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ePub Persona Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment with the Cuban Revolution (Nation Books) download

by Jorge Edwards,Octavio Paz

ePub Persona Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment with the Cuban Revolution (Nation Books) download
Author:
Jorge Edwards,Octavio Paz
ISBN13:
978-1560256076
ISBN:
1560256079
Language:
Publisher:
Nation Books (March 31, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1939 kb
Fb2 file:
1713 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
246

Jorge Edwards sure did; 'I was very much affected by the feeling of being watched by the police at all times . This book, written in 1972, is one of the few reliable historical records regarding Allende's relationship with Fidel Castro.

Jorge Edwards sure did; 'I was very much affected by the feeling of being watched by the police at all times, and this had gone so far as to cause me persistent insomnia and physical difficulty in breathing, together with pains in the chest and the sensation of being on the point of having a heart attack. And Edwards, as Salvador Allende's Charge D'Affairs, had diplomatic immunity! This book, written in 1972, is one of the few reliable historical records regarding Allende's relationship with Fidel Castro.

Xvi, 294 pages ; 24 cm. In 1970 Jorge Edwards was sent by Chilean President Allende as his country's first envoy to break the diplomatic blockade that had sealed off Cuba for over a decade. His arrival coincided with the turning point of the Revolution, when Castro began to repress the very intellectuals he had once courted. A gifted writer, a diplomat, a socialist, an outsider, Edwards has a unique perspective on this crucial moment in history, which has determined Cuba's fate.

Persona Non Grata book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Persona Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment with the Cuban Revolution as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

A Memoir of Disenchantment with the Cuban Revolution (Nation Books). Published March 31, 2004 by Nation Books. Someone had already hinted to me in Santiago that I might be getting a new posting, so the telephone call I received in Lima did not take me entirely by surprise.

Persona Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment With the Cuban Revolution, by Jorge Edwards, preface by Octavio Paz (1993)

Persona Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment With the Cuban Revolution, by Jorge Edwards, preface by Octavio Paz (1993). Edwards, a renowned novelist, was Chilean President Salvador Allende's man in Havana in the winter of 1970-1971, there to open an embassy and establish a diplomatic presence for the fledgling socialist government in Santiago. However, his friendship with the dissident Cuban poet Heberto Padilla provoked Castro to accuse him of "conduct hostile to the revolution" and to banish him from the island. His indispensable memoir first appeared in English in 1977

Предметы: PERSONA Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment With the Cuban Revolution (Book), EDWARDS, Jorge, CUBA - Politics & government - 1959-1990, NONFICTION.

Предметы: PERSONA Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment With the Cuban Revolution (Book), EDWARDS, Jorge, CUBA - Politics & government - 1959-1990, NONFICTION. Географические термины: CUBA. Читать онлайн PDF-полный текст.

Persona Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment with the Cuban Revolution. Jorge Edwards Paragon House. Described by Octavio Paz: . he history of the disenchantment of a generation of intellectuals; thanks to this book, many men and women were able to see the true nature of the Cuban regime. Pitching Around Fidel: A Journey into the Heart of Cuban Sports. Why shouldn't the . steal Cuba's best athletes? Real Life in Castro's Cuba. Catherine Moses SR Books. Subject To Solution: Problems in Cuban-US Relations

Persona Non Grata ) . Edwards recorded his disenchantment with the revolution in this book that made him a victim of double censorship and was banned by the left as well as the right.

Persona Non Grata ) In 1970 Edwards was sent by socialist Chilean President Allende as his country's first envoy to break the diplomatic blockade that had sealed Cuba for over a decade, and open a Chilean embassy. Since its publication over thirty years ago, it has maintained its authenticity and is considered the most controversial and notorious work of the winner of the Premio Cervantes 1999.

May be you will be interested in other books by Jorge Edwards: Persona Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment with .

May be you will be interested in other books by Jorge Edwards: Persona Non Grata: A Memoir of Disenchantment with the Cuban Revolution (Nation Books) by Jorge Edwards. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Jorge Edwards. In 1970 Jorge Edwards was sent by socialist Chilean President Salvador Allende as his country’s first envoy to break the diplomatic blockade that had sealed Cuba for over a decade. His arrival coincided with the turning point of the revolution, when Castro began to repress the very intellectuals he once courted.

Persona Non Grata : A Memoir of Disenchantment with the Cuban Revolution.

In 1970 Jorge Edwards was sent by socialist Chilean President Salvador Allende as his country’s first envoy to break the diplomatic blockade that had sealed Cuba for over a decade. His arrival coincided with the turning point of the revolution, when Castro began to repress the very intellectuals he once courted. In Kafkaesque detail, Edwards records the four explosive months he spent in Havana trying to open a Chilean embassy and his disenchantment with the revolution. His stay culminated in the arrest of his friend Heberto Padilla—the first imprisonment of a well-known writer by the regime—for giving Edwards a “negative view of the revolution.” In a menacing midnight political debate with Edwards immediately after Padilla’s arrest, Castro argued that in this phase of the revolution, bourgeois writers would no longer have “anything to do in Cuba.” Castro accused Edwards of “conduct hostile to the revolution” and declared him “persona non grata.” The winner of the Cervantes prize—the Spanish language equivalent to the Nobel Prize for literature—Jorge Edwards' memoir splendidly recounts this time and the wrath of Castro.
  • In spite of the fact that it was written in 1971, Cuba is still the same. The part about the visit of the Chilean Naval Training ship Esmeralda is specially "entertaining"!

  • When I finished this book I couldn't tell if the author was naive in his relation with the Cuban Government and Fidel Castro, or he wanted to play dumb.
    Seeing the disaster of communism in Cuba, was not enough for him to take a honest position against the Government of Allende who was trying to do the same in Chile. The author assumed the leftist position of some European writers that fought against the reality of their broken socialist dream. The same writers that looked in the other way, avoiding to see that the regular Cuban citizen did not have access to their books, because European leftist books were prohibited in Cuba by the authorities. I will never know if this author was really naive in his contact and relation with Fidel Castro, o his conscience did not let him to sleep at night, after he left Cuba. One way or another, he was another coward that accepted to close his mouth instead of exposing the ugly true of the Cuban Revolution and his macabre architect: Fidel Castro. " Not speaking against a crime, is the same than committing the crime. Jose Marti"
    Some people have to live with their positions in life.

  • It was a good history of how the Cuban Revolution was highjacked by a dictator. How a people was subjugated by the whim and caprices of one man.

  • Today, I read in the international newspapers that supposed 'whistleblower' Edward Snowden wants to get into Cuba to evade calls from the U.S. government for his extradition (though he wasn't in the seat on the Aeroflot plane he supposedly had booked for him). If Snowden wants to learn about surveillance, there's no better place than the Castro brothers' Cuba.

    Jorge Edwards sure did; 'I was very much affected by the feeling of being watched by the police at all times, and this had gone so far as to cause me persistent insomnia and physical difficulty in breathing, together with pains in the chest and the sensation of being on the point of having a heart attack.'

    And Edwards, as Salvador Allende's Charge D'Affairs, had diplomatic immunity!

    This book, written in 1972, is one of the few reliable historical records regarding Allende's relationship with Fidel Castro. With the benefit of hindsight the reader will see just why the Chilean military--at the request of the Chilean legislature and support of the Chilean Supreme Court--finally acted to overthrow Allende in 1973. It was either that or Chile would descend into the totalitarian nightmare that Edwards experienced in Cuba while trying to re-open the Chilean embassy in 1971.

    At his 'exit interview' with Castro he's told in no uncertain terms that Allende will have to fight to establish his power in Chile; 'Up to now Allende has only taken control of the Government, but that only means approaching the outer ramparts of power. When it come to seizing power, then the confrontation will be inevitable....'

    And, to that end, Castro was then sending arms and military personnel clandestinely to Chile. Edwards saw evidence of it. He recognized the self-destructive path Allende had set for himself. I stress again, this was written BEFORE the 1973 Pinochet coup. The book is very valuable for true students of history, but Castro and Allende idolators will hate it.

  • This is a fascinating book.

    First, it's a long, honest (brutally honest) look at the Cuban state by a "bourgeois liberal intellectual" (I'm using "liberal" in the English sense - with connotations of free speech, free trade, and social justice - perhaps "reform liberalism" is a better term in the USA?); a point of view pretty close to my own (and, I would guess, many westerners these days who consider themselves synpathetic to "the left"). So the author is sympathetic to the revolutionary ideals, but can also see, quite clearly, what Castro cannot.

    Second, it explores the tension that arises when an attempt to achieve those ideals is opposed - the spiral of control and resistance, secret police and "traitors". It's pretty common to forgive Cuba because "they've had to withstand so much" (particularly the American embargo); this book makes a good case that by the early 1970s Castro had already overdrawn this moral account.

    Third, it indirectly sheds light on Chile's own democratic revolution, under Allende. To what extent Allende failed through being too open, and whether any other approach would have been worthwhile, is a constant subtext.

    Finally, it was interesting to see how diplomacy "works" at a basic day-to-day level.

    [I should add I read the Chilean/Spanish 2006 edition - it has a few extra details (mainly footnotes) added, apparently, but nothing very significant.]

  • Although a denunciation of Castro's dictatorship in Cuba, during the author's 4 months as a Chilean diplomat in havana in 1970, he reveals the haughtiness and lack of compassion towards people not as 'intellectual' as him.

    The book must me considered a well-intentioned exercise of narcissism. Verbosity, conceit, and arrogant outpouring of self-adulatory writing. I couldn't stand it and put the book away almost half-way through. If only the reader didn't have to fish the interesting bits of information from this sea of conceit...

    The obscene thing about it is the nonchalant tone, the care-free attitude of intellectual superiority with which he carries on in the island while thousands of poor Cubans he ignores were starving, sentenced to hard-labor, executed by firing-squads or tortured in nazi-like concentration camps. All this while he was being regaled lavishly by the the nomenklatura.

    Thanks for your help, anyway, mister Edwards. I couldn't finish your book but I guess it moved a few strings up there, in the abode where the elistist class of self-called intellectuals and diplomats hang around.

    I, nevertheless, will hang out with real men like Valladares ('Against All Hope') and Jorge Masetti ('In the Pirate's Den').