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ePub Modern African Wars (3) : South-West Africa (Men-At-Arms Series, 242) download

by Helmoed-Romer Heitman,Paul Hannon

ePub Modern African Wars (3) : South-West Africa (Men-At-Arms Series, 242) download
Author:
Helmoed-Romer Heitman,Paul Hannon
ISBN13:
978-1855321229
ISBN:
185532122X
Language:
Publisher:
Osprey Publishing (November 28, 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
Africa
ePub file:
1611 kb
Fb2 file:
1776 kb
Other formats:
mbr docx lit rtf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
101

Osprey - Men-at-Arms.

Osprey - Men-at-Arms.

Author: Helmoed-Romer Heitman Paul Hannon. This book examines modern African wars between 1964 and 1989, and includes detailed descriptions of the South African Defence Force, Angolan Forces, SWAPO, and the major units involved in the counter-insurgency campaigns. The text is enhanced by colour plates, maps, and numerous photographs.

This book examines modern African wars between 1964 and 1989, and includes detailed descriptions of the South African Defence Force, Angolan Forces, SWAPO, and the major units involved in the counter-insurgency campaigns

This book examines modern African wars between 1964 and 1989, and includes detailed descriptions of the South African Defence Force, Angolan Forces, SWAPO, and the major units involved in the counter-insurgency campaigns. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

In the third volume of the Modern African Wars series we have a new author: Helmoed-Römer Heitman. He is a South African defence analyst that has lectured about the subject many times and also helped in the development of South Africa's White Paper on Defence. His style clearly shows his military background and he did a great job in explaining the military operations.

The establishment of SWAPO (South-West African People's Organization) in 1960, sparked decades of guerilla warfare, mostly aimed at the South African military.

From the days of its occupation by South African forces under the Mandate System, to its first election in 1989, South-West Africa was a hotbed of revolutionary activity. The establishment of SWAPO (South-West African People's Organization) in 1960, sparked decades of guerilla warfare, mostly aimed at the South African military.

t area for Operation Askari and began liaising with the UNITA forces deployed around Chipolo. On 25 Nov 1987 a trooper from 32 Battalion was killed in action during a contact with enemy forces in south-eastern Angola.

Modern African Wars (3) book. From the days of its occupation by South African forces under the.

Men-At-Arms Series, 242.

Download books for free. Helmoed-Romer Heitman, Paul Hannon. This volume written by Helmoed-Römer Heitman and illustrated by Paul Hannon examines the history of modern African wars in South-West Africa

Download books for free. This volume written by Helmoed-Römer Heitman and illustrated by Paul Hannon examines the history of modern African wars in South-West Africa.

From the days of its occupation by South African forces under the Mandate System, to its first election in 1989, South-West Africa was a hotbed of revolutionary activity. The establishment of SWAPO (South-West African People's Organization) in 1960, sparked decades of guerilla warfare, mostly aimed at the South African military. This book examines modern African wars between 1964 and 1989, and includes detailed descriptions of the South African Defence Force, Angolan Forces, SWAPO, and the major units involved in the counter-insurgency campaigns. The text is enhanced by colour plates, maps, and numerous photographs.
  • Once again Osprey has done a great job on the subject of Modern African Wars. I now have all four of them and fit in just fine in my collection

  • Great references for uniforms, structure, major events specially in Numidia, Southern Angola were most of the major action occurred. Highlighting SA forces. I only wished they could have expanded more on the UNITA, MPLA, and FPLA forces. And maybe the Cuban and Russian elements. .

  • This book looks at the struggle in Namibia, from when the former German colony was a League of Nations mandate to it's time as a de facto South African territory to its independence. Folowing the independence of most of the former European colonies in the 1960s the terrorist organization which would become SWAPO began terrorizing the native population and leaders of South-West Africa. This level of guerilla warfare was at such a low level that it could be handled by local police augmented by some assets of the South African Defense Forces. However, with the abrupt independence of Angola due to Portugal's withdrawel from Africa SWAPO became a more serious threat, using Angolan base camps to launch large-scale attacks into the territory. Soviet, Cuban and Marxist Angolan assistance to the terrorists all served to make the threat that much worse. South Africa would be forced to launche "externals" against the safe havens and eventually against the logistics and infrastructure in Angola as well.

    This book is filled with information. It remarks on every single South African unit involed in fighting in SWA and Angola. It is so much information that there is no space for a clear narrative of the phases of the conflict and the various players in Angola. The photos are excellent and there is some great material on the mine-resistant vehicles used in this theater of war, but I would have preferred to see some of this material in a seperate Osprey book about South African MRAPs. Still, some excellent photos and original artwork. Definitely a great resource for a student of the African wars.

  • In the third volume of the Modern African Wars series we have a new author: Helmoed-Römer Heitman. He is a South African defence analyst that has lectured about the subject many times and also helped in the development of South Africa's White Paper on Defence. His style clearly shows his military background and he did a great job in explaining the military operations. On the military forces involved, however, not so much. His writing is too focused on South African Forces, and he mostly neglects the Communist forces. Although he does mention the Cuban presence, he neglects the Cubans in the "Opposing Forces" sections. Only mentioning that the Cubans used MiG-21 planes and that some Soviets pilots also took part in the fighting. The Cubans sent around 45,000 men to Angola and sizeble Cuban formations took part in the conflict, mainly as helicopter pilots, tankers and artillery units. Not a single picture of Cuban forces is present in this book, even though they would not be hard to obtain.

    The plates are expertly drawn, but are the most unbalanced set of plates in the series, with only three plates showing combatants not from South Africa, with many redundant and overlapping plates. There is very little difference between the four SADF soldiers depicted in plate section A, and plates A1 and A3 could easily be replaced by other more diverse representations, with plates A2 and A2 explaining the minimum differences in their texts. Plates B3, C3, E3, G3 (and maybe G1 and G2) could be easily omitted in favor of more relevant ones. Plate F3 also should not be in this book, as there is no difference in the Dog Handler's uniform and equipment from the other SADF and SWA personnel already covered with such an overlapping insistence. There is only one section of plates not covering the South Africans (plate section H). It is like the South Africans were the only fighting force on the conflict! Instead of wasting one whole plate just to show a medic with THE EXACT SAME UNIFORM AS EVERYBODY ELSE - as stated by the text itself - just to show a lousy piece of cloth that is not even a badge (and that could be easily depicted as an inset), the author should have shown at least one, ONE, Cuban.

    The only non-South African plates are H1 UNITA Captain, H2 SWAPO 'Detachment' (which is carrying an RPG-2, not an RPG-7) and H3 FAPLA Colonel. The South Africans were fighting in support of UNITA, but the plates give a perspective that the South Africans were fighting the war alone. UNITA had many different units inside its organization, and their only representation is a barely equipped Captain, that looks less equiped in 1988 than the UNITA officer from plate G3 of the second volume in 1974; even though UNITA was lavishly equipped by South Africa in 1988, while UNITA was barely holding it together in 1974. There is no representation whatsoever of the FNLA. The FAPLA Colonel is the only representation of the major combatant of the Communist war effort, and he is depicted with the JMMC brassard of the cease-fire. With sizeable armored engagements, it would be obvious to the author the necessity of including FAPLA or Cuban tankers in this book; the variety of Cuban uniforms and their visual appeal in contrast to SADFs plain uniforms should be an obvious hint towards the plates. As the text mentions the SADF killing several Soviet advisors in external operations, at leat one should be depicted in the plates. As the author decided to include a SADF pilot, a Cuban pilot should also be included instead of the Ops. Medic for all the reasons I stated above. Another unit neglected was the SADF frogmen that sunk Cuban and Soviet ships; they would make an excellent plate, and French SOF analyst Éric Denécé said that Soviet frogmen were sent to Angola in order to counter SADF divers.

    Probably to gloss over this starking imbalance, the author chose to use the three plates from the H section as the book cover; not only this is away from Osprey practice, it made for an ugly cover. Visual stimulus is one of the strong points of Osprey books, and a not-so-appealing cover is a shot in the foot. The plates should also have more unit badges as insetes, especially the Recce Commandos, 32 Bn and Paratroopers' badges.

    This book has a good text, very technical approach, good maps but is let down by unbalanced pictures, with the plates showing soldiers with the same featureless uniforms over and over again, while neglecting all the other forces involved in the conflict. For the text, 5 stars, for the plates, 3 stars. Not a solid one, but a good 4 stars.