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ePub The Secret War for the Union: The Untold Story of Military Intelligence in the Civil War download

by Edwin C. Fishel

ePub The Secret War for the Union: The Untold Story of Military Intelligence in the Civil War download
Author:
Edwin C. Fishel
ISBN13:
978-0395742815
ISBN:
0395742811
Language:
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1st edition (May 1, 1996)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1318 kb
Fb2 file:
1459 kb
Other formats:
doc lrf docx lit
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
444

Edwin C. Fishel began thirty years of service during World War II, working first as a chief intelligence reporter in the National Security .

Edwin C. Fishel began thirty years of service during World War II, working first as a chief intelligence reporter in the National Security Agency and later as the director of the National Cryptologic School Press. He lives in Arlington, Virgina. The good news, for prospective readers of Edwin Fishel's 1996 "The Secret War for the Union", is that the book has captured an enormous amount of material about the intelligence war between the Union and the Confederacy, much of which took place off the battlefields.

Focusing on intelligence work in the eastern theater, 1861-1863, Fishel plays down the role of individual agents . Fishel's book is one of the few Civil War history books that focuses exclusively on Civil War intelligence gathering.

Fishel treats intelligence as a continuum, one that in the Civil War included cavalry reconnaissance and the systematic interrogation of prisoners and deserters, as well as the use of local sympathizers to observe and report on enemy forces.

Start by marking The Secret War for the Union . This book described the Union's intelligence gathering efforts during the war through the battle of Gettysburg.

Start by marking The Secret War for the Union: The Untold Story of Military Intelligence in the Civil War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. It appears that this story was untold for many years to protect the identities of a number of the people involved; but intelligence analyst Edwin C. Fishel happened across the records of the Bureau in the archives, still bound up with red ribbons, unread for a century or more. The first part was slow as he talked about the beginning spying efforts. It wasn't interesting.

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Edwin Fishel is reported to have worked for more than thirty years in the field of secret intelligence. It should come as no surprise, therefore, that the jacket of his book is short on specifics about his background, noting only that he directed the National Security Agency's National Cryptological School Press. An ironic twist to this truism appears in The Secret War for the Union, in which Mr. Fishel offers new intelligence characters as interesting as Greenhow or Pinkerton but more likely to have contributed significantly to intelligence accomplishments.

At the end of the American Civil War, most of the intelligence records g hidden for over a century. As a result, little has been understood about the role of espionage and other intelligence sources, from balloonists to signalmen with their telescopes.

Excellent story on intelligence operations in the Civil War. By Thriftbooks. com User, September 2, 2006. I don't disagree that this is not a book for the common reader. It is for those individuals very specifically interested in the Civil War or perhaps the early development of America's intelligence operations. Fishel's book attempts to correct this deficiency. Fishel attacks three Civil War myths

Edwin C. He describes the actions of spies, scouts, signalmen, balloonists and others involved in supplying information as he relates how commanders used military intelligence to make tactical decisions. Fishel attacks three Civil War myths. Was General George B. McClellan really duped into believing he was massively outnumbered in the Peninsula and later at Antietam?

Even Attorney General Edwin M. Stanton, later Lincoln's secretary of war, had security problems; his office was so. .In this interview the awkwardness of handling military secrets in the situation of divided loyalties reached its peak.

Even Attorney General Edwin M. Stanton, later Lincoln's secretary of war, had security problems; his office was so riddled with Southern sympathizers that he had to walk to its entryway to have a confidential conversation with a Republican senator. Stanton, a newcomer to President Buchanan's cabinet, considered his position a vantage point for keeping an eye on Southern influence in the administration.

Among other accomplishments, it appears to have played a vital role in the Union victory at Gettysburg. This surprise-and a few others-await serious readers. 25,000+ items on line. In business since 1987. Core focus: better academic titles in all fields-scarce and rare

A former journalist and intelligence officer at the National Security Agency provides a definitive study of military intelligence during the Civil War, drawing on original, previously unknown sources to describe the various intelligence campaigns and their short- and long-term impact.
  • I bought this book to research a specific subject and found it to be VERY informative. It did give me a lot of what I was looking for - and gave me a good idea of where I can search further. Its NOT a new puplication but was written some 25- 30 years ago. It is really a history of Civil War Military Intelligence and Intelligence failures. PLEASE NOTE: It is also a very excellent summary of the progress of the war from Bull Run to Gettysburg.

  • Reading Fishel's book is like being allowed to peer through a time machine to a place never seen by any others before. That is literally true. Using newly discovered records and many primary sources, he illuminates the essential role played by military intelligence gatherers on the Union side during the Civil War. Rarely, if ever, has this been discussed in detail and never as comprehensively as Fishel has done here. Fascinating and essential reading.

  • Excellent, highly detailed account of intelligence activity in the Civil War. Fishel clearly conducted painstaking research, which is no easy feat when it comes to records from that era.

    To anyone looking for a reliable source on Civil War spies, I highly recommend this book.

  • great book

  • A little to much down into the weeds.

  • The good news, for prospective readers of Edwin Fishel's 1996 "The Secret War for the Union", is that the book has captured an enormous amount of material about the intelligence war between the Union and the Confederacy, much of which took place off the battlefields. Fishel had access to the records of the Union Army's Bureau of Military Information, which allows him to interpret the military history of the war from an intelligence prospective. Fishel was an experienced intelligence professional, giving him a sound perspective by which to evaluate the records. There are some real finds with respect to code-breaking and the struggles over estimates of the size of the Confederate Army.

    The less good news is that the author is not a great writer. The vernacular prose is offsetting, and the bulk of the book is a not entirely digested mass of material. This reviewer found the real payoff in the appendices, where the author attempts to summarize his findings. At nearly six hundred pages of text, this book would be a long effort for the general reader. The student of the Civil War may find it of more interest. Recommended to that audience.

  • In 1959, the author uncovered a previously unknown collection of U.S. government documents describing intelligence operations during the Civil War. These papers became the basis for his epic study of Civil War intelligence. Writing on Civil War intelligence is challenging, since the U.S. military's philosophy on intelligence was primitive and vastly different than today. The U.S. Army had no specialized intelligence structure, doctrine, training, personnel, equipment, or concept of operations.

    While the theory of intelligence or "know thy enemy" dates back to the dawn of warfare, it is unfair to compare modern views of intelligence with the 1860's. Despite this challenge the author fairly balances his analysis of both the Union and the Confederate use of intelligence.

    The author deserves credit for attempting to take a holistic view of intelligence and not simply talk of spies and secret operations. Extensive analysis is conducted on the use of observation balloons (early airborne reconnaissance) and stealing enemy flag signals (very early signals intelligence). The author even talks about the Union's attempt to condense, combine, and refine intelligence from various collection methods (early all-source analysis).

    While most Civil War accounts focus on battle, this work, like most real intelligence, focuses on the time between the battles. Civil War generals spent very little time actually in battle, and spent the great majority of the war either on the move, trying to figure out where the enemy was, or what the enemy was trying to do next.

    Be warned the book is not a quick read. The author's addiction to detail is so deep that I believe it near impossible for anyone to attempt to produce a more complete history of Civil War intelligence unless a second collection of unknown intelligence documents is discovered.