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ePub Corruption in Cuba: Castro and Beyond download

by Sergio Díaz-Briquets,Jorge Pérez-López

ePub Corruption in Cuba: Castro and Beyond download
Author:
Sergio Díaz-Briquets,Jorge Pérez-López
ISBN13:
978-0292714823
ISBN:
0292714823
Language:
Publisher:
University of Texas Press; First Edition (US) First Printing edition (October 1, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1849 kb
Fb2 file:
1658 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
130

Even though combating corruption cannot be the central aim of post-Castro policy, Sergio Díaz-Briquets and Jorge Pérez-López .

In short, unless measures are taken to stem corruption, the new Cuba could be as messy as the old Cuba. Jorge Pérez-López is Director of Monitoring at the Fair Labor Association, a collaborative effort among companies, civil society organizations, and universities to improve working conditions in factories around the world.

The book Corruption in Cuba states that public ownership resulted in "a lack of identifiable ownership . Corruption in Cuba : Castro and beyond. Pérez-López, Jorge F. (1st e. Austin: University of Texas Press.

The book Corruption in Cuba states that public ownership resulted in "a lack of identifiable ownership and widespread misuse and theft of state resources. when given opportunity, few citizens hesitate to steal from the government. Furthermore, the complex relationship between governmental and economic institutions makes them especially "prone to corruption. The question of what causes corruption in Cuba presently and historically continues to be discussed and debated by scholars.

In short, unless measures are taken to stem corruption, the new Cuba could be as messy as the old Cuba

Home Browse Books Book details, Corruption in Cuba: Castro and Beyond.

Home Browse Books Book details, Corruption in Cuba: Castro and Beyond. Corruption in Cuba: Castro and Beyond. By Sergio Díaz-Briquets, Jorge Pérez-López. In short, unless measures are taken to stem corruption, the new Cuba could be as messy as the old Cuba. Fidel Castro did not bring corruption to Cuba; he merely institutionalized it.

After the end of the second US military intervention in 1909, the Cuban government made efforts to exhibit an image of republican rebirth and, as a result, the first university statutes, which were drafted without the supervision of either colonial or interventionist governments, were put into effect in the 1910-1911 academic course.

While Fidel Castro maintains his longtime grip on Cuba, revolutionary scholars and policy analysts have turned their attention from how Castro succeeded (and failed), to how Castro himself will be succeeded-by a new government. Among the many questions to be answered is how the new government will deal with the corruption that has become endemic in Cuba.

Diaz-Briquets, Sergio. Corruption and transitions The nature of corruption and its consequences Roots of corruption in Cuba Determinants of corruption in socialist Cuba Corruption in socialist Cuba The early transition and corruption Averting corruption in the long term. Personal Name: Pérez-López, Jorge F. Rubrics: Political corruption Cuba Corruption.

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Journals /. The Historian /.

Next came four decades of routine expropriation of the personal property of all permanent emigrants

Added to this is the widespread petty (administrative) corruption that pervades Cuban society, mostly because of the nature of the economic system and the scarcity of goods and services it has created.

While Fidel Castro maintains his longtime grip on Cuba, revolutionary scholars and policy analysts have turned their attention from how Castro succeeded (and failed), to how Castro himself will be succeeded—by a new government. Among the many questions to be answered is how the new government will deal with the corruption that has become endemic in Cuba. Even though combating corruption cannot be the central aim of post-Castro policy, Sergio Díaz-Briquets and Jorge Pérez-López suggest that, without a strong plan to thwart it, corruption will undermine the new economy, erode support for the new government, and encourage organized crime. In short, unless measures are taken to stem corruption, the new Cuba could be as messy as the old Cuba.

Fidel Castro did not bring corruption to Cuba; he merely institutionalized it. Official corruption has crippled Cuba since the colonial period, but Castro's state-run monopolies, cronyism, and lack of accountability have made Cuba one of the world's most corrupt states. The former communist countries in Eastern Europe were also extremely corrupt, and analyses of their transitional periods suggest that those who have taken measures to control corruption have had more successful transitions, regardless of whether the leadership tilted toward socialism or democracy. To that end, Díaz-Briquets and Pérez-López, both Cuban Americans, do not advocate any particular system for Cuba's next government, but instead prescribe uniquely Cuban policies to minimize corruption whatever direction the country takes after Castro. As their work makes clear, averting corruption may be the most critical obstacle in creating a healthy new Cuba.