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ePub Policing the Poor: From Slave Plantation to Public Housing (Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law) download

by Neil Websdale

ePub Policing the Poor: From Slave Plantation to Public Housing (Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law) download
Author:
Neil Websdale
ISBN13:
978-1555534974
ISBN:
155553497X
Language:
Publisher:
Northeastern (September 13, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1713 kb
Fb2 file:
1292 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
869

policing, Neil Websdale contends instead that such law enforcement initiatives oppress rather than protect the poor. Series: Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and Law. Paperback: 289 pages. Publisher: Northeastern (September 13, 2001).

While many applaud the apparent successes of community and saturation policing, Neil Websdale contends instead that such law enforcement initiatives oppress rather than protect the poor.

Policing the Poor From Slave Plantation to Public Housing Northeastern Series on Gender, Crime, and. Gerald Miller.

Policing the Poor book He also notes that it overlooks the historical roots of crime and urban blight (p. 19.

Policing the Poor book. Neil Websdale’s 2001 book Policing the poor: from slave plantation to public housing (Northeastern University Press) examines the origins and practice of community policing in the black urban poor neighborhoods of Nashville. Websdale weaves sociological and historical analysis alongside the stories of public housing residents and those of the police who patrol them. He also notes that it overlooks the historical roots of crime and urban blight (p.

Causes & prevention of crime, Ethnic studies, Ethnography, Police & security services, Urban communities, Politics, Current Events, Nashville, Race And Ethnic Relations, Political .

Causes & prevention of crime, Ethnic studies, Ethnography, Police & security services, Urban communities, Politics, Current Events, Nashville, Race And Ethnic Relations, Political Science, Politics - Current Events, al Relations, USA, Police-Community Relations, General, Law, General, Tennessee, Discrimination & Racism, Criminology, Political Freedom & Security - Law Enforcement, Community policing, Discrimination in law enforcem, Discrimination in law enforcement, Police-community relations, Racism, African Americans.

suspicion-of normalized state violence and everyday surveillance (Websdale, 2001)

In disadvantaged communities with routine police presence, the hidden transcript is animated by the daily humiliations and harassments-routine stopping, frisking and questioning, the constant fear and suspicion-of normalized state violence and everyday surveillance (Websdale, 2001)

Policing the poor: From slave plantation to public housing. Boston, MA: Northeastern University PRess. A people's history of the United States: 1492 to present.

Policing the poor: From slave plantation to public housing. New York, NY: Harper Perennial Modern Classics. Also, I guess I should have done this to begin with: tl;dr: Racial issues surrounding policing is complex. As the dude from the Big Lebowski might say, there are "a lotta ins, a lotta outs, a lotta what-have-yous. Having said that, the evidence is pretty clear that race is still an issue in contemporary criminal justice.

Websdale, Neil (2001). Policing the Poor: From Slave Plantation to Public Housing. Boston, Massachusetts: Northeastern University Press. p. 60. ISBN 9781555534974. Erickson, Ansley T. (2017). Making the Unequal Metropolis: School Desegregation and Its Limits. Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago Press. 47. ISBN 9780226528915.

Policing the poor: from slave plantation to public housing. 226. ISBN 978-1-55553-496-7. 271. Retrieved 21 February 2012.

New York: Random House Vintage Books. Crime Prevention Unit: Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Websdale, N. (2001) Policing the Poor: From Slave Plantation to Public Housing. Brant Castellano, . Archibald, L. and DeGagné, M. (2008) From Truth to Reconciliation Transforming the Legacy of Residential Schools. Ottawa, Canada: The Aboriginal Healing Foundation. 2008) The neighbourhood context of urban Aboriginal crime. The Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice, 50(5): 523–557.

While many applaud the apparent successes of community and saturation policing, Neil Websdale contends instead that such law enforcement initiatives oppress rather than protect the poor, particularly African Americans in large urban centers. Based on a groundbreaking ethnographic study of public housing projects in Nashville, Tennessee, he argues persuasively that community policing is a critical component of a criminal justice juggernaut designed to manage or regulate stigmatized populations, much like slave patrols served as agents for social control on Southern plantations.

In a work that is sure to stir controversy and heated debate, Websdale draws on extensive field research, documentary sources, and interviews to illuminate how a criminal justice system deeply rooted in racism and slavery destroys the black family, creates a form of selective breeding, and undermines the civil rights gains of the 1960s. Unlike previous studies of community policing, which analyze programs through the lens of law enforcement, this book focuses on the history, experiences, and perspectives of the people whose lives are most affected by today's policing strategies.

Skillfully blending the voices of project residents with a rich synthesis of historical, sociological, and criminological analysis, Websdale describes the situational, cultural, and economic circumstances of Nashville's poor; examines the policing of social upheaval by detailing events in the 1997 looting and burning of the Dollar General Store; considers African American kinship systems and the special circumstances of battered women; and discusses why the vice trades-prostitution and selling drugs-thrive in public housing projects.

Websdale's hard-hitting look at community policing and its negative impact on the urban poor provides a much-needed balance to prevailing optimistic views on the effectiveness of this new method of law enforcement.