Dorian Gray is a Gothic and philosophical novel by Oscar Wilde, first published complete in the July 1890 issue of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine.

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde is the story of moral corruption by the means of aestheticism. In the novel, the well meaning artist Basil Hallward presets young Dorian Gray with a portrait of himself. After conversing with cynical Lord Henry Wotton, Dorian makes a wish which dreadfully affects his life forever. If it were I who was to be always young, and the picture that was to grow old! For that I would give everything! Yes, there is nothing in the whole world I would not give! I would give my soul for that (Wilde 109).

Oscar Wilde was born on October 16, 1854, to the Irish nationalist and . When the book The Picture of Doran Gray was released it was censured by critics as being an immoral book.

Oscar Wilde was born on October 16, 1854, to the Irish nationalist and writer Speranza Wilde and the doctor William Wilde. After graduating from Oxford in 1878, Wilde moved to London, where he became notorious for his sharp wit and flamboyant style of dress. The story itself is, of course, fascinating, and the whole premise is quite brilliant, but for this reader, multiple pages spent itemizing and describing whatever Dorian's "current interest" happened to be (stones, fabrics, artwork, whatever) merely served to get in the way of the story.

After some time Dorian Gray looked up. "You have explained me to myself, Harry . Hallward was thunderstruck. He looked at Dorian Gray in absolute amazement. He had never seen him like this before. "You have explained me to myself, Harry," he murmured, with something of a sigh of relief. I felt all that you have said, but somehow I was afraid of it, and I could not express it to myself. I remember picking up a little vellum-covered book in your studio one day and chancing on that delightful phrase. Well, I am not like that young man you told me of when we were down at Marlow together, the young man who used to say that yellow satin could console one for all the miseries of life. The lad was actually pallid with rage.

Of Dorian Gray’s relationship to autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter . Dorian semi-consciously makes Faustian bargain to transfer all his sins and signs of age to his portrait

Of Dorian Gray’s relationship to autobiography, Wilde noted in a letter, Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry what the world thinks me: Dorian what I would like to be-in other ages, perhaps. While this story is often mentioned among the classics of the Horror genre (which I do have a problem with) this is much more a study of the human monster than it is some boogeyman. Dorian semi-consciously makes Faustian bargain to transfer all his sins and signs of age to his portrait. He sins and feels guilty about it, but keeps doing it anyway.

For years, Dorian Gray could not free himself from the influence of this book. And, indeed, the whole book seemed to him to contain the story of his own life, written before he had lived it. In one point he was more fortunate than the novel's fantastic hero.

The collection of popular and less-known quotes from the controversial novel "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by famous .

The collection of popular and less-known quotes from the controversial novel "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by famous Irish writer Oscar Wilde. The Picture of Dorian Gray is a worldwide-known novel by a famous Irish writer Oscar Wilde. By the way, it’s also the only published novel in his heritage.

Featuring stunning illustrations and supplemental information, from biographies about the author and his contemporaries to the London art world in the late nineteenth century, Oscar Wilde's classic story of a fashionable young man who achieves eternal youth while his portrait ages, reflecting the ugliness of his criminal misdeeds, is brought to life. Simultaneous.
  • This was easily one of the best books I have ever read. This book was written over a century ago and still remains popular and insightful. Oscar Wilde’s perception of humanity is, in my opinion, spot on. Every word of this book has depth and meaning.
    I absolutely despise Dorian Gray, but I am sure that was Wilde’s intention. How could you like a man that is so selfish, narcissistic, and obsessed with his own youth and beauty at the cost of all others around him? Dorian truly represents the ugliest that humanity has to offer, and I am happy that he pays for his sins in a fairly poetic nature.
    To lighten the serious tones of this book is Lord Henry, easily my favorite character. Nearly every line he speaks is a life-quote and his character gives insight to Wilde’s own thoughts regarding the world and the people in the world. A few of my favorites:
    “To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.”
    “The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it. Resist it & your soul grows sick with longing for things it has forbidden itself.”
    “Some things are more precious because they don’t last long.”

    I liked this book so much that I want to re-read it immediately :).

  • I am getting very tired of ordering what I think are professionally prepared books and finding that they are print-on-demand works probably put together by one person that do not adhere to certain standards of the book industry.

    In this case, the title refers to "other writings" but it does not seem to contain any other writings. In any case, it is hard to tell because there is no table of contents. Chapters do not begin on a new page but (to save money) a new chapter will begin anywhere on the page.

    Sometimes there are smart quotes. Sometimes there are unformatted quotation marks.

    Margins are very close to the edges of the pages, again to save money.

    Most troubling, the original Bantam edition was about 450 pages; this edition is 190 pages.

    So, I would recommend you go with a name brand publisher instead of ordering this version.

    Why did I not give it one or two stars? Because I did not notice typos and the entire text of "The Picture of Dorian Gray" appears to be contained here, plus the front and back covers, which contain old portraits of the author, are attractive.

  • This is a ‘dark’ novel in the Gothic style, cleverly told with all the wit of Oscar Wilde. Artist Basil Hallward paints a full-size likeness of a new and admired young friend of his, a Mr. Dorian Gray. Amidst a flurry of clever, witty, philosophical repartee ongoing between Gray and (visitor to Hallward’s studio) Lord Henry Wotton, Dorian wistfully wishes to stay young and let his portrait age: “…it were I who was to be always young and the picture that was to grow old! For that for that—I would give everything! Yes, there is nothing in the whole world I would not give! I would give my soul for that!” This becomes his ‘curse’.

    The novel is full of the hedonist thoughts of Lord Henry which corrupt Gray to a life of debauchery. Wilde is quoted as saying, “Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry is what the world thinks of me: Dorian is what I would like to be—in other ages, perhaps.”

    And, so this read will give, more than most novels, a glimpse at its author. This is a short and easily readable novel that acts as a platform to carry some serious philosophical opinions and observations of Lord Henry (Wilde?) - some of which are surely out of date in the 21st century. Here is an interesting musing from Lord Henry…

    “Modern morality consists in accepting the standard of one’s age. I consider that for any man of culture to accept the standard of his age is a form of the grossest immorality.” This read will illustrate that misogyny and anti-Semitism were a large part of the ‘standard’ of one’s age’ in ~1890 - so be willing to accept (hold your nose at) some of the author's observations and opinions, expressed through Lord Henry. But, even with its “warts”, it is a literary masterpiece and well worth a read!