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by Samuel Farber

ePub The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered (Envisioning Cuba) download
Author:
Samuel Farber
ISBN13:
978-0807856734
ISBN:
0807856738
Language:
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (March 13, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1847 kb
Fb2 file:
1195 kb
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Rating:
4.5
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943

Analyzing the crucial period of the Cuban Revolution from 1959 to 1961, Samuel Farber challenges dominant scholarly and popular views of the revolution's sources. Find all the books, read about the author, and more.

Analyzing the crucial period of the Cuban Revolution from 1959 to 1961, Samuel Farber challenges dominant scholarly and popular views of the revolution's sources. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Samuel Farber (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0807856734.

The Origins of the Cuba Revolution Reconsidered Essay. This book looks into the decisive period of Cuban history . The author Samuel Farber uses a very different view of the entire process of revolution. Paper type: Essay Pages: 6 (1429 words). This book analyses the moments of Cuban Revolution and the author Samuel Farber defy the basic prevailing intellectual and accepted outlooks relating to the Cuban Revolution along with its historical trajectory, shape and source.

Similar books to The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered .

Similar books to The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered (Envisioning Cuba). Kindle (5th Generation). One of the most useful works on the Cuban Revolution has appeared with Samuel Farber's "The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered". In writing Origins, Samuel Farber has not only set the record straight, but also he has made a contribution to 'those trying to create a new revolutionary and democratic Left in Cuba. One of the most useful works on the Cuban Revolution.

Analyzing the crucial period of the Cuban Revolution from 1959 to 1961, Samuel Farber challenges . Exploring how historical conflicts between .

Analyzing the crucial period of the Cuban Revolution from 1959 to 1961, Samuel Farber challenges dominant scholarly and popular views of the revolution's sources, shape, and historical trajectory. and Cuban interests colored the reactions of both nations' leaders after the overthrow of Fulgencio Batista, Farber argues that the structure of Cuba's economy and politics in the first half of the twentieth century made the island ripe for radical social and economic change, and the ascendant Soviet Union was on hand to provide early.

The Origins of the Cuban Revolution. The University of North Carolina Press. The paper in this book meets the guidelines for permanence and durability of the Committee on Production Guidelines for Book Longevity of the Council on Library Resources. Farber, Samuel, 1939–. The origins of the Cuban Revolution reconsidered, by Samuel Farber. p. c. (Envisioning Cuba). Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN-13: 978-0-8078-3001-7 (cloth : alk. paper).

Samuel Farber is professor of political science at Brooklyn College and author of three previous books, including Revolution and Reaction . Draws on the vast scholarship that has addressed the origins of the Cuban revolution.

Samuel Farber is professor of political science at Brooklyn College and author of three previous books, including Revolution and Reaction in Cuba, 1933-1960: A Political Sociology from Machado to Castro. For more information about Samuel Farber, visit the Author Page. interesting and polemical book.

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Start by marking The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered as Want to Read . Analyzing the crucial period of the Cuban Revolution from 1959 to 1961, Samuel Farber challenges dominant scholarly and popular views of the revolution's sources, shape, and historical trajectory. Unlike many observers, who treat Cuba's revolutionary leaders as having merely reacted to . policies or domestic socioeconomic conditions, Farber shows that revolutionary Analyzing the crucial period of the Cuban Revolution from 1959 to 1961, Samuel Farber challenges dominant scholarly and popular views of the revolution's sources, shape, and historical trajectory. series Envisioning Cuba. Books related to The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered.

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Samuel Farber (born in Marianao, Havana, Cuba) is an American writer born and raised in Cuba. Born and raised in Mariano, Cuba, Farber came to the United States in February 1958. in Sociology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1969 and taught at a number of colleges and universities including UCLA and, most recently, Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, where he is a Professor Emeritus of Political. Before Stalinism: Rise and Fall of Soviet Democracy, Verso Books, October 1990

Analyzing the crucial period of the Cuban Revolution from 1959 to 1961, Samuel Farber challenges dominant scholarly and popular views of the revolution's sources, shape, and historical trajectory. Unlike many observers, who treat Cuba's revolutionary leaders as having merely reacted to U.S. policies or domestic socioeconomic conditions, Farber shows that revolutionary leaders, while acting under serious constraints, were nevertheless autonomous agents pursuing their own independent ideological visions, although not necessarily according to a master plan.Exploring how historical conflicts between U.S. and Cuban interests colored the reactions of both nations' leaders after the overthrow of Fulgencio Batista, Farber argues that the structure of Cuba's economy and politics in the first half of the twentieth century made the island ripe for radical social and economic change, and the ascendant Soviet Union was on hand to provide early assistance. Taking advantage of recently declassified U.S. and Soviet documents as well as biographical and narrative literature from Cuba, Farber focuses on three key years to explain how the Cuban rebellion rapidly evolved from a multiclass, antidictatorial movement into a full-fledged social revolution.
  • This writer gives an objective summary of the Cuban revolution, with precipitating events going back to the 1930's and further. It was very informative, with a minimum of spin and an obvious grounding in research. The author lets you make up your own mind, which I appreciated.

    The thing the book doesn't do much is bring Cuban history to life. I'm sure there are many stories about Castro and others that could add color to the story. Only a few of these are included.

  • Certain realities are glossed over or sidestepped in Samuel Farber's recapitulation of the Cuban Revolution. A note to readers: this is a theoretical and policy-oriented narrative, not a review of the people or events of the Revolution as such.

    Farber is a Cuban-born democratic socialist, the son of Jewish immigrants and a participant in the 1950s revolutionary movement. As such he is well-poised to both understand his subject and communicate its nuances to outsiders. As a democratic leftist he is torn, however, between condemning Castro's personal rule, and the Soviet-imitation bureaucratic repression of Cuban daily life; and the need and desirability of a social revolution to transform the island's backwardness, and defy US hegemony. There is no reason - in theory - why one is needed with the other. Yet. . . .

    Farber does a great job in exploring the US' intrinsic hostility to social democracy and social revolution on principle. Thus it becomes irrelevant if Castro was a Communist in 1959 or not; and equally beside the point that the US could have been more understanding and tolerant. Castro was a revolutionary; the Cuban elite and the US demanded business as usual; and both sides believed in their own absolute moral virtue. Thus, as Farber explains well, there was little possibility of compromise on essentials.

    Farber also explores the sui generis populist radicalism of the early Revolution, how its transformation into official socialism was not planned but an outgrowth of action and reactions in a cold war context. There is a world of revolutionary thought and practice between Washington and Moscow, and the Cuban Revolution was in its first days sincere in exploring these. Farber concludes with a belief that opening Cuba will give the democratic left the space necessary to resume its aborted vision in the interests of the Cuban people. Yet. . . .

    The issues Farber leaves dangling tend to undermine his own case. Just how would the Revolution meet its security and economic needs against determined US opposition? In this sense, it really doesn't matter how democratic Fidel was, as his alleged Communism was also irrelevant. It was the process of change that produced the reaction, as witness Arbenz in Guatemala or Allende in Chile. Fidel congratulated himself on his survival precisely because he didn't trifle with democratic and legal nicities. How could the Revolution have survived without cold war realignment, just 90 miles from US waters, with a government that had no more use for non-alignment in its sphere than the USSR? Hungary's revolution could not have survived in '56 as a neutral state; neither could Cuba's, ten years later.

    That the democratic left will have the wherewithal to oppose either the current Party elite, as they transform themselves into "state businessmen"; or the well-funded, US-supported contras seething for vengeful return in Miami, is also doubtful. The largest mass social movement is likely, instead, to be out of Cuba toward the United States, undercutting the popular base Farber hopes to mobilize for a post-Castro social democracy.