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ePub A Decent, Orderly Lynching: The Montana Vigilantes download

by Frederick Allen

ePub A Decent, Orderly Lynching: The Montana Vigilantes download
Author:
Frederick Allen
ISBN13:
978-0806136370
ISBN:
0806136375
Language:
Publisher:
University of Oklahoma Press (November 8, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1756 kb
Fb2 file:
1337 kb
Other formats:
mbr lrf mbr lit
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
837

The deadliest campaign of vigilante justice in American history erupted in the Rocky Mountains during the Civil War when a private army hanged twenty-one troublemakers

The deadliest campaign of vigilante justice in American history erupted in the Rocky Mountains during the Civil War when a private army hanged twenty-one troublemakers. Hailed as great heroes at the time, the Montana vigilantes are still revered as founding fathers.

The deadliest campaign of vigilante justice in American history erupted in the Rocky Mountains during the Civil War when a private army hanged twenty-one troublemakers. has been added to your Cart. Hailed as great heroes at the time.

Hailed as great heroes at the time, the Montana vigilantes are still revered as founding fathers. But Allen has uncovered evidence that the vigilantes refused to. disband after territorial courts were in place.

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The Montana Vigilantes.

Mr. Allen explained that the founders of Montana formed a vigilante group that killed criminals during the 19th century gold rush

Mr. Allen explained that the founders of Montana formed a vigilante group that killed criminals during the 19th century gold rush. He was interviewed on the BookTV Bus in Bozeman, Montana. People in this video. Frederick Allen Author. Your purchase helps support C-SPAN.

Allen, Frederick (2005). Montana Vigilantes 1863-1870 Gold, Guns and Gallows. Logan, UT: Utah State University Press. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press.

The deadliest campaign of vigilante justice in American history erupted in the Rocky Mountains during the Civil War when a private army hanged twenty-one troublemakers. Hailed as great heroes at the time, the Montana vigilantes are still revered as founding fathers.

Combing through original sources, including eye-witness accounts never before published, Frederick Allen concludes that the vigilantes were justified in their early actions, as they fought violent crime in a remote corner beyond the reach of government.

But Allen has uncovered evidence that the vigilantes refused to disband after territorial courts were in place. Remaining active for six years, they lynched more than fifty men without trials. Reliance on mob rule in Montana became so ingrained that in 1883, a Helena newspaper editor advocated a return to “decent, orderly lynching” as a legitimate tool of social control.

Allen’s sharply drawn characters, illustrated by dozens of photographs, are woven into a masterfully written narrative that will change textbook accounts of Montana’s early days—and challenge our thinking on the essence of justice.

  • I like the book for the awesome research that was put into bringing out many of the facts surrounding the history of the gold camps. You'll see what lengths men will go when they find themselves in a place without law and the need to protect what is theirs.

    I think Mr. Allen does a great service to the people of Montana with this effort although I dropped my rating to 4-stars because he did some minor editorializing over the actions of folks who don't share his modern values. That part is minor but it did detract from the view he presents.
    He did a great job in ferreting out many of the details of the lives of many of the historical figures presented and did an outstanding job of bringing their voices to life with letters and diary entries written by those folks. It made for a better take on the time and the difference between the 'public' story and what actually happened in those rough and tumble times of one hundred fifty years ago. He shows the mix of people, the miners looking for gold, the sutlers and merchants who were there to supply those miners, the saloons with their various wares, and finally the settlers come to 'tame the wilderness' - all finding the hard life being made harder by those willing to rob and kill.
    In the end, he makes the case that the Committee of Vigilance probably did good work in the beginning, but things went a bit overboard towards the end of things. A decent, orderly lynching turned basically to murder of whoever didn't fit the mold being bandied about by the various interests in the Committee itself.
    This will go into my personal library, without qualm, as an honest work of scholarship - my caveat aside.

  • People who hate "High Noon" have been known to cite the goings-on in Idaho Territory of the 1860s as proof that an enraged citizenry would never back down from outlaws. According to "eyewitness accounts," a locally formed vigilance committee rounded-up Sheriff Henry Plummer and his bloodthirsty compatriots and, with the aid of lots of rope, soon put an end to the rampant murder and robbery in the gold camps.

    While this account made for excellent melodrama, it was a bit too pat to stand the test of time, and of late, had become the center of some arguing and fist shaking in the vicinity of Alder Gulch. Frederick Allen painstakingly examines the players and their times. His conclusions will not please the revisionists nor the vigilante apologists. While the vigilantes started out with the best of intentions and went after the worst of the thugs, their focus was lost in the chaos and power struggles of their era. Like many mavericks, they went from being heroes to embarassments.

    But Allen confirms that Henry Plummer, George Ives & Co. were not martyrs of misdirected justice. It's too bad the vigilantes didn't have the forsight to stop while they were ahead.

  • Very well researched and well written account about this dark chapter in Montana's early history. Allen does a fine job of telling the story of Henry Plummer and the other key figures who played roles in the violence of the Montana mining camps of the 1860s.

  • Surprisingly interesting book about a period of history that rarely is written with such detail.

  • Very well written, and informative. Enjoyed it very much.

  • I agree with most of the other comments about this book, Allen did do a very good job of research and telling us the details of the vigilantes from the historical documents available to him. But he does not show any sympathy for the state of affairs of these early settlers to frontier Montana, and his present day political biases show through in rather irritating ways. His closing sentence of the book was especially irritating to me, I will quote. "Given Montana's continued, fretful association with various scofflaw organizations and its unwanted reputation as a place without speed limits or other boundaries on personal behavior, we might do well to acknowledge the excesses and inherent abuse of power carried out by men who for too many years refused to bow to the police and courts and the rule of law".
    It is a pretty tall leap from his idea about "no speed limit" (in fact the speed limit is "safe and prudent") to telling us the citizens are without respect for law, police or courts.

  • It presents a wonderful richness of detail, and Allen's overview brings together otherwise confusing and murky and perspectives on figures like Henry Plummer and Granville Stewart. And he does it in a way that makes these characters real and believable. It presents an insight into a time and place where the impulse to vigilantism was understandable, even necessary, but Allen also shows how quickly and easily the impulse spins out of control and belies the vigilante's claims to serve order and justice.

  • I am well read on the subject of Montana's Vigilantee's. This is by far the best work on that topic. The author obviously did a massive amount of research - filled in a lot of blanks for me. This is a fantastic book - very well written