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ePub Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain download

by Sue Gerhardt

ePub Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain download
Author:
Sue Gerhardt
ISBN13:
978-1583918173
ISBN:
1583918175
Language:
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (December 22, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Psychology & Counseling
ePub file:
1753 kb
Fb2 file:
1961 kb
Other formats:
txt mobi docx lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
902

She co-founded the Oxford Parent Infant Project (OXPIP), a pioneering charity that today provides psychotherapeutic help to hundreds of parents and babies in Oxfordshire and is now the prototype of many new ‘PIPs’ around the country. She is also the author of The Selfish Society (2012). Profoundly Enlightening Sue Gerhardt’s Why Love Matters is an important book that addresses the crucial issue of what we need to recognize if we are to be more understanding of ourselves and each other and promote the health and well-being of future generations.

Why Love Matters book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Sue Gerhardt's book Why Love Matters shows that early experience has effects on the development of both brain . Sitting in a room watching babies - what kind of proof is that? How can anyone know what a baby is thinking and feeling? Isn't it all just woolly liberal conjecture?

Sue Gerhardt's book Why Love Matters shows that early experience has effects on the development of both brain and personality that none of us can afford to ignore. It was Margaret Ainsworth, a Canadian psychologist, who first demonstrated a robust connection between early childhood experience and personality. Sitting in a room watching babies - what kind of proof is that? How can anyone know what a baby is thinking and feeling? Isn't it all just woolly liberal conjecture? Added to this, an entire generation of feminists hated attachment theory from the word go, accusing Bowlby of being against working women and wanting to shackle women to the home.

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How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain by Sue Gerhardt. How we measure 'reads'.

In the ambitiously-titled Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain (Brunner-Routledge), Sue Gerhardt has summarized current findings in neuroscience about the developing brains of infants and how that development is influenced by the infants' early attachment.

In the ambitiously-titled Why Love Matters: How Affection Shapes a Baby's Brain (Brunner-Routledge), Sue Gerhardt has summarized current findings in neuroscience about the developing brains of infants and how that development is influenced by the infants' early attachment experiences.

Why Love Matters explains why loving relationships are essential to brain development in the early years, and how these early .

Why Love Matters explains why loving relationships are essential to brain development in the early years, and how these early interactions can have lasting consequences for future emotional and physical health.

Why Love Matters explains why love is essential to brain development in the early years of life .

Why Love Matters explains why love is essential to brain development in the early years of life, particularly to the development of our social and emotional brain systems, and presents the startling discoveries that provide the answers to how our emotional lives work. Sue Gerhardt considers how the earliest relationship shapes the baby's nervous system, with lasting consequences, and how our adult life is influenced by infancy despite our inability to remember babyhood.

PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books.

Why Love Matters explains why love is essential to brain development in the early years of life, particularly to the development of our social and emotional brain systems, and presents the startling discoveries that provide the answers to how our emotional lives work.

Sue Gerhardt considers how the earliest relationship shapes the baby's nervous system, with lasting consequences, and how our adult life is influenced by infancy despite our inability to remember babyhood. She shows how the development of the brain can affect future emotional well being, and goes on to look at specific early 'pathways' that can affect the way we respond to stress and lead to conditions such as anorexia, addiction, and anti-social behaviour.

Why Love Matters is a lively and very accessible interpretation of the latest findings in neuroscience, psychology, psychoanalysis and biochemistry. It will be invaluable to psychotherapists and psychoanalysts, mental health professionals, parents and all those concerned with the central importance of brain development in relation to many later adult difficulties.

  • Profoundly Enlightening
    Sue Gerhardt’s Why Love Matters is an important book that addresses the crucial issue of what we need to recognize if we are to be more understanding of ourselves and each other and promote the health and well-being of future generations. This is a topic that should interest everyone because in one way or another we all contribute to what happens. The book presents evidence based on scientific research that supports the crucial role of relationships in the early development of healthy self-regulation. It describes how the ability to experience emotions with clarity and behave in constructive ways is rooted in what transpires in our immediate social context long before we have any awareness of what is happening. The book is well written and the presentation is entertaining covering not only the science but also providing vivid illustrations from the author’s clinical experience as well as from literature, film, and biography. The book underscores that it is during an individual’s most vulnerable months; namely prenatal life, infancy, and toddlerhood, that relationships have the most profound and enduring impact on our development. This is because during early life the brain is forming and becoming rapidly organized into functional systems whose structure and dynamics are not solely shaped by genetics. Exposure and experience drive genetic expression during time-limited sensitive periods and ultimately help determine whether our responses to environmental challenges or stressful circumstances will be more or less adaptive across situations.
    It must be acknowledged that the idea of time-limited windows of opportunity to promote maximum well-being is not a comforting notion. Unfortunately, the idea is supported by lots of evidence which is not to say that one cannot point to exceptions where individuals subjected to adverse circumstances emerge with admirable qualities. Such resilient individuals are not the norm and often they have benefited from some unexpected relationship. It is also the case that biological arguments are not readily embraced by many well-intentioned individuals who find such arguments to be dangerously deterministic explanations for human behavior and contrary to notions of voluntary choice and responsibility for one’s actions. However, dismissing the ideas put forth in this book would only serve to perpetuate societal neglect of children and families who are in need of well-timed support if they are to avoid adverse outcomes such as susceptibility to academic failure, depression, violence, criminality, and/or addiction. Here some may perceive that the author is casting blame when in fact she is clarifying what needs to be recognized if we want to be supportive in ways that are effective. Investing in the early years is simply the right thing to do and besides that it is estimated to be less costly than the alternatives. Again this is an important book with a message that perhaps is not entirely reassuring or easy to accept but one that is profoundly enlightening!

  • Great book. My childhood was explained to me in bits in pieces in this book and I was able to put it all together in the end.. It's actually like information keeps coming and there's no end to it. I got a broad perspective of what my baby life was like and it's helped so much. I recommend this to anyone who is trying to be a better guardian to a child or understand their "inner baby"--both.

  • If you are looking to learn attachment theory and how attachment during early ages is important buy this book but if you are a parent looking for a book to get help in understanding parenting don’t buy this book whatsoever. I am a working mom and didn’t find any help in this book to raise my baby. This is more of a book to a student who is studying psychology. This book definitly did not help but left me feeling worried because it talked more about the problem than the solution. It is good to talk about the problem but how about the solution? Solution that relates to modern day reality were moms have to work to make needs meet.

  • I spent the last 6 months caring for an infant (not my own) and during nap times in the rocking chair, I read this book cover to cover several times. Along with Margot Sutherland's The Science of Parenting, this is one of THE indispensable guides to infant care. A book with staggering political implications (see Gerhardt's more recent book, The Selfish Society: How We All Forgot to Love One Another and Made Money Instead), no one with responsibilities for the care of young children can afford not to read this book.

    An absolutely epochal work that has managed to go completely unnoticed in the US, where it is needed most.

    Note to author: I eagerly await a second edition of Why Love Matters, which should allow for the incorporation of the latest science on mirror neurons into the book...

  • This book really opened my eyes to the fundamentals of brain development in infancy. I had no idea how much the actual physiology of the brain is affected by infant experience, not just the psychological. Sources are well cited, ideas are well backed up in scientific research, and the information is presented in a way which benefits lay readers as well as researchers (with an introduction about brain structure and development).

    I suggest every parent-to-be get a hold of this book. One reviewer was dissapointed by the lack of specific exercises to play with. However, I don't think they are necessary because this book gives specifics about why certain strategies affect infants. I think understanding why certain types of parenting work better than others makes parents more likely to come up with the kind of adaptive spontaneous strategies which come out of such a way of thinking. You could also check out Brazelton for more specific info about exercises to do with your baby.

    As a side note, once you read this book and make decisions about parenting based on the exhaustive research cited within, you will not only feel more confident about your parenting, but you will be able to defend against attacks from helpful but persistent grandparents, in-laws, and friends - should you want to engage in such discussions.

  • Had to buy this book for class and was pretty satisfied with the explanation of attachment theory and how initial stages of life affect later issues that are attributed to the showing of love and affection in multiple areas of relationships. Would recommend this to anyone just starting out in the mental health/clinical field and working attachment theory, which will have to be addressed in clinical practice one way or another whether formally working with the theory in your agency or not,