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ePub The Complete Idiot's Guide to the American Revolution download

by Ph.D. Alan Axelrod

ePub The Complete Idiot's Guide to the American Revolution download
Author:
Ph.D. Alan Axelrod
ISBN13:
978-0028633794
ISBN:
0028633792
Language:
Publisher:
Alpha Books; 1st edition (2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1613 kb
Fb2 file:
1966 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf docx lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
725

You're no idiot, of course. You know that the American Revolution started when those guys in Boston threw some tea off a boat

You're no idiot, of course. You know that the American Revolution started when those guys in Boston threw some tea off a boat. Or was it when Paul Revere made his famous ride? Let's face it: when it comes to knowing about our nation's struggle for independence, our grade-school memories are about as trustworthy as Benedict Arnold.

Complete Idiot's Guide to World War I. P. You're no idiot, of course. You know that the American Revolution started when those guys in Boston threw some tea off a boat

Complete Idiot's Guide to World War I.

Where the first Americans came from. The Mayas, Incas, and Aztecs. The Anasazi, Mound Builders, and Pueblos. Leif Eriksson, first European in America. Look at a map that shows the north Pacific Ocean

Where the first Americans came from. Look at a map that shows the north Pacific Ocean. You’ll find the Bering Sea, an arm of the Pacific bounded on the east by Alaska, on the south by the Aleutian Islands, and on the west by Siberia and the Kamchatka Peninsula. Near the north end of the Bering Sea is the Bering Strait, which, lying between Alaska and Siberia, connects the Bering Sea with the Chukchi Sea of the Arctic Ocean

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United States - History - Revolution, 1775-1783. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on May 4, 2012.

Alan Axelrod is a renowned historian and business writer. He was the co author of the New York Times bestseller What Every American Should Know About American History as well as the BusinessWeek bestsellers Patton on Leadership and Elizabeth I, CEO. He has written extensively on the Civil War. Библиографические данные.

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The complete idiot's guide to small business for Canadians. Includes index 24 A Merger CIG Sm Busi. No part of this book shall be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, THE COMPLETE IDIOT'S The Comp.

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Alpha Books, 1999 - 396 sayfa. Yazar hakkında (1999). Alan Axelrod is a renowned historian and business writer. This book covers the history of every American president from George Washington to the present day (up to the inauguration of president Obama). It contains hundreds of pertinent and interesting facts. Tam incelemeyi okuyun. Bu kitaba yapılan referanslar.

Author: Alan Axelrod. Publisher: Alpha, New York, 2003.

Complete Idiot’s Guide to American History. Author: Alan Axelrod. Complete Idiot’s Guide to American History.

You're no idiot, of course. You know that the American Revolution started when those guys in Boston threw some tea off a boat. Or was it when Paul Revere made his famous ride? Let's face it: when it comes to knowing about our nation's struggle for independence, our grade-school memories are about as trustworthy as Benedict Arnold. Don't blush red (or white, or blue) yet! The Complete Idiot's Guide to the American Revolution is an authoritative overview of the conflict, filled with little-known facts that will enlighten even the most educated history buff. In this Complete Idiot's Guide, you get:
  • Very good!

  • I first purchased the book when it was released in order to brush up on my knowledge of history of the American Revolution era. At the time, I was fascinated by the lives of my own ancestors who fought in that war, and wanted to better understand the world events that were happening around them. This book was a great crash course in the subject. Now, fifteen years later, I'm a writer and have just completed my first novel — which takes place in 1765, by the way — and although I've researched the era a great deal from other sources, this book continues to be my quick, take-along reference for dates and events of the period.

  • The task is an enormous one: How to explain jazz to someone who has little or no understanding of the musical genre. Just what is jazz? Maybe it really is a question that can only be answered by the famous Louis Armstrong quote, "If you've gotta ask, you'll never know."
    But give Axelrod credit. He gives the subject expert treatment. Whether you know absolutely nothing about jazz (or any music, for that matter), or whether you have a degree in music, you'll learn plenty in this well-formatted book.
    The author wisely gives readers a general overview of what constitutes jazz, what some of the major trends were, and a who's who of famous musicians. Axelrod does NOT immediately launch into a chronological history of jazz and that's a plus. Jazz does not have cut-and-dried periods. It's style changes intertwine and sometimes reemerge after years (and decades) of inactivity. After the first few chapters when Axelrod DOES get into more of a chronological look at jazz, it makes more sense. The foundation he has built can withstand a look at the various subgenres at that point. This makes for a much clearer reading and understanding of jazz.
    Axelrod gives brief bios of the major players and band leaders. If you want to know more, he tells you where you can continue your search. Also very helpful is a listing of 25 "must have" recordings for the beginner, and an expanded list for those ready to branch out. Also provided are glossaries of musicians and jazz terms.
    Some critics have knocked the book for not providing a sampler CD. Let me point out that the outstanding Ken Burns 5 CD boxed set covering the history of jazz barely scratches the surface. A "sampler" CD just won't do.
    A great book for the beginning, intermediate, or veteran jazz fan.
    approx. 300 pages

  • Great book to help get a sense of what things were going on when my ancestors were deciding which side to fight for and the general issues surrounding the revolution.... I hated history in school, but genealogy has made it much more appealing. Nice to have a book that gets to the point and isn't horrid to read.

  • I really must be part of the target market for this publisher! I got this book expecting, on the basis of its own promotional blurb, to find unsettling new interpretations and lots of attention to aspects of the Revolution not covered by the traditional New Englandish historiography, such as the importance of anxiety about anti-slavery activity in England, the role of colonial debt especially in the Southern colonies, the lure of western land speculation, English policies concerning colonial expansion into lands acquired from France, etc. But here's the surprise: there's nothing new or iconoclastic about this book at all, except a general tenor of pandering to the fringe readers who buy these publications. You'll find much more revolutionary insights into the American Revolution in almost any recent high school textbook. And you'll find more up-to-date statements of the causes of the Revolution in the words of the committee that wrote a well-known document beginning "When, in the course of human events..."

  • Ever wonder why Miles Davis is so revered among Jazz fans?

    Was Charlie Parker one of the guys who lasted decades or died too young?

    What was Louis Armstrong's major contribution to jazz development?

    How should I start my jazz collection and do it economically?

    Which instruments can be used to play jazz and which cannot?

    What is really the difference between jazz and popular anyway?

    Where is jazz headed and what's happening with it now?

    If you ask questions like these, then this Idiot's Guide to Jazz is for you (and me). There is also good historical depth/anecdotes that may interest more experienced jazz fans, but the book's primary purpose is to help those of us who find jazz mostly bewildering but have heard enough we like to be somewhat interested.

    The first 20% of the book doesn't just jump straight into history but provides a gentle introduction for a present day audience who may just be wondering what jazz is (high level), where to go to hear it, what instruments are popular (or possible - basically anything goes). Describes the general shape of the spirit of jazz, why it is unique and worthy of further investigation.

    The remaining 250 pages really make an easy reading, accessible chronological history of jazz starting all the way back, not just too New Orleans but Africa and Europe. From those roots it gradually builds up the story of jazz and its major artists/style/hotbeds, etc. Jazz before and after Armstrong, New York, Kansas City, Miles Davis. How each artist and location affected the sound, how swing, bebop, cool, hard bop, fusion, avant-garde came about, etc. it's all here. I have a much better picture now of what era and phase of development I am hearing when I listen to any major artist, from any era. There are still some fine points, especially on someone like Miles Davis since he morphed through three or four different phases, but at least I know that much now. The book is a good reference to learn from after the first reading as well.

    The author has a background as a historian apart from jazz so he is skilled at getting below the popular jazz critic understanding of events like WWII to some interesting analysis that really makes sense. Jazz really is a reflection of the American experience both good and bad. He does a terrific job of showing this. The author is very open to all sorts of jazz. Not a high brow, jazz clique type, he really wants more people to learn how to enjoy jazz. But he's not just mush either. He offers enough informed opinion to help guide you through what you might like and might not.

    As you can see I like the book and have found it very helpful. My only criticisms are minor. I wish there was a listening guide CD to go with the book. The problem is, the story is so comprehensive that one CD would really not be enough (two or three minimum) so the price would be much higher. Just a wishful thought, but it would really help. I thought the early part of the history dragged just a bit, maybe because I was anxious to get into the mid-twentieth century where I could relate a little better. There is a lot of early jazz history, but there's a lot of history here for all jazz eras as well. As I mentioned, you can use this book as an informal reference on all major jazz artists/phases so if you read it straight through it is a little long. Can't have it both ways - short and detailed - so I think the author has done a fine job striking the balance to deliver a book of lasting value.

    I really like the book. The copy I read was checked out of the library (another good source for jazz the author briefly mentions) and I am thinking of buying my own copy to use as reference. This book really has really helped me get started and probably will help more in the future.