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ePub Gifts from the Celestial Kingdom: A Shipwrecked Cargo for Gold Rush California download

by Thomas N. Layton

ePub Gifts from the Celestial Kingdom: A Shipwrecked Cargo for Gold Rush California download
Author:
Thomas N. Layton
ISBN13:
978-0804746915
ISBN:
0804746915
Language:
Publisher:
Stanford University Press; 1 edition (April 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1829 kb
Fb2 file:
1966 kb
Other formats:
lit doc docx txt
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
508

Gifts from the Celestial. has been added to your Cart

Gifts from the Celestial. has been added to your Cart. This is a fine investigative study and a pleasure to read. The Northern Mariner.

Thomas N. Layton is Professor of Anthropology at San Jose State University

Thomas N. Layton is Professor of Anthropology at San Jose State University. This fascinating study is an important contribution to the history and archaeology of the Gold Rush, and Layton's treatment of the material is refreshing and original.

Layton accomplishes his objectives by describing the full trajectory of the Frolic's final cargo from four different perspectives: from that of. .

Layton accomplishes his objectives by describing the full trajectory of the Frolic's final cargo from four different perspectives: from that of John Hurd Everett, the California merchant who assembled the cargo in China; then from the perspectives of the sailors and Pomo Indians who pillaged the cargo immediately after the wreck; then through the eyes of twentieth-century sport divers who plundered. it yet again; then, finally, through Layton's scientific perspective as an archaeologist. Lists with This Book.

Selected Works of Thomas N. Layton. Thomas N. Layton, San Jose State University. Gifts from the Celestial Kingdom: A Shipwrecked Cargo for Gold Rush California.

Gifts from the Celestial Kingdom: A Shipwrecked Cargo for Gold Rush California. In 1850 a sailing vessel was wrecked on the California coast with a rich cargo of Chinese goods bound for the Gold Rush. Winner of the 2004 James Deetz Award, sponsored by the Society for Historical Archaeology. The Voyage of the �Frolic: New England Merchants and the Opium Trade.

Gifts from the Celestial Kingdom: A Shipwrecked Cargo for Gold Rush California THOMAS N. LAYTON Stanford University Press, 2002. 233 p. b&w illus.

Arriving in Mexican California in 1832, Thomas O. Larkin (1802-1858) expected to become a rich man-and he.Gifts from the Celestial Kingdom: A Shipwrecked Cargo for Gold Rush California Thomas N. Layton Sınırlı önizleme - 2002. Larkin (1802-1858) expected to become a rich man-and he did: he became a successful merchant, financier, and land developer. Larkin also became the confidant of California officials, American consul to California, and secret agent of the president of the United States during the territory’s transition from Mexican to American control. Tüm Kitap Arama sonuçları Yazar hakkında (1995). Harlan Hague taught history at San Joaquin Delta College, Stockton, California.

JESSICA ZIMMER Layton: Gifts from the Celestial Kingdom: A Shipwrecked Cargo for Gold Rush California. SHELI O. SMITH Ruberstone: Grave Undertakings: An Archaeology of Roger Williams and the Narragansett Indians

JESSICA ZIMMER Layton: Gifts from the Celestial Kingdom: A Shipwrecked Cargo for Gold Rush California. SMITH Ruberstone: Grave Undertakings: An Archaeology of Roger Williams and the Narragansett Indians. ADRIAN O. MANDZY Miller: Drawing on the Past: An Archaeologist’s Sketchbook.

book by Thomas Layton

In a prior volume- The Voyage of the "Frolic": New England Merchants and the Opium Trade (Stanford, 1997)-historical archaeologist Thomas N. Laytontold the story of his excavation of an ancient Pomo Indian village site in Northern California, where, to his surprise, he recovered Chinese porcelain potsherds.

Gifts from the Celestial Kingdom: A Shipwrecked Cargo for Gold Rush California, Stanford University Press, 2002. Meanwhile, I have been seeking out and purchasing historic images of the Santa Clara Valley for the Sourisseau Academy Archive at SJSU. Date Completed: Sept.

In a prior volume―The Voyage of the "Frolic": New England Merchants and the Opium Trade (Stanford, 1997)―historical archaeologist Thomas N. Laytontold the story of his excavation of an ancient Pomo Indian village site in Northern California, where, to his surprise, he recovered Chinese porcelain potsherds. Tracing those sherds to a beach on the rugged Mendocino coast, he then followed them out to the submerged remains of the Frolic, a sailing vessel wrecked in the summer of 1850 with a rich cargo of Chinese goods bound for Gold Rush San Francisco. In that volume, Layton used the vessel's earlier role, transporting opium from Bombay to Canton, as a vehicle to tell the story of American participation in the opium trade. Although the Frolic's career as an opium clipper was ended in 1849 by the introduction of steam vessels, the almost simultaneous discovery of gold in California suddenly created enough purchasing power to support direct commerce with China―and thus a new career for the Frolic. In this sequel volume, Layton has two objectives. First, he employs the Frolic's ill-fated first, and final, cargo to San Francisco to tell the broader story of the beginnings of direct commerce between China and California. Second, he attempts to explore the potential of contextual archaeology―the intellectual process of "transporting" artifacts from their resting places back to the behavioral contexts in which they once functioned. Layton accomplishes his objectives by describing the full trajectory of the Frolic's final cargo from four different perspectives: from that of John Hurd Everett, the California merchant who assembled the cargo in China; then from the perspectives of the sailors and Pomo Indians who pillaged the cargo immediately after the wreck; then through the eyes of twentieth-century sport divers who plundered it yet again; then, finally, through Layton's scientific perspective as an archaeologist. To augment his quest for context, he employs carefully documented vignettes to fill the interstices between the facts. Throughout, he discusses his research―replete with visits to archives and antique shops―and in so doing introduces readers to the practice of modern historical archaeology.