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by Walter T. Durham

ePub Nashville: The Occupied City, 1862-1863 download
Author:
Walter T. Durham
ISBN13:
978-1572336339
ISBN:
1572336331
Language:
Publisher:
Univ Tennessee Press; 1st edition (December 1, 2008)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1497 kb
Fb2 file:
1455 kb
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
597

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Nashville: The Occupied City, 1862-1863. The only thing I wish was that Durham would have supplied a map of Civil War Nashville, with a map of current day (or at least 1985 - when the book was originally written) Nashville

Nashville: The Occupied City, 1862-1863. 1572336331 (ISBN13: 9781572336339). The only thing I wish was that Durham would have supplied a map of Civil War Nashville, with a map of current day (or at least 1985 - when the book was originally written) Nashville.

Reluctant Partners: Nashville and the Union, 1863-1865. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2008. Nashville: The Occupied City, 1862-1863. Specifically, Jack H. Lepa's The Civil War in Tennessee, 1862-1863 and Walter T. Durham's two volumes, Nashville and Reluctant Partners, underscore the strategic importance of the western theater during the war. They are both timely, considering the increase in scholarly attention that the area has received.

Durham, Walter T. (2008). Reluctant Partners: Nashville and the Union, 1863-1865. Knoxville, Tennessee: University of Tennessee Press. Durham, Walter T.

Find nearly any book by Walter T Durham. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. by Walter T Durham, James W. Thomas, John F. Creasy. ISBN 9781572336339 (978-1-57233-633-9) Hardcover, Univ Tennessee Press, 2008. Find signed collectible books: 'Nashville: The Occupied City, 1862-1863'. Rebellion Revisited: A History Of Sumner County, Tennessee From 1861 To 1870. Nashville: The Occupied City, 1862–1863 (1985). Reluctant Partners: Nashville and the Union, 1863–1865 (1987)

Durham, Walter T. Reluctant Partners: Nashville and the Union, 1863–1865 (1987). McKenzie, Robert Tracy.

In this book, Walter T. Durham provides the first comprehensive examination of the role Tennessee and Tennesseans . Ethnicity: Walter T. Durham was of Caucasian, English, Scottish heritage. Durham provides the first comprehensive examination of the role Tennessee and Tennesseans played in creating a new state and a new society on the West Coast. Drawing from such archival sources as personal narratives in letters and diaries, public records, and newspaper reports, Durham has woven a wealth of information into his recounting of their adventures. Walter Thomas Durham was born on October 7, 1924 in Gallatin, Sumner County, Tennessee, United States. He was the son of George Franklin Durham and Celeste (McAlister) Durham.

Download PDF book format. Book's title: Nashville, the occupied city : 1862-1863 Walter T. Durham. Library of Congress Control Number

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Nashville, the occupied city : 1862-1863 Walter T. Library of Congress Control Number: 2008001838. Nashville: The Occupied City, 1862-1863 (1985). Reluctant Partners: Nashville and the Union, 1863-1865 (1987)

Durham, Walter T. Reluctant Partners: Nashville and the Union, 1863-1865 (1987).

In 1862, Nashville became the first Southern state capital to be captured by the Union Army; that occupation would not end until after the Civil War's conclusion in 1865. In two incisive books, first published more than twenty years ago and available once more for a new generation of readers, Walter T. Durham traces occupied Nashville's reluctant transition from Rebel stronghold to partner of the Union.    Together, Nashville and Reluctant Partners highlight the importance of local history within Civil War scholarship and assess the impact of the war on people other than combat soldiers and places other than battlefields. Nashville examines the first seventeen months of the Union occupation, showing how the local population coped with the sudden presence of an enemy force. It also explores the role of military governor Andrew Johnson and how he asserted his authority over the city. Reluctant Partners depicts a city coming to grips with the rapidly fading prospect of a Confederate victory and how, faced with this reality, its citizens began to cooperate with Johnson and the Union. Their reward was a booming economy and scant battle damage.    With new prefaces discussing the two decades of scholarship that have emerged since these books' original appearance, these volumes offer an absorbing view of Union occupation at the most local of levels. Durham's volumes remain at the forefront of reconsidering the Civil War in the Upper South. Students and scholars of the Civil War-particularly in its social dimensions-as well as devotees of Tennessee history will find these new editions invaluable.
  • For Nashville and Civil War historians (or history freaks like me) this is a must read! Detailed and well researched, the author gives you a wonderful view of the city and it's inhabitants, including the surrounding areas and events, during the beginning of the war.

  • The Union capture of Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River at Dover, Tennessee, left the city of Nashville wide open to Union occupation. The city had never gotten around to building military defenses although they had been planned and budgeted. The city's residents couldn't believe that Confederate troops were moving through the city in a repositioning that was a retreat from the area and not taking up positions to defend the city. Union troops moved in at their leisure from Edgeville, the town directly across the Cumberland from Nashville.

    Nashville was a Union prize not only because of its military value in being on a major navigable river in the western front of the Civil War and having the size and facilities to serve as a supply depot for forces throughout this front, but also because it was, like other cities throughout the South, a prominent symbol of the Confederate cause. The population of Tennessee's capital Knoxville was almost evenly divided between Union and Confederate sympathizers before the War began. Nashville's population, however, had been practically entirely pro-Confederate even before the War.

    As the first major Confederate city to come under Union occupation, Nashville was a test case for other important cities which would come under occupation with the advances of Union forces in the last phases of the Civil War and into Reconstruction. But the occupation of Nashville was also unique in that it occurred while the war was still being waged and the ultimate victor was still in doubt.

    Though Union forces had a grip on the city, the grip was tenuous. They might be pushed out at some future point; they might withdraw with the defeat of Union forces elsewhere; and they would surely withdraw with the defeat of the North by the Confederacy. This ambivalence based on the unpredictabilites of the strategic and ultimate military turns made for an ambivalence in the population of Nashville. Among this population were varying degrees of cooperation, resignation, resistance, and defiance. Some residents urged acceptance of the Union occupation; while others made symbolic acts of defiance, and were put under guard for doing so; while still others engaged in sabotage. Confederate cavalry forces remained active in ways that could be seen as harassment or as probes for a Confederate plan to retake the city. No one knew.

    Durham handles all of the dimensions of the Federal occupation of Nashville in the period from February 1862 to June 1863. The necessarily central, historical figure at the center of this is Andrew Johnson; who became Lincoln's vice president for his second term for his notable role as "military governor of Nashville" beginning in March 1863. The study of occupied Nashville cannot be separated from the study of Johnson as military governor.

    Durham--author of 18 books on different Civil War topics--wrote with the modest aim of adding to "the smaller body of Civil War literature that treats the impact of the war on people other than combat soldiers and places other than battlefields." But Civil War, Southern, and social historians and others will recognize that his topic while treated by him as limited in scope and secondary in interest to the military conflict is of keen interest because of its originality, research, and picture it presents. Durham lays down all of the right kinds of facts to understand the situation of the occupation of Nashville and the significant and sometimes crucial issues it involves; which issues underlied the Civil War, continued through Reconstruction, and have not yet been completely played out in American history. Such readers will also want to turn to the author's companion work "Reluctant Partners - Nashville and the Union, 1863-1865" picking up where this one leaves off, to include the large-scale Confederate effort to regain the city.