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by Circe Dawn Sturm

ePub Blood Politics: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma download
Author:
Circe Dawn Sturm
ISBN13:
978-0520230965
ISBN:
0520230965
Language:
Publisher:
University of California Press (March 20, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1555 kb
Fb2 file:
1482 kb
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
291

Circe Sturm's "Blood Politics" is a thoughtful look at the factors which go into how the Cherokee people define themselves .

Circe Sturm's "Blood Politics" is a thoughtful look at the factors which go into how the Cherokee people define themselves- as Cherokees, as Indians, as citizens of the Cherokee Nation. Sturm takes on some controversial issues that remain hotbeds of political contention. When she does this, the book reads more like a novel, and I found it to be an entertaining and useful technique in making her point. Blood Politics" is highly recommended, particularly in light of the recent vote on the status of freedmen in the Cherokee Nation. 6 people found this helpful.

Circe Sturm takes a bold and original approach to one of the most highly charged and important issues in the United . Law of Blood Politics of Nation The Political Foundations of Racial Rule in the Cherokee Nation 19072000.

Circe Sturm takes a bold and original approach to one of the most highly charged and important issues in the United States today: race and national identity. Focusing on the Oklahoma Cherokee, she examines how Cherokee identity is socially and politically constructed, and how that process is embedded in ideas of blood, color, and race. Not quite a century ago, blood degree varied among Cherokee citizens from full blood to 1/256, but today the range is far greater-from full blood to 1/2048.

Sturm explores this issue of identity with the Cherokees of Oklahoma, to the point that hearing any labeling of them just makes you want to throw up. There's a charming scenario in this ethnography that highlights the issue perfectly: A full-blooded Cherokee women is at a Powwow watching a white, non-Cherokee friend of hers performing (with the dress garb and all). She is with her young son (also full-blooded Cherokee) who points to the man and says to her, "Look Mamma!

"Blood Politics offers an anthropological analysis of contemporary identity politics within the second largest Indian tribe in the United States-one that pays particular attention to the symbol of "blood.

"Blood Politics offers an anthropological analysis of contemporary identity politics within the second largest Indian tribe in the United States-one that pays particular attention to the symbol of "blood. The work treats an extremely sensitive topic with originality and insight. It is also notable for bringing contemporary theories of race, nationalism, and social identity to bear upon the case of the Oklahoma Cherokee. -Pauline Turner Strong, author of "Captive Selves, Captivating Others: The Politics and Poetics of Colonial American Captivity Narratives

Circe Sturm takes a bold and original approach to one of the most highly charged and important issues in the United States today: race and national identity.

Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. xi. 249 p. photographs, notes, bibliography, index. December 2006 · Anthropological Theory.

Mobile version (beta). Blood Politics: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Download (pdf, . 4 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Cherokee - For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation).

Bradley 5/6/04 8:32 AM Page 144 Page 144 PoLAR: Vol. 27, No. 1 Matthew Timothy Bradley Western Carolina University Blood Politics: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Circe Sturm (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002) Blood Politics addresses questions of deceptive simplicity-who is Cherokee, who is Indian, and who gets to decide?  . Blood quantum is kept in the foreground as the chapter then traces the rebirth of the Cherokee Nation, which began in 1946 with the federal appoint- ment of a leader, followed in 1971 by the popular election of a chief, and the 1976 adoption of a constitution.

Book Description: Circe Sturm takes a bold and original approach to one of. .

Book Description: Circe Sturm takes a bold and original approach to one of the most highly charged and important issues in the United States today: race and national identity. CHAPTER TWO Blood, Culture, and Race: Cherokee Politics and Identity in the Eighteenth Century. CHAPTER FOUR Law of Blood, Politics of Nation: The Political Foundations of Racial Rule in the Cherokee Nation, 1907–2000.

Circe Sturm takes a bold and original approach to one of the most highly charged and important issues in the United States today: race and national identity. Focusing on the Oklahoma Cherokee, she examines how Cherokee identity is socially and politically constructed, and how that process is embedded in ideas of blood, color, and race. Not quite a century ago, blood degree varied among Cherokee citizens from full blood to 1/256, but today the range is far greater--from full blood to 1/2048. This trend raises questions about the symbolic significance of blood and the degree to which blood connections can stretch and still carry a sense of legitimacy. It also raises questions about how much racial blending can occur before Cherokees cease to be identified as a distinct people and what danger is posed to Cherokee sovereignty if the federal government continues to identify Cherokees and other Native Americans on a racial basis. Combining contemporary ethnography and ethnohistory, Sturm's sophisticated and insightful analysis probes the intersection of race and national identity, the process of nation formation, and the dangers in linking racial and national identities.
  • This book is a well-written journey into the minds of what constitutes being "Indian" for average Cherokee citizens; and this proves to be no easy task. Additionally, this book touches on many different aspects of Cherokee racial politics while remaining accessible to non-anthropologist. And poses an interesting question: If the Cherokee Nation continues to rely on current racial policies will it lead to the eventual collapse of the Cherokee Nation itself? A lot has happened since this book, including the election (and re-election) of a non-white president. Given Barack Obama's popularity across Indian Country, it would be interesting to see how this new era in American society has impacted the Cherokee. If the author somehow happens to run across this comment, this reader would love to buy an updated, 2nd edition.

  • This work has two central themes and limited Cherokee history: (1) enrollees with more than 1/64th blood quantum, (author calls them White Cherokees), and (2) the lack of acceptance of Black Freedmen into the tribe.
    There is no mention of blood quantum needed for Cherokee tribal services.
    I am offended the author considers my 1/28th blood quantum "a card carrying Cherokee". Really?
    Writer assumes the blood quantum in the Dawes Roll is correct -- again, Really?
    It was a White world, is it not possible that some Indian people admitted only to
    the amount of blood that would allow them land or compensation?
    My mother, the 2nd of 8 siblings was raised on my Cherokee grandfather's allotment close to Park Hill.
    During the war days we spent every other weekend on this farm.
    THE ORIGINAL ALLOTMENT, dated 1906, IS STILL IN OUR FAMILY.
    I also have wonderful photos of my Cherokee ancestors, including the gggrandmother who came to Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears.
    Also, I, along with my mother and all her siblings and my cousins have inherited type 2 diabetes. Yuck.
    I'm slender, eat heathy, and have always been athletic -- where did this illness come from -- there is no history in my paternal family anywhere --
    it comes from my 1/28th Cherokee ancestry.
    All this and a thesis writer thinks I'm "a card carrying
    Cherokee"?
    I am very proud to call myself Cherokee.

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  • Circe Sturm's "Blood Politics" is a thoughtful look at the factors which go into how the Cherokee people define themselves- as Cherokees, as Indians, as citizens of the Cherokee Nation. Sturm takes on some controversial issues that remain hotbeds of political contention. Particularly on the subject of freedmen, Sturm captures a wide variety of thought.

    She is a skilled writer and anthropologist. Some of her writing in her opening was difficult for me to grasp, but this is my fault- not hers. I have a limited background in anthropology, and I am still trying to get my head around the notions of "contradictory consciousness" and "counterhegemonic resistance." Apparently these are standard terms in the academic world of anthropology, but I had to rely on Sturm to point out examples of them in Cherokee culture.

    Even if one does not completely follow "Neo-Gramscian Perspectives on Race and Resistance" (a subtitle in her opening), overall the book is easily readable and understandable for the lay person. I came away with a much broader understanding of the concept and power of blood and blood quantum in Cherokee heritage. I also have a better understanding of Cherokee religion, politics, language and social structure.

    Sturm includes some stories of her research told in the third person. When she does this, the book reads more like a novel, and I found it to be an entertaining and useful technique in making her point. "Blood Politics" is highly recommended, particularly in light of the recent vote on the status of freedmen in the Cherokee Nation.

  • Sturm provides thought-provoking insights into tribal indentity and shows how the idea of "race" changes and evolves over time. A variety of perspectives, sometimes quite humorous, into the obsession of blood quantum. Her stories throughout the book are welcome breaks from the sometimes stuffy academic writing. I think she neglects to mention that government documentatin of people's blood quantum is arbitrary and often incorrect, usually placing people's blood quantum lower than it actually is. Sturm also seems inexplicably harsh on the Cherokee Nation and in particular Ross Swimmer. Other than these complaints, this book is a great exploration of varying viewpoints.