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ePub Globetrotting: African American Athletes and Cold War Politics (Sport and Society) download

by Damion L. Thomas

ePub Globetrotting: African American Athletes and Cold War Politics (Sport and Society) download
Author:
Damion L. Thomas
ISBN13:
978-0252037177
ISBN:
0252037170
Language:
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press; 1st edition (September 24, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1903 kb
Fb2 file:
1535 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf rtf doc
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
102

Damion L. Thomas follows the State Department's efforts from 1945 to 1968 to showcase prosperous African American .

Damion L. Thomas follows the State Department's efforts from 1945 to 1968 to showcase prosperous African American athletes including Jackie Robinson. Thomas effectively highlights the essential role of propaganda in addressing Cold War diplomatic concerns, and he situates both race and black athletes at the heart of the United States government's effort to win the hearts and minds of formerly colonized peoples around the world. Journal of American Studies.

Cold War politics demanded proactive and reactive strategies to contest both physical places and intellectual spaces . Citation: Jeff Frederick.

Cold War politics demanded proactive and reactive strategies to contest both physical places and intellectual spaces lest they fall prey to Soviet influences. Freedom and liberty, equality and opportunity, were easily sold around the world as stock commodities of Americanism. Yet America’s racial realities were fertile ground for Soviet responses.

Throughout the Cold War, the Soviet Union deplored the treatment of African.

Series: Sport and Society. Published by: University of Illinois Press. Throughout the Cold War, the Soviet Union deplored the treatment of African Americans by the . government as proof of hypocrisy in the American promises of freedom and equality. African American athletes including Jackie Robinson, Jesse Owens, and the Harlem Globetrotters as the preeminent citizens of the African Diaspora rather than as victims of racial oppression. With athletes in baseball, track and field, and basketball, the government relied on figures whose fame carried the desired message to countries where English was little understood.

Throughout the Cold War, the Soviet Union deplored the treatment of African Americans by the . Damion L. Thomas follows the State Department's efforts from 1945 to 1968 to showcase prosperous African American athletes including Jackie Robinson, Jesse. Thomas follows the State Department's efforts from 1945 to 1968 to showcase prosperous African American athletes including Jackie Robinson, Jesse Owens, and the Harlem Globetrotters as the preeminent citizens of the African Diaspora rather than as victims of racial oppression.

What Damion L. Thomas does in Globetrotting is put the role of athletes from and center, providing welcome depth to this well-known story line. What Damion L. Thomas also demonstrates how these 'Cold Warriors' began to control the diplomatic missions, straying from the State Department's script to interpret their travels for themselves. -The Journal of American History.

Электронная книга "Globetrotting: African American Athletes and Cold War Politics", Damion L. Thomas

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Discussing the intersectionality between sports and race, Dr. Damion Thomas demonstrates that sports matter beyond the playing field. He is the author of Globetrotting: African American Athletes and Cold War Politics. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Thomas follows the State Department's efforts from 1945 to 1968 to showcase prosperous . University of Illinois Press. Thomas follows the State Department's efforts from 1945 to 1968 to showcase prosperous African American athletes including Jackie Robinson, Jesse Owens, and the Harlem Globetrotters as the preeminent citizens of the African Diaspora, rather than as victims of racial oppression.

Throughout the Cold War, the Soviet Union deplored the treatment of African Americans by the U.S. government as proof of hypocrisy in the American promises of freedom and equality. This probing history examines government attempts to manipulate international perceptions of U.S. race relations during the Cold War by sending African American athletes abroad on goodwill tours and in international competitions as cultural ambassadors and visible symbols of American values. Damion L. Thomas follows the State Department's efforts from 1945 to 1968 to showcase prosperous African American athletes including Jackie Robinson, Jesse Owens, and the Harlem Globetrotters as the preeminent citizens of the African Diaspora, rather than as victims of racial oppression. With athletes in baseball, track and field, and basketball, the government relied on figures whose fame carried the desired message to countries where English was little understood. However, eventually African American athletes began to provide counter-narratives to State Department claims of American exceptionalism, most notably with Tommie Smith and John Carlos's famous black power salute at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. Exploring the geopolitical significance of racial integration in sports during the early days of the Cold War, this book looks at the Eisenhower and Kennedy administrations' attempts to utilize sport to overcome hostile international responses to the violent repression of the civil rights movement in the United States. Highlighting how African American athletes responded to significant milestones in American racial justice such as the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision and the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Thomas surveys the shifting political landscape during this period as African American athletes increasingly resisted being used in State Department propaganda and began to use sports to challenge continued oppression.