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ePub Derailed: What Went Wrong and What to Do About America's Passenger Trains download

by Joseph Vranich

ePub Derailed: What Went Wrong and What to Do About America's Passenger Trains download
Author:
Joseph Vranich
ISBN13:
978-0312171827
ISBN:
031217182X
Language:
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press; 1 edition (October 15, 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1518 kb
Fb2 file:
1908 kb
Other formats:
lit mbr lrf lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
508

America needs train service. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

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America needs train service. Joseph Vranich, who worked to create Amtrak, now nearly three decades later declares it a "failed experiment. It suffers from crowded highways and airports, making travel nearly intolerable. Amtrak's future is bleak, and Congress is demanding that Amtrak be profitable by the turn of the century or shut down. Derailed shows the way to the kinds of passenger trains that will make sense in the twenty-first century. Anthony Haswell, founder of the National Association of Railroad Passengers. Is there a future for rail passenger service beyond Amtrak's interminable history of mediocrity and disappointment? Yes, Vranich reassures us, but only of- along with Amtrak- we dump our self-serving myths. Finally a book that is hard-hitting, courageous, and chock full of new ideas.

Amtrak’s Joseph Vranich has been involved with passenger promises . age of terrorism high-speed trains.

Amtrak’s Joseph Vranich has been involved with passenger promises about future progress are hollow. rail issues for more than thirty years. He is the author of two upgrades in its New York tunnels-an issueadditional books concerning passenger rail service: of added importance in an age of terrorism.

24, passengers on the stranded train donned ski jackets, gloves and toques in an effort to keep warm

24, passengers on the stranded train donned ski jackets, gloves and toques in an effort to keep warm. Critics of socialized train service long have complained of being stranded by Amtrak - stuck with the cost of maintaining passenger-train service that continues to eat up public monies at a rate that makes Amtrak's promise of financial independence by 2003 seem to be rank dishonesty.

Help us improve our Author Pages by updating your bibliography and submitting a new or current image and biography. Learn more at Author Central. Books by Joseph Vranich.

New York: St Martin's Press, 1997. Womack, James . Daniel T. Jones, and Daniel Roos. The Machine That Changed the World. New York: Rawson, 1990.

40 Center for Transportation Studies, Value Capture for Transportation Finance, Final Report, CTS-09- 185, University of Minnesota, June 2009. 41 The Consequences of Reduced Federal Transportation Investment (Washington, DC: Eno Center for Transportation and Bipartisan Policy Center, September 2012).

America needs train service. It suffers from crowded highways and airports, making travel nearly intolerable. Amtrak's future is bleak, and Congress is demanding that Amtrak be profitable by the turn of the century or shut down.

Joseph Vranich, who worked to create Amtrak, now nearly three decades later declares it a "failed experiment." Free of his ties to the rail industry today, he candidly reviews Amtrak's troubled history, its loss of market share, and its ability to provide better and faster service. Vranich reveals how Amtrak trains on most routes are not only slower than American trains were fifty years ago but are also slower than some trains found today in the Third World.

Vranich argues for passenger trains where and when they are needed. He praises innovative commuter rail agencies, high-speed train planners, and long-distance "land-cruise" trains run by independent organizations. He also offers insights from other countries, pointing the way to a successful rail system in the United States. This is a blueprint to defederalize and liquidate Amtrak-- a bold and convincing call to kill a wasteful government system. Vranich shows how to smartly dissolve Amtrak while keeping vital trains running in the twenty-first century.

  • Very Good reference.

  • I CAN GO ON FOR EVER ABOUT THIS SUBJECT BUT I CAN SAY THERE WERE SOME THINGS THAT WERE NOT TOUCHED ON VERY GOOD READING THANK YOU

  • I read this book not because I'm concerned about Amtrak but because I'm interested in railroads. Derailed turned into the best non-fiction I've read since leaving college a decade ago.
    The book takes a fresh approach to tired subjects. Wonder how many passenger trains operate independently of Amtrak in the United States? A photo layout helps illustrate that point. Curious about why Amtrak long-distance trains are in so much trouble? This book explains an ominous market shift where overnight passenger trains are in decline worldwide, even in Europe.
    Finally, I understand why Amtrak is in trouble over subsidies. Derailed explains how the "subsidy-per-passenger" is way out of line as compared with per-capita highway and aviation use. That's because Amtrak carries too few people despite Washington's generosity in giving it billions of dollars in subsidies.
    I've met people who will never ride Amtrak again. If my company treated our clients the way Amtrak has treated its passengers, we'd be out of business. Derailed touches upon that issue, also, giving readers refreshing food for thought. I don't know if Amtrak will survive or be liquidated, but it appears that the contents of this book will be part of the debate. If a book is a success or failure depending on whether it makes you think -- then Derailed is a huge success.

  • If anybody is skeptical about Mr. Vranich's message, one only has to consider what Amtrak's been up to since 'Derailed' was published. After paying a New York-based "design consultancy" big bucks, Amtrak has adopted a most insipid name for its new high speed trains. "Acela" is a meaningless string of letters concocted by an overpriced, mediocre consultant. Perhaps the experience of UAL Inc., United Airlines' holding company, in the late 1980s would be illustrative. UAL acquired Hertz Rent-A-Car and Western International hotels and attempted to reposition itself as a "total travel conglomerate". The name selected by UAL, "Allegis" was universally ridiculed and ultimately dropped. Donald Trump was widely quoted in the press as saying "Allegis" sounded like the next world class disease. "Acela" sounds like the HMO that handles cases of "Allegis". Other wags have commented that it's an acronym for "Amtrak Customers Experience Late Arrivals". Vranich was right.

  • In "Supertrains", Joseph Vranisch introduced the reader to the vital link in mass transportation taking shape in all corners of the world: high speed rail. In "Derailed", the author critically examines Amtrak, meticulously explaining how America's publicly financed passenger rail program has been an abject failure in carving out an important niche in the transportation arena as well as directly and indirectly sabotaging high speed rail programs along the way. Drawing on numerous statistics, Vranich illustrates how, with the exception of the Northeast corridor, Amtrak has done little more than provide Americans with a passenger rail service on a level only encountered in several developing nations. An early chapter also makes note that most of Amtrak's trains currently have longer schedules and endure more mechanical problems than the trains of the 1940's and 50's.
    Later chapters of the book outline the success enjoyed by other rail systems that are either a private enterprise or formed by public-private partnerships: commuter rail systems such as those in Chicago and New York, the freight companies such as Burlington Northern and Conrail and the tourist trains such as the Alaska Railroad, which, since its privatization has enjoyed its greatest financial success.
    The final chapters center on Vranich's arguments for the dissolution of Amtrak, a 10 step phase-out plan and his proposal for public-private partnerships in future passenger rail service as witnessed by the successful TGV in France. His convictions in this area are both passionate and highly cogent. One can only hope that the leaders of our nation will read this book and use it as a blueprint for reshaping America's transportation infrastructure.