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ePub Gut Feelings: Short Cuts to Better Decision Making download

by Gerd Gigerenzer

ePub Gut Feelings: Short Cuts to Better Decision Making download
Author:
Gerd Gigerenzer
ISBN13:
978-0141015910
ISBN:
0141015918
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin Group(CA) (August 1, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Psychology & Counseling
ePub file:
1971 kb
Fb2 file:
1786 kb
Other formats:
mobi mbr doc mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
328

In Gut Feelings, Gerd Gigerenzer (director of the Center for Adaptive Behavior and. Cognition at the Max Plank Institute for Human Development in Berlin) sets himself the task.

In Gut Feelings, Gerd Gigerenzer (director of the Center for Adaptive Behavior and.

1 In Gut Feelings, Gerd Gigerenzer (director of the Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition at the Max .

1 In Gut Feelings, Gerd Gigerenzer (director of the Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition at the Max Plank Institute for Human Development in Berlin) sets himself the task of showing that the human mind is constructed in a similar way: it contains a collection of domain-specific cognitive mechanisms. It is written for a general audience and as such does a remarkable job.

In "Gut Feelings" psychologist and behavioral expert Gerd Gigerenzer reveals the secrets of fast and effective decision-making. For me, the theme is that humans take more short cuts to make decisions than we usually realise. He explains that, in an uncertain world, sometimes we have to ignore too much information and rely on our brain's 'short cut', or heuristic. Sometimes we do this for good reasons; sometimes with unwanted outcomes - but often with fully understanding why. This excellent book helps reveal why we take the short cuts. One person found this helpful.

For many years I have been influenced by Gerd Gigerenzer's arguments about the power of simple . But I have contrasting reactions to different parts of Gerd Gigerenzer's body of work.

For many years I have been influenced by Gerd Gigerenzer's arguments about the power of simple heuristics and the underlying rationality to many human decisions. His published collections of essays - Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart (with Peter Todd and.

In Gut Feelings psychologist and behavioural expert Gerd Gigerenzer reveals the secrets of fast and effective decision-making. He explains that, in an uncertain world, sometimes we have to ignore too much information and rely on our brain’s ‘short cut’, or heuristic. By explaining how intuition works and analyzing the techniques that people use to make good decisions – whether it’s in personnel selection or heart surgery – Gigerenzer will show you why gut thinking can change your world.

Gut Feelings: Short Cuts to Better Decision Making Author: Gerd Gigerenzer BOOK CONTENTS ‘Can following your gut feelings lead to some of the best decisions?' . Author: Gerd Gigerenzer.

Gut Feelings: Short Cuts to Better Decision Making Author: Gerd Gigerenzer BOOK CONTENTS ‘Can following your gut feelings lead to some of the best decisions?' ‘Can we trust our guts?' These are the intriguing, even if superficially naïve, questions posed in this book. Can following your gut feelings lead to some of the best decisions?’ ‘Can we trust our guts?’ These are the intriguing, even if superficially naïve, questions posed in this book.

It is written for a general audience and as such does a remarkable job. The book is enjoyable to read, does not require any particular background knowledge, and provides useful tips for further reading. GG’s first main goal is to explain the hidden mechanisms underlying intuition. According to him, the human mind contains a collection of domain-specific cognitive mechanisms: ‘simple heuristics’.

In Gut Feelings: Short Cuts to Better Decision Making psychologist and behavioural expert Gerd Gigerenzer reveals the secrets of fast and effective decision-making. A sportsman can catch a ball without calculating its speed or distance. A group of amateurs beat the experts at playing the stock market. A man falls for the right woman even though she's 'wrong' on paper

Gut Feelings: Short Cuts to Better Decision Making. Risk Savvy is a book in the behavioral economics & decision making genre. Other books in this genre include Thinking Fast and Slow, Predictably Irrational, the Signal and the Noise, works of Nassim Taleb

Gut Feelings: Short Cuts to Better Decision Making. Alchemy: The Surprising Power of Ideas That Don't Make Sense. Other books in this genre include Thinking Fast and Slow, Predictably Irrational, the Signal and the Noise, works of Nassim Taleb. It's very well written. It has a lot of interesting anecdotes and sound advice. It's fun and informative.

Think less - and know more. A sportsman can catch a ball without calculating its speed or distance. A group of amateurs beat the experts at playing the stock market. A man falls for the right woman even though she's 'wrong' on paper. All these people succeeded by trusting their instincts - but how does it work? In "Gut Feelings" psychologist and behavioral expert Gerd Gigerenzer reveals the secrets of fast and effective decision-making. He explains that, in an uncertain world, sometimes we have to ignore too much information and rely on our brain's 'short cut', or heuristic. By explaining how intuition works and analyzing the techniques that people use to make good decisions - whether it's in personnel selection or heart surgery - Gigerenzer will show you why gut thinking can change your world.
  • I breathed a sigh of relief as I read this book and it confirmed how I operate and think. Not everyone puts rationality and common logic on a pedestal when it comes to solving problems or dealing with the here and now.

    This book:

    - Explains in layman terms how gut feelings work with reference to the findings of scientific research
    - Confirms intuition as a proven legitimate problem solving tool for men and women
    - Demonstrates how we are hard-wired to resolve problems with simple rules of thumb that have evolved and been shaped by our environment
    - Explains how these simple rules of thumb help us grapple with an unpredictable future and how they prevail over rational deliberation and hindsight

    This is an easy read in short chapters and when I finish this book I'm very inclined to buy other books by this author.

  • One of the major unexplained gaps in the science of economics is the assumption that consumers are rational. Based on the assumption of rationality economics papers are littered with differential equations and other forbidding mathematics which describe how consumers make choices. But in the real world consumers don't solve differential equations in order to decide whether or not to buy a cup of coffee. This is a sticky problem. The standard rebuttal is to point out that the flight of a baseball can also be described with all sorts of forbidding differential equations. The fact that baseball players don't solve the differential equations which describe the flight of the ball doesn't mean that they can't catch! Baseball players must subconsciously approximate this mathematical process.

    Gigerenzer points out that the standard rebuttal is wrong. A baseball player couldn't hope to gather and process all the information about the flight of a ball in real time, even approximately. Instead they use what he calls the gaze heuristic: 'fix your eyes on the ball and adjust your running speed so that your angle of vision to the ball remains constant.' The interesting thing about the gaze heuristic is that it ignores virtually all of the information about the ball's flight and focuses on just one piece of information: your angle of vision relative to the ball. But that single piece of information is enough to reliably let people catch a ball.

    That in a nutshell is the concept of bounded rationality. Once you factor in the cost of gathering and processing information it becomes extremely irrational to make decisions by solving differential equations. Heuristics (AKA rules of thumb) are the way to go. They give you a lot more bang for your information-processing buck. Here is the truly radical part of Gigerenzer's book. If you were to simply claim that heuristics allow people to make decisions that are almost as good on vastly less information then I doubt many modern social scientists would disagree. But in fact Gigerenzer shows that heuristics can outperform the information-greedy favorites of the social sciences like multiple regression analysis and neural networks with back propagation.

    Another really nice thing about this book is that Gigerenzer is a very good writer with a very light touch. You will not find the heavy and ponderous writing that you normally expect from scholars. This book is an easy and fast read that belongs on the shelf of everyone interested in politics and the social sciences. You may also want to consider The Bounds of Reason: Game Theory and the Unification of the Behavioral Sciences (you can easily and profitably skip over the math).

  • -I gave this five enjoyable stars because several months after reading it, I often use the book's main points (unlike many other facile but forgettable books which are read, agreed with, and then used little).

    -As an example, I found the Fast and Frugal Decision Tree interesting and tremendously helpful in practical decisions (including ones relating to my Buddhist spiritual practice), and I often develop my own decision trees while approaching similar problem sets. The Decision Trees help me identify the main issues, discern the consequences, and nail down a good imperfect decision. I enjoyed his amusing discussions on Satisficers (those willing to accept a good decision and move on) and Maximizers (those wanting perfection, even at the cost of detailed analysis), and when to choose one method over the other (and when you don't). These concepts are neither unique nor original to the author but I found he explained them thoroughly and meaningfully.
    -Unlike other reviewers, I rarely found the book bogging down, and when I did I used the satisficer principle and just breezed through those sections. I found his writing and persuasive style elegant, clear, and sensible. The author appeared to dispense with the abstractions, which was just right for this book. Incidentally, I have subsequently found his name arising in descriptive articles on cognitive topics (his credentials are pretty solid. Neat.
    -So ... I look forward to reading some of his other works.

  • -

    Are we really that flawed that in order to figure out which pizza to order you need to do multiple regression analysis?

    Or do we survive (and have for millennia) because we are part of the order of things, and as such, have innately within us, the correct mechanisms to figure out things.

    Or, are these mechanisms outdated in Modern society?

    Gigerenzer makes a very compelling argument for, not against, Heuristics.

    We are not flawed beyond repair in our thinking process.

    But maybe some that espouse 'biases' are.

    We do not have (or need) a computer-like brain, or worse, have a moral dictate to be an efficient being (even when such an attempt actually makes us less efficient!)

    Highly recommended.

    ___

    This is an identical review to Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart (Evolution and Cognition Series) (Hardcover)

    I read both, either one or both work, up to you.