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by William W. Freehling

ePub Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, 1816-1836 download
Author:
William W. Freehling
ISBN13:
978-0195076813
ISBN:
0195076818
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (June 4, 1992)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1471 kb
Fb2 file:
1477 kb
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Rating:
4.4
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565

Freehling's title - Prelude to Civil War - is apt and intentionally challenging. The 'Nullification' controversy of the late 1820s and 1830s ostensibly focused on tariffs.

Freehling's title - Prelude to Civil War - is apt and intentionally challenging.

When William Freehling's Prelude to Civil War first appeare. There were many causes to South Carolina’s depression – old mortgages, specie drain, inadequate banks – but high tariffs gave people something concrete, a very visible threat to coalesce against. In one sense, the campaign against the tariff was the most articulate expression of South Carolina’s slowly awakening desire to end the avoidable aspects of the depression of the 1820s.

When William Freehling's Prelude to Civil War first appeared in 1965 it was immediately hailed as a brilliant and incisive study of the origins of the Civil Wa.

It tells the story of the Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, describing how from 1816 to 1836 aristocratic planters of the Palmetto State tumbled from a contented and prosperous life of elegant balls and fine Madeira wines to a world rife with economic distress, guilt over slavery, and apprehension of slave rebellion.

Freehling, William . 1935-. cn. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on November 4, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

William W. Freehling (born 1935) is an American historian, and Singletary Professor of the Humanities Emeritus at the University of Kentucky . Prelude to Civil War: the nullification controversy in South Carolina, 1816-1836. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-507681-3. Freehling has written several well-respected works on the American South during the antebellum era and on the American Civil War, most notably Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, which won the 1967 Bancroft Prize, and a. two-volume work on the antebellum period, Road to Disunion.

Prelude to Civil War. The Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, 1816-1836. William W. Freehling. Manufacturer: Oxford University Press, USA Release date: 4 June 1992 ISBN-10 : 0195076818 ISBN-13: 9780195076813. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Personal Name: Freehling, William . Publication, Distribution, et. New York by Union & states' rights a history and interpretation of interposition, nullification, and secession, 150 years after Sumtered.

Items related to PRELUDE TO CIVIL WAR; The nullification controversy. List this Seller's Books. Home FREEHLING, William W. PRELUDE TO CIVIL WAR; The nullification controversy in South. PRELUDE TO CIVIL WAR; The nullification controversy in South Carolina 1816-1836. FREEHLING, William W. Published by Harper & Row, NY, 1966. From Second Life Books, Inc. (Lanesborough, MA, . Payment Methods accepted by seller.

Books online: Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy in Southern Carolina, 1816-36, 1992 .

Books online: Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy in Southern Carolina, 1816-36, 1992, Fishpond. It was equally well-received by historical societies, garnering the Allan Nevins History Prize as well as a Bancroft Prize, the most prestigious history award of all.

When William Freehling's Prelude to Civil War first appeared in 1965 it was immediately hailed as a brilliant and incisive study of the origins of the Civil War. Book Week called it "fresh, exciting, and convincing," while The Virginia Quarterly Review praised it as, quite simply, "history at its best." It was equally well-received by historical societies, garnering the Allan Nevins History Prize as well as a Bancroft Prize, the most prestigious history award of all. Now once again available, Prelude to Civil War is still the definitive work on the subject, and one of the most important in ante-bellum studies. It tells the story of the Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, describing how from 1816 to 1836 aristocratic planters of the Palmetto State tumbled from a contented and prosperous life of elegant balls and fine Madeira wines to a world rife with economic distress, guilt over slavery, and apprehension of slave rebellion. It shows in compelling detail how this reversal of fortune led the political leaders of South Carolina down the path to ever more radical states rights doctrines: in 1832 they were seeking to nullify federal law by refusing to obey it; four years later some of them were considering secession. As the story unfolds, we meet a colorful and skillfully drawn cast of characters, among them John C. Calhoun, who hoped nullifcation would save both his highest priority, slavery, and his next priority, union; President Andrew Jackson, who threatened to hang Calhoun and lead federal troops into South Carolina; Denmark Vesey, who organized and nearly brought off a slave conspiracy; and Martin Van Buren, the "Little Magician," who plotted craftily to replace Calhoun in Jackson's esteem. These and other important figures come to life in these pages, and help to tell a tale--often in their own words--central to an understanding of the war which eventually engulfed the United States. Demonstrating how a profound sensitivity to the still-shadowy slavery issue--not serious economic problems alone--led to the Nullification Controversy, Freehling revises many theories previously held by historians. He describes how fear of abolitionists and their lobbying power in Congress prompted South Carolina's leaders to ban virtually any public discussion of the South's "peculiar institution," and shows that while the Civil War had many beginnings, none was more significant than this single, passionate controversy. Written in a lively and eminently readable style, Prelude to Civil War is must reading for anyone trying to discover the roots of the conflict that soon would tear the Union apart.
  • Interesting details leading up to the Civil War.

  • Very concise, an easy read & facts proven with 2 other very noteworthy books I had already read. Great source of S.C. history

  • an outstanding account of a most important period of u.s. history prior to the civil war

  • According to William Freehling -- and the evidence he amasses is extraordinarily convincing -- it really was "all about slavery"! The Civil War, that is, so if you, dear reader, have stubbornly asserted otherwise through the course of your benighted life, you'd better shun this book. It's always painful to be forced to admit that you were wrong!

    Freehling's title - Prelude to Civil War - is apt and intentionally challenging. The 'Nullification' controversy of the late 1820s and 1830s ostensibly focused on tariffs. Drawing from the speeches and writings of the advocates of Nullification, however, Freehling finds explicit and ample evidence that: 1) the most ardent advocates of the "right' of a state to nullify a federal law were consciously and cleverly using the tariff conflict as a 'dress rehearsal' for resistance to any federal interference with slavery; 2) while raging against the tariff, the most radical 'nullifiers' were already advoacting and preparing for secession decades before the election of Lincoln; 3) among the more moderate nullifiers, nullification was taken to be a means of 'preserving' the Union by severely curtailing the role of the Federal government; 4) the exposition of a 'States' Rights' interpretation of the Constitution always amounted essentially to a strategic defense of the institution of slavery. In other words, the State's Right South Carolinians valued above all was the right to perpetuate the state's primordial Wrong, to maintain their unique planters' oligarchy based on slavery, essentially their Right to a culture of arrogant indolence, lording it over the rest of ill-bred humanity.

    South Carolina, in the decades from the Revolution to Secession, was a distinctive society, economically, politically, and culturally at odds not only with the northern Free states but also with the other states of the slavocracy. Its economy was based on rice and premium long-staple cotton in the dominant tidewater region, but short-staple cotton in the piedmont, putting the state thus in uncomfortable competition with the slave states farther west. It had the largest percentage slave population in the slavocracy, with more than half of the human beings in the tidewater being slaves of African origin. It had a desperately unhealthy disease climate; mortality among both the slaves and those who drove them was horrific. Carolina's code of chivalry, scorning both honest labor and 'sordid' entrepreneurship, resulted in severe underdevelopment of financial institutions and of physical infrastructure. In another great book, David Hackett Fischer's 'Albion's Seed', the argument is made that Virginia and Carolina had in fact been populated originally by English 'cavaliers' and Englishmen of cavalier cultural sympathies, at least partially accounting for the persistent cultural antagonisms between the South and the 'Roundhead' North.

    It's a huge flaw in the basic, high-school level program of study of American history that nearly all the attention is given to 'national' events and developments. In fact, from the end of the Revolution until the Civil War, the most interesting and portentous developments were taking place in the various states, and the various states' histories reveal more about the dynamics of American growth than anything that happened in Washington DC. At the most obvious level, the budgets of the several richer states were larger and more complex than the budget of the Federal government in any year before the Civil War. Business patterns, especially corporation law, were evolving in the state legislatures and state courts, not in DC. To study antebellum America as a unified nation-state is to observe the wagging tail and ignore the dog. William Freehling's focused study of South Carolina, 1816-1836, is a superb model of states' historiography, and nicely written, too!

  • A decent source for some of the causes of the war. Tries to streatch the slavery issue to much. Led me to 2 more book orders.

  • With the possible exception of David M. Potter's classic "The Impending Crisis," William Freehling's "Prelude to Civil War: The Nullification Controversy in South Carolina, 1816-1836" is perhaps the best book written on antebellum America in the past 50 years. Originally published in 1965 and a recipient of the prestigious Bancroft Prize, Freehling's work is a beautifully written and persuasively argued case that the conventional wisdom about the nullification crisis of 1832 is grossly oversimplified and, in the end, fundamentally incorrect.

    Two points are central to Freehling's thesis: 1) growing anxiety over slavery and the nascent abolitionist movement - especially acute in the low country - was as important a factor in driving the aggressive states rights posture taken during the nullification crisis as was reaction to the tariff; and 2) South Carolinians themselves were as much to blame for their economic woes during the 1820s and 1830s as the "Tariff of Abominations."

    Freehling notes that you can often tell a lot about a society by disproportionate reactions to perceived threats. In this case, the South Carolinian response to the first faint rumblings of abolitionist agitation was far in excess to the actual threat posed in the 1820s and early 30s, according to the author. However, the extremely dense slave population in the South Carolina low country (in some areas slaves out numbered whites 5 to 1), the experience of the Denmark Vesey conspiracy in 1822, the mysterious arsonist fires in Charleston, the constant presence of Yankee peddlers and free black British seamen mixing with the slave population, and the slow but ultimately successful abolition campaign of William Wilberforce in England all conspired to create an environment of fear and doom among the South Carolina gentry.

    The traditional interpretation of the tariff's adverse impact in South Carolina was that the local planters were forced to trade their raw goods (in this case cotton) on the international open market but buy their end goods in a protected domestic market. Freehling concedes that there is some basis of truth to this claim, but only for a certain segment of the population. Some of the most ardent nullifiers were low country rice planters whose economic condition was relatively unaffected by the tariff and whose prices remained stable. The issue that welded the low country elite to an issue whose consequences were really absorbed by the up country was (in addition to inter marriage, school days at South Carolina College, etc.) the latter's growing fear of the abolitionists. Moreover, Freehling argues, gross absentee mismanagement of plantations, combined with a poor state financial infrastructure and a penchant to dramatically overspend for luxury items (the much needed specie often flowing outside of the state) were nearly as important in explaining the economic depression that gripped the region for over a decade as the tariff.

    Freehling makes his case eloquently and convincingly. For those with a serious interest in early 19th century American history - especially those interested in economic development, states rights doctrine, or the impact of abolitionism - this book cannot be more highly recommended.