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ePub Strength Training For Fencers download

by Harry James

ePub Strength Training For Fencers download
Author:
Harry James
ISBN13:
978-0978902209
ISBN:
0978902203
Language:
Publisher:
SKA SwordPlay Books (January 10, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Exercise & Fitness
ePub file:
1263 kb
Fb2 file:
1317 kb
Other formats:
docx lit txt mobi
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
276

Strength Training For Fencers book.

Strength Training For Fencers book. Harry James is a certified fitness trainer, a fencer, and the long-time fencing The first - and only - book written by a fencer for fencers, this book takes you through every step of the strength training process from the core to each of the muscle groups, and from static to dynamic and balance-challenging exercises. It's a must for the library of every serious fencer. Harry James is a certified fitness trainer, a fencer, and the long-time fencing coach at Somerville High School in New Jersey.

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The first - and only - book written by a fencer for fencers, this book takes you through every step of the strength training process from the core to each of the muscle groups, and from static to dynamic and balance-challenging exercises. The book is profusely illustrated to clarify each stage of each exercise.

The first - and only - book written by a fencer for fencers, this book takes you through every step of the strength training process from the core to each of th. .The first - and only - book written by a fencer for fencers, this book takes you through every step of the strength training process from the core to each of the muscle groups, and from static to dynamic and balance-challenging exercises. Its a must for the library of every serious fencer.

As strength training fits under the umbrella of Sports Science and has many other disciplines relevant to it, such as nutrition, flexibility and mobility, there are many good books on these subjects included too.

Sure enough fencers are to benefit from weight training, but so would any other athlete. Hi i'm reading the book "The Ultimate Guide to Weight Training for Fencing ". I realized a mistake in the first table of Weeks 9-12 routine in the year round fencing program.

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Strength Training For Fencers. ISBN 9780978902209 (978-789022-) Softcover, SKA SwordPlay Books, 2007. Find signed collectible books: 'Strength Training For Fencers'. Founded in 1997, BookFinder

The first - and only - book written by a fencer for fencers, this book takes you through every step of the strength training process from the core to each of the muscle groups, and from static to dynamic and balance-challenging exercises. It's a must for the library of every serious fencer. Harry James is a certified fitness trainer, a fencer, and the long-time fencing coach at Somerville High School in New Jersey. The book is profusely illustrated to clarify each stage of each exercise.
  • This book started out with such promise. I debated between two and three stars

    The first 40 pages of the book had great information about what is going on with your body as you train.
    Why to start off a certain way, how to be safe and how to build on what you have been doing.
    What is important to a Fencer and why.

    Then it just falls apart.

    The author says nothing about using machines for strength training. As an athlete getting back into fencing after a long time, I wanted to spend the winter on strength, flexibility and endurance so I would be ready to fence with a decreased chance of injury in about 4-6 months. The author talks about building instability into your training - it seems starting off safely with exercise machines and then transitioning to free weights would allow one to get some basic strength and get used to certain motions first. THERE IS NO GUIDE TO USING WEIGHT MACHINES as part of program.

    The author basically says machines are not like real life and one should be using free weights, elastics and exercise balls etc. He then proceeds to say that all this needs to be done with someone else there to spot you. UNREALISTIC! MOST ADULTS WHO CAN STOP AT THE GYM ON THE WAY HOME FROM WORK ARE GOING TO BE WORKING OUT SOLO.

    I would have liked to see a basic series of machines and an example of what a typical week or rotation over 6 days might be like. Something akin to Monday: Cardio on Treadmill followed by these machines at 20 reps. Tuesday Cardio on Stair machine followed by these machines at 12 reps -- or whatever the appropriate sequence might be.

    Overall possibly worth the money because of the great intro section but what I will have to do is show the exercises recommended to the trainer at the gym and let him develop a program that works those muscle groups.

  • This book is great in principle, but lacking in execution. The ideas and principles behind all the movements and how they apply to fencing is excellent. The ideas on how to take strength training and apply it in a productive manner and how that translates into fencing movements and skill is also excellent.

    However you would be better off looking for another source for demonstations of the movements described in this book. The examples on how to do various things (like squats, deadlifts, power cleans, even things like dynamic jumps and lunges) are described with not NEARLY enough detail. Movements like these, even when done as a beginner, even when done with very light weight, should be performed correctly. Building perfect form by starting with light weight, and getting LOTS of reps in with that weight will help build the motor pathways to make sure that as the movement gets harder (either in quantity or weight) or more dynamic (as applied to the actual sport of fencing), that your form will never be the place that falters.

    Basically anything in this book that actually involves using weights (barbells or dumbells) is inaccurate. Encouraging things like using the "Sting Ray" or "Manta Ray" to squat is also ridiculous. A better choice would be to simply learn to squat correctly. The descriptions for how to do a clean (or even what a power clean is... they get the definition flat out wrong) are not only poor, but incorrect, encouraging doing the motion in the wrong order and catching the weight in the wrong place. This can result in wrist and elbow injuries. Discouraging squatting below parallel, which has been proven to be safer and stronger, is also just dangerous. Box squats shown in this book are an assistance exercise to regular squats, not the movement you should be concentrating on as a core of your workout. Until you can squat with perfect form without a box, box squats will just stunt your development of a strong posterior chain (again crucial to fast lunges and crouches in fencing).

    A good companion for this book would be Mark Rippetoe's "Starting Strength" which is EXCELLENT for learning the basics of the barbell movements and how they apply to nearly all sports. Big compound movements like this can have a profound impact on your overall training, as they work many muscle groups together and will greatly increase explosive power (crucial for fencing) and proprioception (your awareness of your body and limbs and their positions, also critical for moving quickly and being accurate with your strikes in fencing). This book goes over all the weightlifting movements in incredible detail and will help you use them to maximum effect.

    In summary, the book, the workout plans, and the ideas are great. However, PLEASE get another source for learning how to do any of the weight based movements, and many of the other dynamic non-weight based stuff could use some better examples too. Even youtube would be better.