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ePub Long Binh Jail: An Oral History of Vietnam's Notorious U.S. Military Prison download

by Cecil Barr Currey

ePub Long Binh Jail: An Oral History of Vietnam's Notorious U.S. Military Prison download
Author:
Cecil Barr Currey
ISBN13:
978-1574883374
ISBN:
1574883372
Language:
Publisher:
Potomac Books Inc (January 1, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1470 kb
Fb2 file:
1567 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
640

Long Binh Jail (commonly called LBJ, the "LBJ Ranch", or Long Binh Stockade) was a . military stockade located at Long Binh Post, in Đồng Nai Province, South Vietnam during the Vietnam War.

Long Binh Jail (commonly called LBJ, the "LBJ Ranch", or Long Binh Stockade) was a . 90% of the prisoners in the jail were African Americans. The Dignity and Pride handshake was created here. Long Binh Jail was established in 1966 by the US Army as a temporary stockade designed to hold about four hundred prisoners, located on Long Binh Post approximately 20 kilometers northeast of Saigon

Long Binh Jail was what the troops during the Vietnam War called the . Cecil B. Currey, USAR (Re., P.

Long Binh Jail was what the troops during the Vietnam War called the . is a former professor of military history at the University of South Florida and author of several books, including Victory at Any Cost: The Genius of Viet Nam's Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap.

A noted military historian examines the . military prison at Long Binh, which was so feared that American soldiers preferred to face the Viet Cong rather than be sent there. A noted military historian examines the . This overcrowded military prison was one of the most feared locations in all of Vietnam, the place where Army rule-breakers and dangerous criminals from throughout Vietnam were sent. Containing up to a thousand prisoners at a time, it was, in effect, the Army's own little penal colony and one sharply divided by race.

Long Binh Jail was established in 1966 by the US Army as a temporary stockade designed to hold about four hundred prisoners and was . Long Binh Jail: An Oral History of Vietnam's Notorious U. S. Military Prison.

Long Binh Jail was established in 1966 by the US Army as a temporary stockade designed to hold about four hundred prisoners and was located on Long Binh Post approximately 20 kilometers northeast of Saigon. It replaced a stockade that held about 200 prisoners located at Pershing Field, Tan Son Nhut Air Base at Saigon.

Long Binh Jail was established in 1966 by the US Army as a temporary stockade designed to. .Currey, Cecil Barr (2001). Kelley, Michael P. (2002)

Long Binh Jail was established in 1966 by the US Army as a temporary stockade designed to hold about four hundred prisoners and was located on Long Binh Post approximately 20 kilometers northeast of Saigon. (2002). Where We Were in Vietnam. Hellgate Press, Central Point, OR. ISBN 978-1-55571-625-7. Kolb, Joe. "Long Binh Jail Riot During the Vietnam War".

Whether it be original US GI replacement gun parts or newly manufactured replacements, you can find it at Sarco. Cecil Barr Currey -- A history of the . military prison for . We carry many obsolete gun parts as well as the standard gun parts people need today such as AR15, M16, M14, AK47, FAL,. 50 cal and many other machine gun parts. We also specialize in collectible military firearms parts such as 1911. 45 cal. Colt, Mauser, M1 Garand, M1 Carbine, 1919A4. Tell Us What You Think About This Product.

Noted military historian Cecil Barr Currey tells the story of Long Binh jail through the words of dozens of former guards, prisoners, and administrators. They reveal a disturbing aspect of the Vietnam War that has not been examined until no. -BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Long Binh Jail : an oral history of Vietnam's notorious . military prison, Cecil Barr Currey. Currey, Cecil B author. Publication Information.

History and operation Currey, Cecil Barr (2001).

History and operation. Long Binh Jail was established in 1966 by the US Army as a temporary stockade designed to hold about four hundred prisoners and was located on Long Binh Post approximately 20 kilometers northeast of Saigon. Sir! No Sir!, 2005 documentary film on enlisted opposition to Vietnam War.

In his compelling book, Long Binh Jail: An Oral History of Vietnam’s Notorious . Military Prison, Cecil Barr Currey captures the recollections of dozens of inmates who report humiliations and inhumane treatment ranging from the petty (verbal harassment and enforced push-ups) to the extreme (water-boarding and beatings). Prison Conditions in Vietnam.

Long Binh Jail was what the troops during the Vietnam War called the U.S. Army Installation Stockade in Long Binh, South Vietnam. This overcrowded military prison was one of the most feared locations in all of Vietnam, the place where Army rule-breakers and dangerous criminals from throughout Vietnam were sent. Within its razor-wire-bound confines were Americans whose offences ran the gamut: refusal of orders, drug possession, assault, rape, and murder. Containing up to a thousand prisoners at a time, it was, in effect, the Army's own little penal colony and one sharply divided by race. In 1968, most of its African-American prisoners took over the compound in a riot that was noted around the world as yet anther sign of U.S. forces' sagging morale. Military historian Cecil B. Currey tells the story of Long Binh Jail through interviews of dozens of former guards, prisoners, and adminstrators.
  • I entered the Army in 1974 and became a 95C (Military Police Correctional Specialist). At that time the Long Binh Jail riot was legendary, and we had a lecture on it in MP School. This book covers the riot and prison in great detail, and differs somewhat from our lecture about how the riot started. The terminology is all correct, the titles are all correct, and the MOS's all correct. What didn't differ from our lecture was the lack of training of the guards and inadequate staffing and overcrowding.

    Often books that are based on oral histories are hard to read because the quotes don't flow well. This book handles the quotes extremely well, and the narrative is great. The author does give more credence to the guards memories than the prisoners. It may be because I was a guard in a military prison myself, but I tend to agree with him. Many of the military prisoners I dealt with personally were childish and incapable of assuming personal responsibility. However, I think he does tend to downplay the prisoners's complaints about the stockade a bit more than necessary. Looking at the photos, it doesn't look like it was the most humane place to be put up in. It looks crowded. Prisoners in some areas of the stockade (Maximum Security for one) were kept in CONEX boxes (a type of shipping container), which in that heat would be horrible, and the layout gives too many places to hide which is never good for control in a prison and dangerous for guards and inmates and guards alike.

    He covers well the racial problems in the military at the time. When I went in a lot of that had passed by, but I did see some of it. He also covers well the disillusion with the Vietnam war by the troops over there. The mixture of poor living conditions, poor layout of the stockade, the attitude towards the war, and extreme racial anger made this a powder keg. One major item I have to point out that was different in this book and the lecture I got in MP School was that the NCO giving the lecture (who had been a guard at LBJ right before the riot) said that the prisoners locked up there were pretty much the worst of the worst. Commanders weren't willing to lock people up willy nilly because they were needed in the field. The book indicates just the opposite. Which is true? I don't know.

  • As a former prisoner of Long Binh Jail, Vietnam, I waited decades for someone to finally write a history of both the institution of the US Army Installation Stockade, known as the LBJ (Long Binh Jail) and the famous race riot that occurred there Aug 29, 1968. I give the author credit for doing the best he could with very limited resources. For prospective readers, this story is about the build-up to the riot and the violent riot that was instigated by an angry group of black prisoners. It turned into a raging inferno and became the largest military prison riot in American history. The author rely's heavily on info gathered from many interviews with former guards and prisoners and what little information that is available on the subject. It is amazing the vengence the black rioting prisoners attacked white prisoners and guards with, inflicting much injury and killing one prisoner; according to one testimony, a unit of MPs was dispatched with fixed drawn, possibly killing 18 rioting, attacking prisoners and torching most the buildings. The prison commandant was permanentally disabled when he was bludgeoned in the head by prisoners with bunk adapters. Prisoners the author misses are those who turned in their guns in the combat theater refusing to fight; many black soldiers were in this category. Author sides with guards who emphasize that all the prisoners were just a bunch of thugs and trouble makers who would have been in jail even if there was no war. I know that's not true because I was a prisoner there myself. The book is slightly misleading. Most of the prisoners were not the criminal type but were there following courts-martial for breaking military law, and many for refusing to fight. It's worth reading since it's the only book on the subject, but I believe it could use another edition and include the large number of men who were court martialled and imprisoned for committing acts of civil disobedience. Definitely an interesting read about a little-known subject, the huge riot at Long Binh Jail, S. Vietnam, during the turbulent year of 1968.

  • Insightful. When I was in Vietnam, it was rumored that the last place you wanted to end up was LBJ (Long Binh Jail). After reading this well written book I can readily see that the rumor was right.

  • Great reading for all, but if you were there it is a trip back in time, very good book!!!!

  • Upsetting commentary of US treatment of its own.

  • eye-opening

  • Excellent. Very accurate description of an unknown US version of a concentration camp

  • this book gives a clear picture of the break down in leadership and discipline in the vietnam war.from the highest commanders there was a lack of understanding of the type of soldier that the leaders were dealing with some of thes soldiers committed atrocious act of murder and mayhem this i feel that the leaders from the top down failed to realize that there was an criminal element in the war zone that LBJ was not equipped to deal with after conviction for felony charges these soldiers should have immediately sent back to the States for confinement.there is no way that what happened at LBJ should have occurred.