mostraligabue
» » Vedanta for the West: The Ramakrishna Movement in the United States (Religion in North America)

ePub Vedanta for the West: The Ramakrishna Movement in the United States (Religion in North America) download

by Carl T. Jackson

ePub Vedanta for the West: The Ramakrishna Movement in the United States (Religion in North America) download
Author:
Carl T. Jackson
ISBN13:
978-0253330987
ISBN:
025333098X
Language:
Publisher:
Indiana University Press (May 22, 1994)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1496 kb
Fb2 file:
1151 kb
Other formats:
mobi mbr doc lrf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
722

Professor of History Carl Jackson has written an engrossing history of the Vedanta movement and Vedanta Society . Ultimately, "The success of the Ramakrishna movement in America has depended heavily on its ability to adapt to Western conditions

Professor of History Carl Jackson has written an engrossing history of the Vedanta movement and Vedanta Society in the Western world, and particularly America. Ultimately, "The success of the Ramakrishna movement in America has depended heavily on its ability to adapt to Western conditions. That ability in turn has hinged on the ability and termperament of its swamis.

An important history of the Ramakrishna movement, the very first and in many ways the most important Asian religious group to appear in the United States. ISBN13:9780253330987. Release Date:May 1994.

Vedanta for the West book. He details the origins and teachings of the movement, Swami Vivekananda's seminal role as founder and organizer of Western "work, " and the subsequent history of the American mission. Jackson also discusses the movement's American teachings and explains the attraction of Vedanta for Americans.

An important history of the Ramakrishna movement, the very first and in many ways the . This important book fills a gap in our knowledge. Bu kitaba önizleme yap . Kullanıcılar ne diyor? - Eleştiri yazın. Vedanta for the West: the Ramakrishna movement in the United States. Histories of Vedanta have appeared before, but they have been by devotees; Jackson's work demonstrates the objectivity and thoroughness of a trained. Tam incelemeyi okuyun.

The Vedanta philosophy. An address before the Graduate philosophical society of Harvard university, March 25, 1896.

ISBN: 9780253330987; Vedanta for the West – The Ramakrishna Movement in the United States. The Vedanta philosophy. Воспроизведено в оригинальной авторской орфографии изда от 457.

His contributions to the Vedanta Movement in America are well known, as are his lectures in print, which have become a popular source of inspiration . Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-33098-7.

His contributions to the Vedanta Movement in America are well known, as are his lectures in print, which have become a popular source of inspiration since the first collection was published in 1970. As her spiritual teacher, Gargi saw Ashokananda as a compassionate guide. An adherent of Advaita (non-dual) Vedanta, he was aware of the divinity of all life and he saw in his disciples their potential perfection.

Jackson, Carl T. Religion in North America. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1994. National Seminar on "Philosophy and Science of Value Education in Today's Context. Philosophy and Science of Value Education in the Context of Modern India. Kolkata: Ramakrishna Mission Institute of Culture, 2006. Sen, Amiya P. Swami Vivekananda. Author Bio. CARL T. JACKSON is Professor of History and Dean of the college of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas, El Paso. -Choice With admirable clarity and remarkable brevity, Jackson surveys the history of the movement and raises.

The history of religion in the United States begins in 1776 with the American Revolution. For religion in North America before that, see the histories of particular colonies or the traditions of the continent's diverse Indigenous peoples. Historians debate how influential Christianity was in the era of the American Revolution. Many of the founding fathers were active in a local church; some of them, such as Jefferson, Franklin, and Washington had Deist sentiments.

Ramakrishna Mission (RKM, Bengali : রামকৃষ্ণ মিশন) is a Hindu religious and spiritual organisation which forms the core of a worldwide spiritual movement known as the Ramakrishna Movement or the Vedanta Movement. The mission is named after and inspired by the Indian saint Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and founded by Ramakrishna's chief disciple Swami Vivekananda on 1 May 1897

This important book fills a gap in our knowledge.... Highly recommended."―Library Journal

... highly recommended... " ―Choice

With admirable clarity and remarkable brevity, Jackson surveys the history of the movement and raises... important issues... " ―The Journal of American History

An important history of the Ramakrishna movement, the very first and in many ways the most important Asian religious group to appear in the United States.

  • Professor of History Carl Jackson has written an engrossing history of the Vedanta movement and Vedanta Society in the Western world, and particularly America.

    Jackson first gives due credit to the Theosophical Society, "whose championing of Hindu ideals did much to awaken Indians' pride in their ancestral faith," and "In fact, the Theosophical Society was even more vociferous in its defense of Hinduism than were the Hindu reformers."

    The critical event, however, was the appearance of Swami Vivekananda and other Asian representatives at the Parliament of Religions in 1893, which "marked the first time authentic Asian teachers presented their faiths directly to Western Audiences. The appearance of Ramakrishna swamis in America in the 1890s inaugurated a new stage in the history of Eastern spirituality in the United States." Jackson adds, "If Ramakrishna was the spiritual founder of the Ramakrishna movement, his young disciple Swami Vivekananda was the movement's chief organizer and publicist," and he "almost singlehandedly created the Ramakrishna movement in America. He brought the movement west and gave it the direction and organizational form it has followed ever since."

    Life was not easy for the new movement, however. "Though the unprecedented events of the Parliament of Religions encouraged belief by Vedantists that America was wide open to Hinduism, the decades between 1890 and 1930 proved that the newly established Vedanta societies would have to struggle heroically for bare survival." Ultimately, "The success of the Ramakrishna movement in America has depended heavily on its ability to adapt to Western conditions. That ability in turn has hinged on the ability and termperament of its swamis. In the end, a swami either possessed the qualities and flexibility needed to lead a Vedanta society or did not."

    Who joins the Vedanta movement? "First, the typical member tends to come from a middle- or upper-middle class background.... Few religious movements of any size have attracted so many writers. Though there are notable exceptions, the typical Vedantist has tended to be better-educated, better traveled, and better off economically than a typical member of America's mainstream churches." Jackson notes, "Apparently, Vedanta's greatest attraction to Americans has been its perceived breadth and universalism."

    But Jackson also observes, "Measured in sheer numbers, subsequent Hindu movements have done much better. To cite one example, the Self-Realization Fellowship, introduced in the United States in 1920 by Swami Yogananda ... grew more in one decade than the Ramakrishna movement did in four." Still, when compared to Transcendental Meditation, and the Hare Krishna movement, "the Ramakrishna movement has represented a 'middle way' in American Hinduism."

    There are nevertheless problems on the horizon for the future. For example, "American-born monks may conduct classes, deliver lectures, and oversee a wide range of activities traditionally reserved for head swamis, but as yet no American swami has been entrusted to head an American center."

    This book is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED to anyone interested in Vedanta, Hinduism, eastern religions, alternative spirituality, or comparative religions.

  • One hundred years after the Vivekananda'a talks in Chicago at the World's Parliament of Religions in 1893, this book appears to trace and evaluate the spread of the Ramakrishna / Vedanta Movement in the USA. While he does no more than touch briefly on what the movement is doing presently in India, Jackson illustrates the peculiar forces at work in India and the US at the turn of the century that were so propitious to the movement's beginning. He shows the reasons for its early growth while so many other eastern religious imports languished and died, and sketches out the many causes of its later successes and failures. He does not go deeply into the theology or spirituality of Vedanta, but gives a brief summary of the lives of Ramakrishna and Vivekananda and their general teachings, and he contrasts the movement with the more modern USA phenomena of Krishna Consciousness and Transcendental Meditation. He suggests some of the strengths and weaknesses that will affect its future success. Most of the history of the movement has been written from within; it is good to have an outsider and a professional historian give his interpretation and present the various sides of the conflicts that have arisen. I think he presents an informative, objective, and balanced picture.

  • Written by a professor of history at the University of Texas, this medium sized book tells the story of the Ramakrishna-Vivekananda movement from it's asian and American preconditions, through it's origination, through it's first twenty difficult and upheaveled years up to the present time (ca. 1993). It also deals with questions like, how the organisation compares to other hindu groups in America, what the typical member looks like (, although this is based on too spare materials,), then what of the movements teachings appeals to western people etc. Highlights are topics like schisms, or the exclusion of of a swami from the organisation, who was a direct disciple of Ramakrishna. Then the many deaths of hartatacks of swamis, even one bombing. Although a scientific book, it reads nearly as easy as a novel. The number of facts Jackson has collected is amasing. Since he knows so much about the movement he can afford to write complitely unemotionally about the topic. Some of the critical statements he has hidden in the notes, probably for not totally offending the swamis. It has to be said, that this is not a spiritual book. The author avoids any spiritual statements. It's after all a history book.

  • I have not yet read this book, but I cannot wait too. what I have read of swami vivekananda is that celibacy lies at the heart of realisation of the self, and that having mastered that one vice, will overcome all obstacles in the wake of finding a pure leader of the vedanta societies wherever they are on the planet.