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ePub Defining the Peace: World War II Veterans, Race, and the Remaking of Southern Political Tradition download

by Jennifer E. Brooks

ePub Defining the Peace: World War II Veterans, Race, and the Remaking of Southern Political Tradition download
Author:
Jennifer E. Brooks
ISBN13:
978-0807855782
ISBN:
0807855782
Language:
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press (November 29, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1836 kb
Fb2 file:
1897 kb
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
582

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Kari Frederickson, author of The Dixiecrat Revolt and the End of the Solid South, 1932-1968. Brooks adds to a still emerging body of literature on the effects of local leaders to affect political, racial, and economic change after WWII.

Defining the Peace book. In Defining the Peace, Jennifer E. Brooks shows how veterans competed in a protracted and sometimes violent struggle to determine the c In the aftermath of World War II, Georgia's veterans-black, white, liberal, reactionary, pro-union, and anti-union-all found that service in the war enhanced their sense of male, political, and racial identity, but often. in contradictory ways.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: The University of North Carolina PressReleased: Jan 20, 2011ISBN: 9780807875759Format: book.

Brooks, Jennifer E. Defining the Peace: World War II Veterans, Race, and the Remaking of Southern Political Tradition (Univ of North Carolina Press, 2004). Bruscino Jr, Thomas A. "Minorities in the Military. in by James C. Bradford, ed. A Companion to American Military History (2010) vol 2 pp: 880-898.

World War II shook up the Republican field, possibly . Of the four strategies, Stark advocated for the so-called "Plan Dog," which contemplated a Europe first strategy and the avoidance of conflict with Japan for as long as possible.

World War II shook up the Republican field, possibly preventing the nomination of isolationist congressional leaders like Taft or Vandenberg. The 1940 Republican National Convention instead nominated Wendell Willkie, the first major party nominee since 1872 who had never held public office.

The best World War II books, as recommended by one of the most distinguished historians of the period . We always think about those who have died and the casualties of war without fully appreciating how the decisions of Stalin or Hitler changed everybody’s lives.

The best World War II books, as recommended by one of the most distinguished historians of the period, Sir Antony Beevor.

Defining the Peace: World War II Veterans, Race, and the Remaking of Southern Political Tradition.

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In the aftermath of World War II, Georgia's veterans--black, white, liberal, reactionary, pro-union, and anti-union--all found that service in the war enhanced their sense of male, political, and racial identity, but often in contradictory ways. In Defining the Peace, Jennifer E. Brooks shows how veterans competed in a protracted and sometimes violent struggle to determine the complex character of Georgia's postwar future. Brooks finds that veterans shaped the key events of the era, including the gubernatorial campaigns of both Eugene Talmadge and Herman Talmadge, the defeat of entrenched political machines in Augusta and Savannah, the terrorism perpetrated against black citizens, the CIO's drive to organize the textile South, and the controversies that dominated the 1947 Georgia General Assembly. Progressive black and white veterans forged new grassroots networks to mobilize voters against racial and economic conservatives who opposed their vision of a democratic South. Most white veterans, however, opted to support candidates who favored a conservative program of modernization that aimed to alter the state's economic landscape while sustaining its anti-union and racial traditions. As Brooks demonstrates, World War II veterans played a pivotal role in shaping the war's political impact on the South, generating a politics of race, anti-unionism, and modernization that stood as the war's most lasting political legacy.