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ePub Colorado's Volunteer Infantry in the Philippine Wars, 1898-1899 download

by Geoffrey R. Hunt

ePub Colorado's Volunteer Infantry in the Philippine Wars, 1898-1899 download
Author:
Geoffrey R. Hunt
ISBN13:
978-0826337009
ISBN:
0826337007
Language:
Publisher:
University of New Mexico Press (July 31, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1221 kb
Fb2 file:
1147 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf lit azw
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
435

The First Colorado Regiment enlisted in 1898 to fight Spaniards in Cuba, but ended up fighting in the Philippines. In his study, Geoffrey Hunt includes charts that document the reorganization of the Colorado National Guard during the late nineteenth century, the .

The First Colorado Regiment enlisted in 1898 to fight Spaniards in Cuba, but ended up fighting in the Philippines. Before they could join the campaign in Cuba, Commodore George Dewey's United States Navy squadron destroyed the Spanish fleet at Manila in May 1898. Army command structure in the Philippines, 1898-1899, and the volunteer regiments' members' deaths in the Philippines.

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in The Journal of Military History. The Journal of Military History, Volume 71, pp 240-240; doi:10.

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New Jersey, National Guard, Regiment, 4th-Registers, Spanish-American War, 1898-Regimental histories-New Jersey. Jersey City, N. J. : William F. Roeher.

Colorado's Volunteer Infantry in the Philippine Wars, 1898-1899 (1st Colorado on the Warren). University of New Mexico Press. Retrieved 2019-07-21. "American Shipping". July 16, 1920 – via Google Books. Government Printing Office. July 16, 1914 – via Google Books.

The First Colorado Infantry represents the expectations and experiences of citizen soldiers in America's quest for empire at the end of the nineteenth century.

The Philippine Insurrection began in February 1899, following the purchase . University Press of Colorado, 1993. No Glory for the Guards.

The Philippine Insurrection began in February 1899, following the purchase of the Philippines by the United States from Spain and the refusal of the United States to recognize a sovereign Philippine government. It ended in July 1902 when Presi-dent Theodore Roosevelt declared the Philippines pacied. At least 45 Virginians died in this conict. 45 10th C3 1993 Contains biographical sketches of several Virginia soldiers. Johnson, William Henry.

The First Colorado Regiment enlisted in 1898 to fight Spaniards in Cuba, but ended up fighting in the Philippines. Before they could join the campaign in Cuba, Commodore George Dewey's United States Navy squadron destroyed the Spanish fleet at Manila in May 1898. Dewey lacked the infantry necessary to seize the city itself, so the Colorado militia was rushed to the Philippines. The Colorado troops led the assault on Manila, seizing Fort San Antonio de Abad and raising the first American flag over the capitol city.

With the Spanish-American War over, the Filipinos expected independence. When it was clear independence would not be granted, tensions between the Filipinos and the Americans mounted until they escalated into battle in February 1899. The Coloradoans fought against the Filipinos in what came to be called the Philippine Insurrection. The war to free Cubans from Spanish rule had become a war to subject Filipinos to American rule.

The First Colorado Infantry represents the expectations and experiences of citizen soldiers in America's quest for empire at the end of the nineteenth century. In his study, Geoffrey Hunt includes charts that document the reorganization of the Colorado National Guard during the late nineteenth century, the U.S. Army command structure in the Philippines, 1898-1899, and the volunteer regiments' members' deaths in the Philippines.

  • Mr. Hunt's history of the First Colorado Regiment in the Spanish-American/Philippine American War is a solid, chronological survey. At last, there is a modern study of this distinguished regiment. I commend the author for his noble achievement!

    However, like all historical studies, there do exist certain lapses and inaccuracies. Not to sound picky, but some of the book's shortcomings ought to be addressed.

    For example, the history is very, very traditional. It does not contribute significantly -- in any new way -- to our understanding of the US war in the Philippines. The reader is treated to a time-worn, predictable narrative of young, enthusiastic volunteers going off to a distant, far-off land, fighting a conflict they did not fully comprehend -- and then returning home to tremendous accolade and celebration. In the field of military history, there are literally hundreds (if not thousands) of such examples.

    Secondly, in the many combat accounts given, additional maps would have proven most helpful. To discuss "Company B on the left" here and "firing on the right" there -- over and over again -- leaves the reader in a fog. I love reading good combat narrative, but detailed maps remain critical.

    Third, I was rather surprised by the lack of photographs. Pictographic archives from the Philippine-American War are quite plentiful, and should have been more employed.

    Fourth, the author relied FAR too heavily on the accounts given by one participant in particular, the soldier/reporter Arthur Johnson. Quite frankly, it may have been better to gently restructure the tome to be a study of Mr. Johnson's own experiences in the Philippines.

    Fifth, the story of the regiment is conducted within an "historical vacuum." For example, greater treatment of racial segregation/Jim Crow culture in Colorado should have been explored, especially given the racist attitudes of the soldiers towards the Filipinos. The attitudes of the Colorado soldiers could have been further explored/enhanced against the background of bloody race riots occurring throughout the US at this time...

    Sixth, it would have proven helpful to draw larger comparisons to the experiences of other state regiments serving in the Eighth Corps. In the last decade or so, there have been scholarly studies of the First North Dakota and the Utah Battery, for example, which may have provided the reader with additional insight. Was the experience of the First Colorado unique? If not, then how did it differ?

    Seventh, the work made extensive -- and consequently distracting -- use of lengthy, block quotations. This stylistic error, I suppose, is the mistake of the editors at the UNM Press.

    Eighth, this reader found three minor but curious factual issues. First, if one studies the photograph of soldiers lounging inside a tent (Page 57), one will note that the two figures in the background are women -- no doubt "ladies-of-the-evening." Second, Hunt mentions that the "10th Minnesota Regiment" (Page 43) served in the Philippines. Not true -- It was the 13th Minnesota; Third, Hunt mentions that the number of US Volunteer regiments ended with 37 (Page 203). Not so. The number eventually reached 46...

    Ninth, this reader wishes that Mr. Hunt had expanded his socio-economic examination of the backgrounds of the soldiers themselves. Personally, I found the class origins of the troops, their ages, pre-war occupations, et al to be very revealing. Afterall, who were these men....??

    Lastly, the study mentions that Colorado soldiers served elsewhere during the war, most famously with the Second Volunteer Cavalry Regiment ("Torrey's Rough Riders"). A footnote on these fellows would have been very informative. Along the same lines, what became of some of the officers after the war? (For example, ten years after the conflict, the commander of the regiment, Irving Hale, suffered a debilitating stroke....)

    I realize these criticisms are petty, and I certainly do not want to lessen the great efforts of Mr. Hunt. All-in-all, it is a great story of American GIs fighting in a long-forgotten conflict.

  • This is an exhaustively researched investigation into the the First Colorado Regiment. These troops enlisted in the army in the aftermath of the descruction of the battleship Main in 1998. They had just finished training and were assembled with other units in San Francisco when Admiral Dewey destroyed the Spanish fleet at Manila in May 1981. Having a shortage of infantry, these units were rushed to the Philippines rather than to Cuba.

    At the end of the eighteen hundreds the Americans were beginning to think of building an empire like those of the European powers. The First Colorado was put to fighting in the Philippines to take over the Spanish colony. They then found themselves as conquerors of the Philipine people and were fighting to subject them to American rule.

    The Spanish American war occurred at a time when the world was in a period of dramatic change. The American Army was still following the mentality of the Civil War, while the technology of quick firing artillery and machine guns were rapidly changing the battlefield. This new book covers a little reported, little understood part of American history.

  • While images of Roosevelt, Dewey and Maine are the most recognized images of the Spanish American War, Geoffrey Hunt provides some very interesting insight into lesser known actions of the war and the subsequent problems of dealing with an insurrection. Further, I found it interesting to see how much the members of the Colorado Volunteers were responsible for sowing the seeds of what would become the largest organization for Veterans, the VFW.