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ePub Seeing Red: Federal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 1919-1925 (Blacks in the Diaspo) download

by Theodore Kornweibel

ePub Seeing Red: Federal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 1919-1925 (Blacks in the Diaspo) download
Author:
Theodore Kornweibel
ISBN13:
978-0253333377
ISBN:
0253333377
Language:
Publisher:
Indiana University Press; First Edition edition (February 1, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1391 kb
Fb2 file:
1916 kb
Other formats:
txt lit azw rtf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
652

Now in Paper!Seeing RedFederal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 1919-1925.

Now in Paper!Seeing RedFederal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 1919-1925.

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African American Studies Books. Seeing Red : Federal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 1919-1925. Jr Theodore Kornweibel. What emerges is a fascinating tale of secret federal agents, many of them blacks, who were willing to take advantage of the color of their skin to spy upon others of their race.

Kornweibel, Theodore, Jr. & Seeing Red ^ Federal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 19191925. In an era in which justice was clearly not color blind, the federal government persistently harassed those viewed as radical blacks because they were involved in unpopular causes. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1998. The fact that most of the activity was legal was of little or no importance.

Theodore Kornweibel, Jr. "Seeing Red": Federal Campaigns Against . "Seeing Red": Federal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 1919-1925. The Archives has 955 reels of old Bureau of Investigation files alone. Kornweibel also has another book in the works on more or less the same subject. He knows as much or more than any other scholar about how the American intelligence community from the get go used what W. E. B. Du Bois called "the color line" to grow an empire long before the Cold War dawned.

Seeing Red: Federal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 1919-1925. Minkah Makalani, For the LIberation of Black People Everywhere: The African Blood Brotherhood, Black Radicalism, and Pan-African Liberation in the New Negro Movement, 1917-1936. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999. Ronald A. Kuykendall, "The African Blood Brotherhood, Independent Marxist During the Harlem Renaissance", The Western Journal of Black Studies, vol. 26, no. 1 (2002), pp. 16–21. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004.

What emerges is a fascinating tale of secret federal agents, many of them blacks, who were willing to take advantage of the color of their skin to spy upon others of their race.

Kornweibel J. Theodore, "Seeing Red": Federal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 1919-1925. McCormick, Charles . Seeing Reds: Federal Surveillance of Radicals in the Pittsburgh Mill District, 1917-1921. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1998. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1995. Murray, Robert . Red Scare: A Study in National Hysteria, 1919-1920. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1955. Oshinsky, David M. A Conspiracy So Immense: The World of Joe McCarthy.

Theodore Kornweibel,, American history professor. Directories Newly added. Fellow, Ford Foundation, 1970-1971; grantee, National Endowment of the Humanities, 1977, 1984, 1987, 1998-1999, American Philosophical Society, 1983-1984, Virginia History Society, 1998, Pennsylvania Museum & History Commission, 1998, Newberry Library. Pasadena, California, United States.

Kornweibel's book provides a sound specialized complement to existing broader surveys of WW I repression. while amounting to a prequel to his earlier Seeing Red: Federal Campaigns against Black Militancy, 1919–1925 (1998). Upper-division undergraduates and above.

Now in Paper!

""Seeing Red""Federal Campaigns Against Black Militancy, 1919-1925Theodore Kornweibel, Jr.

A gripping, painstakingly documented account of a neglected chapter in the history of American political intelligence.

""Kornweibel is an adept storyteller who admits he is drawn to the role of the historian-as-detective....What emerges is a fascinating tale of secret federal agents, many of them blacks, who were willing to take advantage of the color of their skin to spy upon others of their race. And it is a tale of sometimes desperate and frequently angry government officials, including J. Edgar Hoover, who were willing to go to great lengths to try to stop what they perceived as threats to continued white supremacy."" -- Patrick S. Washburn, Journalism History

Theodore Kornweibel, Jr., Professor of African American history in the Africana Studies Department at San Diego State University, is author of No Crystal Stair and In Search of the Promised Land.

Blacks in the Diaspora -- Darlene Clark Hine, John McCluskey, Jr., and David Barry Gaspar, general editors

  • The FBI and the other "security" and "intelligence" agencies of the US government came into their modern identities in the vicious campaigns against dissent in this country during World War I and in the years after it when the heat of the Russian Revolution and the upserge of revolution that followed it swept over the United States. The government carried out a ruthless campaign of deportations, banning newspapers, imprisoning IWW and socialist leaders like Eugene V. Debs and violent crushing of strikes by the national guard, armies of cops, and the US Military. This was the period with US Army "air pioneer" Billy Mitchell offered to bomb West Virginia strikers, but was told the mine bosses would use their own planes!

    This book indicates that the African American movement for civil rights and equality as well as early Black nationalist, socialist, and other radicals were the target of spying, harassment, and persecution during these days. Not only did government agents penetrate African American organizations and attempt to provoke them against each other, but the Post office and the FBI attempted to obstruct the circulation of main line Black newspapers like the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender. This book also show how Washington worked directly with the British government to harass, spy on, and hinder organizations that advocated independence and self-government for British and other European colonies in Africa and the West Indies.

    The FBI, born in this period, was born to fight Black rights!

  • This is an admirably well-reasoned account, based on archived FBI documentation. Kornweibel's narrative totally lacks hysteria and sweeping overstatements. A must read, essential for understanding COINTELPRO.

  • Theodore Kornweibel did a tremendous amount of research to reveal the degree to which the U.S. Government spied on and subverted any civil rights group that advocated for the civil rights of people of African descent.