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ePub Childhood, Family, and Sociocultural Change in India: Reinterpreting the Inner World download

by Uwé P. Gielen,Dinesh Sharma

ePub Childhood, Family, and Sociocultural Change in India: Reinterpreting the Inner World download
Author:
Uwé P. Gielen,Dinesh Sharma
ISBN13:
978-0195664607
ISBN:
0195664604
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (January 8, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Psychology & Counseling
ePub file:
1758 kb
Fb2 file:
1866 kb
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Rating:
4.8
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230

Hardcover: 192 pages.

Hardcover: 192 pages.

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oceedings{A, title {Childhood, family, and sociocultural change in India .

oceedings{A, title {Childhood, family, and sociocultural change in India : reinterpreting the inner world}, author {Dinesh senior consultant Sharma}, year {2003} }. Dinesh senior consultant Sharma.

Sharma, Dinesh ; Gielen, Uwe P. ; Published by Oxford University Press, New Delhi (2003). ISBN 10: 0195664604 ISBN 13: 9780195664607.

Sharma, Dinesh, ed. Childhood, Family, and Sociocultural Change in India: Reinterpreting the Inner World. New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2003. E-mail Citation . The subtitle refers to the approach of the book: questioning the relevance of Sudhir Kakar’s 1980 study, both because of its static nature-it depicts an unchanging mythopoetic worldview of India-and because of its limited data. The chapters of Sharma’s volume attempt to critique and also to fill in some of the gaps in Kakar. Sinha, Durganand, ed. Socialization of the Indian Child.

Cultural practices in India have been deeply influenced by the textured .

Cultural practices in India have been deeply influenced by the textured history of external influence. In present times, increased mobility, changes in occupation, and global influences are exerting new pressures on the enduring character of the Indian family. The authors in this book provide a retrospective critique of Sudhir Kakar's grand narrative on Hindu psychology and childhood.

In D. Sharma (E., Childhood, family and socio-cultural change in India: Reinterpreting the inner world (pp . Characteristics of holding patterns of play, and social behaviours between parents and infants in New Delhi. 115–137). Roopnarine, J. Talukder, . Jain, . Joshi, . & Srivastav, P. (1992). Developmental Psychology, 26(2), 867–873. Krishnakumar, . & Vadgama, K. (2013). Indian fathers: Family dynamics and investment patterns. Saraff, . & Srivastava, H. C. (2008). Envisioning fatherhood: Indian fathers’ perceptions of an ideal father.

Childhood, Family, and Sociocultural Change in India : Reinterpreting the Inner World.

Changing socio-cultural environment of india: how it impacts the business. What The parent child relationship in India has been hierarchy bound. Good parenting meant inculcating moral values and respect for discipline. Presented By: Nidhi Grover Nimisha Gupta Rahat Khanna Sandeep Kaushik MBA HR (2nd Sem). What is Society and Culture.

This book deals with the nature of sociocultural change in India and its relevance for the scientific study of childhood, family environments and the process of human development. The view developed in this book is an interdisciplinary one, with a focus on social, developmental and psychoanalytic theory. On the one hand, the growing Indian middle class appears to be in the process of aspiring to be authentically Indian yet thoroughly modern; and on the other, there remains a search for the authentic Hindu self, best represented by the Hindutva movement and the BJP achieving political power. From a social and psychological perspective, these cultural and political movements hope to expunge the harsh pain of the colonial legacy, while managing to fight off the stresses and strains of modernity. Both the inward looking and the outward directed components of the new Indian identity impact the domain of the family through parenting schooling and media, represented in the daily routines of socialization. The book addresses this challenge by working its way through psychoanalytic or developmental issues in order to arrive at a consensus between theory and observations on Indian childhood and personality development. Although this realm of experience remains relatively unexplored within the social discourse in India, the psychoanalytic works by Sudhir Kakar on the psychosocial tensions underlying Indian society offer a great landmark and a starting point. A unique and overdue study, this volume brings important debates previously aired only in relation to rather restricted audiences to a wider readership.