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by Evelyn Lord

ePub The Hellfire Clubs: Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies download
Author:
Evelyn Lord
ISBN13:
978-0300164022
ISBN:
0300164025
Language:
Publisher:
Yale University Press (April 6, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1515 kb
Fb2 file:
1122 kb
Other formats:
rtf azw mobi txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
496

Includes bibliographical references (p. -242) and index.

Includes bibliographical references (p.

The Hell-Fire Clubs scandalised eighteenth-century English society. Rumours of their orgies, recruitment of prostitutes, extensive libraries of erotica, extreme rituals and initiation ceremonies circulated widely at the time, only to become more sensational as generations passed

The Hell-Fire Clubs: Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies. Most boring book about sex and Satanism ever.

The Hell-Fire Clubs: Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies. 0300116675 (ISBN13: 9780300116670). Juicy gossip was the whole reason I was interested in this book, so I'm probably not the target audience.

The Hell-Fire Clubs scandalized eighteenth-century English society. Rumors of their orgies, recruitment of prostitutes, extensive libraries of erotica, extreme rituals, and initiation ceremonies circulated widely at the time, only to become more sensational as generations passed

item 2 Hellfire Clubs by Evelyn Lord New Paperback, softback Book -Hellfire Clubs by Evelyn Lord New . Evelyn Lord has published widely on local history and is the author of The Knights Templar in Britain and The Stuart Secret Army. She lives in Cambridge, UK.

item 2 Hellfire Clubs by Evelyn Lord New Paperback, softback Book -Hellfire Clubs by Evelyn Lord New Paperback, softback Book. item 3 The Hellfire Clubs Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies 9780300164022 Brand New -The Hellfire Clubs Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies 9780300164022 Brand New. £1. 5. Country of Publication.

Evelyn Lord’s The Hell-fire Clubs: Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies removes the myth but leaves the mystery about an undercurrent of antisocial meetings and acts that began in the late sixteen hundreds and reached its peak in the early seventeen hundreds before dying out at the end o. .

Evelyn Lord’s The Hell-fire Clubs: Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies removes the myth but leaves the mystery about an undercurrent of antisocial meetings and acts that began in the late sixteen hundreds and reached its peak in the early seventeen hundreds before dying out at the end of the century. Dr. Lord’s thesis is that drink, sex and gambling cloaked in secrecy gave rumor to the devil-worship that remains largely unsupported. Instead, what is found is an often spurious launch of gentlemen clubs that last the lifetime or less of its founder/s

The Hellfire Clubs: Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies.

The Hellfire Clubs: Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies. Rumors of their orgies, recruitment of prostitutes, extensive libraries of erotica, extreme rituals, and initiation ceremonies circulated widely at the time, only to become more sensational as generations passed.

The book explores the social and economic context in which the clubs emerged and flourished; their various phases, which first involved violence as an assertion of masculinity, then religious blasphemy, and later sexual indulgence; and the countermovement that eventually suppressed them. Uncovering the facts behind the Hell-Fire legends, this book also opens a window on the rich contradictions of the Enlightenment period.

Britain’s Hell-Fire clubs had a fiendish reputation, but how much of it was true? Frances Wilson. September 23 2008, 2:22pm, The Sunday Times. The clubs, which appeared across the country like the mark of the beast, were rumoured to toast their diabolical leader and so confident were the Irish Hell-Fire members of the devil's approval that they saved him a seat at their meetings. One night he did indeed join them, bursting forth from the body of a black cat and shooting up through the roof of the building. Rumors of their orgies, recruitment of prostitutes, extensive libraries of erotica, extreme rituals, and initiation ceremonies circulated widely at the time, only to become more sensational as generations passed

The Hell-Fire Clubs scandalized eighteenth-century English society. Rumors of their orgies, recruitment of prostitutes, extensive libraries of erotica, extreme rituals, and initiation ceremonies circulated widely at the time, only to become more sensational as generations passed. This thoroughly researched book sets aside the exaggerated gossip about the secret Hell-Fire Clubs and brings to light the first accurate portrait of their membership (including John Wilkes, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and the Prince of Wales), beliefs, activities, and the reasons for their proliferation, first in the British Isles and later in America, possibly under the auspices of Benjamin Franklin.

Hell-Fire Clubs operated under a variety of titles, but all attracted similar members—mainly upper-class men with abundant leisure and the desire to shock society. The book explores the social and economic context in which the clubs emerged and flourished; their various phases, which first involved violence as an assertion of masculinity, then religious blasphemy, and later sexual indulgence; and the countermovement that eventually suppressed them. Uncovering the facts behind the Hell-Fire legends, this book also opens a window on the rich contradictions of the Enlightenment period.

  • Evelyn Lord’s The Hell-fire Clubs: Sex, Satanism and Secret Societies removes the myth but leaves the mystery about an undercurrent of antisocial meetings and acts that began in the late sixteen hundreds and reached its peak in the early seventeen hundreds before dying out at the end of the century. Dr. Lord’s thesis is that drink, sex and gambling cloaked in secrecy gave rumor to the “devil-worship” that remains largely unsupported. Instead, what is found is an often spurious launch of gentlemen clubs that last the lifetime or less of its founder/s. Often shut down once their existence is found out, these clubs provided the wealthy an outlet for experimental social behavior.
    Emerging at an extreme before falling into reputable silence, fear and chaos was London’s first experience with the members of these clubs. The Mohocks raked hell on the streets at night, permanently tarnishing the concept of secret clubs. Members, among whom are the famous John Wilmot. Drunk and looking for a fight, hell-fire members physically molested people in the streets and even the watchmen of the night. Often pulling lethal pranks such as slicing the faces of whoever opened their doors at night. This twisted usage of “Enlightened thinking” was just a license to cause havoc.
    As the eighteenth century moved forward, the clubs left the coffeehouses and alehouses and retreated to the privacy of homes and rented castles. It is with the Medmenham Friars that the clearest understanding of what possibly went on in some hell-fire clubs is found. Created by Sir Francis Dashwood, also founding member of the Dilettanti and Divan clubs, the Friars took on a monastery theme at a restored castle on the Thames River. The truth of their secret meetings is blurred by the eccentric journalism of the day. Most likely, it ws a place for the wealthy to get drunk and have organized sex, and not the satanic club that supposedly feed the Eucharist to an animal.
    Clubs continued to spread, involving men of politics and often interfering in their careers, such as the case with John Wilkes. The hell-hire clubs existed but were less pronounced in Scotland, the American colonies and further abroad. In Ireland, Protestant hell-fire clubs gained notoriety more because of the Catholic majority that despised the minority of Protestants than for any secret practices that may have existed.
    Evelyn Lord is the Secretary of the Emeritus Fellows Society at Wolfson College and the former Staff Tutor in Local History at CU Institution of Continuing Education. She received her Masters from the Open University and doctorate from the University of Leicester. She analyzes the literature left behind coupled with court records, which her training as a local historian enables her to deduce who might have been a member when and in which club. Because of the secrecy of the clubs, few records of solid evidence remain. As a historian, she reads between the lines and finds the probable truth in the lies created by journalist eager to make a shilling in the eighteenth century.
    Her analysis of the evidence is generally vague, providing few answers. She does however provide a context for what she does offer as probably answers and clearly attributes much of her understanding of Enlightened Britain to Roy Porter’s research. Her writing is clear but at times repetitious, reintroducing persons previously mentioned unnecessarily. However, the writing is dry and a labor to read. As exciting as sex, Satanism, and secret societies are, she does not deliver the accounts in a stimulating way. Two hundred and fifteen pages appear to be an easy read but instead, leaves the reader ready for it to end by the sixth chapter. A great area of study, that leaves the reader uninspired by the tragedy of the eighteenth century Enlightened Englishmen.

  • This book is NOT a work of Fiction. It is not a speculative list of the perversions and vices attributed to the Hell-Fire Club, otherwise known as "Order of the Friars of St. Francis of Wycombe"

    If the previous reviewers found this book to be too dry, non-sensationalist, and uninteresting to the current bottom-feeders trying to read "naughty history" then they need to pick up one of the several examples of "Yellow Journalist" on this subject that will appeal to their purile and scatalogical interests, or perhaps a collection of "Readers Letters To Hustler."

    If however, the reader is interested in following an extensively researched recounting of the Hell-Fire Club's British and French precursors, and extensively covering both the Duke of Wharton's and Sir Francis Dashwood's subsequent Hell-Fire Clubs they will be well rewarded with as much real history as may likely be found on the actualy subject, and not the sensationalist blackening of characters attempted by the yellow journalists of the day, and to this very day: The Hellfire Club was a Gentleman's Club, like many others of its day. And to understand these clubs, one need look no further than City of Laughter: Sex and Satire in Eighteenth-Century London so see that the Hell-Fire Club was not nearly so far from the social norms and mores of 18th Century London, as many of its moralist detractors claimed at the time, and still claim today.

  • I would not purchase this book it talks about secret societies but doesn't know anything about them it's all suggestions and possibilities no real proof of anything . Very boring read

  • Readers should consider Ashe's book also and draw their own conclusions.

  • While the subject was fascinating and the promised a lot in its title, I found it a bit of a slow read. With a subject like this you definitely want more story flow somehow and less academic. For me, this was a little too much like someone's thesis that promised sex and delivered a rather chaste good-nite kiss instead. Still worth reading, but now I want the fictionalized story to go with it.

  • To be fair to Ms. Lord, she did a lot of research. Otherwise this book is a nightmare of poor organization, structure, and pacing. It's quite possibly one of the most boring history books I've ever read, which is impressive given both its short length and subject matter. I'd recommend reading another book on this subject - even if it does, as Ms. Lord believes, make the history more titillating than the reality - because it's likely to be a better use of a reader's time. As for me, following Ms. Lord's painting of these clubs as precursors to fraternities, I have no desire to read another book on this subject (and wish I hadn't read this one).

    This book is a great example of having the research for a good book but not connecting it with the proper thesis and editing to make that transition.

  • I would venture a guess as to why this book is perhaps not shall we say accurate and somewhat watered down. Check out the publisher. None other than the home of super secret, super evil "Skull and Bones. Yale University.