mostraligabue
» » Fire on the Beach: Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers

ePub Fire on the Beach: Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers download

by David Wright

ePub Fire on the Beach: Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers download
Author:
David Wright
ISBN13:
978-0195154849
ISBN:
0195154843
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (August 22, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1967 kb
Fb2 file:
1233 kb
Other formats:
lit mbr mobi txt
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
982

The book Fire On The Beach by authors David Wright and David Zoby is a very important history lesson not just for those of us. .FIRE ON THE BEACH provides a glimpse into the culture and the struggle of these brave men. Their gallant actions, in the rescue of the victims of the .

The book Fire On The Beach by authors David Wright and David Zoby is a very important history lesson not just for those of us living in North Carolina but also for people living all over the world. Richard Etheridge began life as a slave in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, he was property of the Etheridge family and was considered a part of the family. At the age of 21 Richard, without asking the permission of his owners, joined the army and became a Union soldier. Newman, are described in amazing detail.

Fire on the Beach" recovers a lost gem of American history. This book describes the Pea Island station that was staffed by an all black crew. Their bravery and success in saving lives in the face of the horrific racism they lived through is a testament to their strength. It tells the story of the . Life-Saving Service, formed in 1871 to assure the safe passage of FROM THE CIVIL WAR TO THE TURN OF THE CENTURY, THIS IS THE TRUE-LIFE STORY OF THE ORIGINAL COAST GUARD AND ONE CREW OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN HEROES WHO FOUGHT STORMS AND SAVED LIVES OFF NORTH CAROLINA'S OUTER BANKS.

Book Overview Although it was decommissioned in 1915, a century ago the LSS boasted some two hundred stations, and th.

Fire on the Beach recovers the heroic, long-forgotten story of the only all-black crew in the history of the . In 1871 the Life-Saving Service, the precursor to the Coast Guard, was created by Congress to assure the safe passage of American and international shipping and to save lives and salvage cargo.

Fire on the Beach recovers a lost gem of American history. Life-Saving Service, formed in 1871 to assure the safe passage of American and international shipping and to save lives and salvage cargo. A century ago, the adventures of the now-forgotten surfmen who, in crews of seven, bore the brunt of this dangerous but vital duty filled the pages of popular reading material, from Harper’s to the Baltimore Sun and New York Herald

Fire on the Beach recovers a lost gem of American history. A century ago, the adventures of the now-forgotten "surfmen" who, in crews of seven, bore the brunt of this dangerous but vital duty filled the pages of popular reading material, from Harper's to the Baltimore Sun and New York Herald

Wright, David; Zoby, David. Etheridge, Richard, 1842-1900, United States. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Wright, David; Zoby, David. Life-Saving Service, African American lifeboat crew members, Lifesaving stations. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on September 14, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014). A century ago, the adventures of the now-forgotten "surfmen" who, in crews of seven, bore the brunt of this dangerous but vital duty filled the pages of popular reading material, from Harper's to the Baltimore Sun and New York Herald

From the Civil War to the turn of the century, this is the true-life story of the original Coast Guard and one crew of African-American heroes who fought storms and saved lives off America's southeastern coast. 3 people like this topic.

From the Civil War to the turn of the century, this is the true-life story of the original Coast Guard and one crew of African-American heroes who fought storms and saved lives off America's southeastern coast.

Fire on the Beach: Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers (Charles Scribner's Sons . 1994: Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Award, the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Foundation, Fairfax, V.

Fire on the Beach: Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers (Charles Scribner's SonsScribner, 2001; Oxford University Press paper, 2002). Rescue Men: The Story of the Pea Island Lifesavers (2010).1993: Paul Cuffe Memorial Fellowship, Munson Institute of American Maritime Studies, Mystic, C. Although civilian attitudes toward Etheridge and his men ranged from curiosity to outrage, they figured among the mos. more)

Fire on the Beach" recovers a lost gem of American history. Station 17, located on the desolate beaches of Pea Island, North Carolina, housed one such unit, and Richard Etheridge - the only black man to lead a lifesaving crew - was its captain. more).

Fire on the Beach recovers the heroic, long-forgotten story of the only all-black crew in the history of the U.S. Coast Guard. In 1871 the Life-Saving Service, the precursor to the Coast Guard, was created by Congress to assure the safe passage of American and international shipping and to save lives and salvage cargo. Although it was decommissioned in 1915, a century ago the LSS boasted some two hundred stations, and the adventures of the now forgotten "surfmen" filled the pages of popular reading, from Harper's to the Baltimore Sun to the New York Herald.This book tells the story of Station 17 of Pea Island, North Carolina, and its courageous captain, Richard Etheridge. A former slave and Civil War veteran, Etheridge was appointed Keeper of the Pea Island station, but when the white crew already in place refused to serve under him, he recruited and trained an entirely black crew. Although they were among the most courageous in the service, leading many daring rescues and saving scores of men, women, and children along the treacherous stretch of coast known as "the Graveyard of the Atlantic," civilian attitudes toward the Pea Island surfmen ranged from curiosity to outrage. When a hurricane hit the Banks in the late 1890s, they managed to save everyone aboard the wrecked E.S. Newman. This incredible feat went unrecognized for a century until, in 1996, the Coast Guard posthumously awarded Etheridge and his men the Gold Life-Saving Medal.This courageous story of a group of men who battled prejudice as well as fierce storms to carry out heroic deeds illustrates yet another example of the contribution of one group of remarkable African Americans to this country's history.
  • very informative

  • This is a great history about the lifesaver. I didn't know they existed. This is rich history in the making!

  • Excellent book and historical account of the Pea Island Life Savers

  • I have been a resident of North Carolina for over 12 years and had never heard of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Life Savers. The book Fire On The Beach by authors David Wright and David Zoby is a very important history lesson not just for those of us living in North Carolina but also for people living all over the world.
    Richard Etheridge began life as a slave in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, he was property of the Etheridge family and was considered a part of the family. At the age of 21 Richard, without asking the permission of his owners, joined the army and became a Union soldier. Richard was proud to be fighting to try to end slavery. He was prepared to fight to the death to make life better for himself and those around him. While in the Army, Etheridge and other Black soldiers were known as the "African Brigade." These men fought valiently and after the war they all went back home to some of the same problems and issues they had before the war.
    The Outer Banks of North Carolina had always been a problem for ships;they often ran aground on the North Carolina shores. As a result, in 1874, life saving stations were opened all over the Outer Banks. Initially most of the crews were checkered or made up of Black and White men. The Lifesavers of the Outer Banks had a troubled history of haphazardly run patrols, poorly trained lifesavers, and stations that were run erracticly. Many lifesavers got positions because of who they knew and were related to. The Lifesavers of the Outer Banks were in desparate need of an image change.
    In February 1880, that image changed radically, Richard Etheridge was named keeper of Pea Island Station 17, and what made it even more special is that he had an all Black crew. A Keeper is a man who could keep stroke with an oar, knew the local currents and had a disposition that allowed for high risks at low pay. This appointment was historic and even as racially divided as the United States was at that time, everyone agreed that Richard Etheridge was more than qualified for the position.
    Being a member of the Life Saving Service was not an easy task, add to that being Black and that makes for a lot of drama. This book is very informative and important for people of all races and all over the world. The dates,the facts,and the many stories told are put together well. On the RAW scale it is a 4.
    Reviewed by Simone A. Hawks

  • Faced with several days of enforced inactivity as Hurricane Isabel bore down upon Baltimore, what I needed was a good book with which to pass the hours. There on my shelf was Fire on the Beach, purchased several months ago but set aside for just such a circumstance. As the wind howled around my apartment and rain slashed at my windows, I settled in to read.
    Authors Wright and Zoby have written a thrilling account about the American Life Saving Service (ALSS), predecessor to the U.S. Coast Guard. Their focus is on the life of Richard Etheridge, born into slavery, a soldier in the Union Army during the Civil War, and later, leader of a courageous crew of lifesavers at Pea Island's Station 17 on the Outer Banks.
    Richard Etheridge, probably the son of a white "Banker," raised and educated as part of his family, obtained his freedom fighting with the North Carolina Colored Volunteers (NCCV), under infamous Colonel Edward A. Wild. After the war, the scandel-ridden ALSS was reorganized and Etheridge was appointed Keeper of the station at Pea Island; the only black man to command a station up to that point. Etheridge was, indeed, a "man among men," risking his life time and again, driving his 6-member crew of surfmen to rescue sailors and passengers off unfortunate ships driven ashore by storms at least as furious as the one threatening Maryland on this day.
    Here is a tale of daring exploits during an obscure time in American history; of courageous men of color fighting steep breakers and raging surf over shallow shoals while saving stranded survivors of doomed vessels before the deadly sea could claim them.
    A fascinating account. Some might say it's black history. But it's more than that. It's about raw courage; about bravery against a treacherous enemy - the sea at its worst. Etheridge and his crew were black, but first and foremost, they were real men who willingly risked their lives daily for others.
    I heartily recommend this work as an eye-opening account of a time along the Outer Banks before storms were tracked with high-tech equipment, and as a gripping tale guaranteed to hold your interest.

  • Besides the fact that David Zoby is the youngest brother of a childhood friend of mine, this book is absolutely gripping. Anyone who loves the Outer Banks of North Carolina should read this. The sheer courage and fortitude of these men is amazing. This is history that is not taught in school, but should be. The Davids' descriptions of the lifesaving crews' patrols put you in their shoes. I highly recommend this book.

  • Wright and Zoby do a great job of explaining the history, culture, and lifestyle of the Pea Island Life Saving Station surfmen. If you have been to Pea Island, Hatteras Island, or the lower Outer Banks of North Carolina you may notice there are very few African Americans. The acceptance that might be there today was obviously not as prevalent in the 1890's.

    FIRE ON THE BEACH provides a glimpse into the culture and the struggle of these brave men. Their gallant actions, in the rescue of the victims of the U.S.S. Huron and E.S. Newman, are described in amazing detail. If you travel to the Outer Banks, be sure to visit the Chicamacomico Lifesaving Station and museum (in Rodanthe on Hatteras Island). It will help readers understand the lifesaving station, the rescue methods employed, and the sacrifices made by the United States Life-saving Service surfmen all along the eastern shore.

  • A well written book highlighting the legacy of the under appreciated Pea Island Lifesaving Station and its African American crew. Any Banker worth his salt needs to know this story. These men were heroes and deserve to have their story told.