mostraligabue
» » The Americas That Might Have Been: Native American Social Systems through Time

ePub The Americas That Might Have Been: Native American Social Systems through Time download

by Julian Granberry

ePub The Americas That Might Have Been: Native American Social Systems through Time download
Author:
Julian Granberry
ISBN13:
978-0817314576
ISBN:
0817314571
Language:
Publisher:
University Alabama Press; 2nd ed. edition (April 6, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1563 kb
Fb2 file:
1990 kb
Other formats:
doc mbr lit txt
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
793

Rosenthal's book successfully highlights "kinships often difficult to identify when authors are classified exclusively according to national boundaries" (p. 143). This work answers the hypothetical question: What would the Americas be like today-politically, economically, culturally-if Columbus and the Europeans had never found them, and how would American peoples interact with the world's other societies?

The Americas That Might . .has been added to your Cart. He reveals the spectacular futures these brilliant pre-Columbian societies might have had, if not for one epochal meeting that set off a chain of events so overwhelming to them that the course of human history was forever changed.

The Americas That Might .

-North Dakota Quarterly

That Might Have Been : Native American Social Systems Through Time.

The Americas That Might Have Been : Native American Social Systems Through Time.

Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. How Humans and Apes Are Different, and Why It Matters.

The Native Americans claim that they have lived there since the beginning of time The name, though it was wrong, stuck to the local people and has been used to the present day.

The Native Americans claim that they have lived there since the beginning of time. There is also an opinion that they migrated there in prehistoric times via the Bering Strait Land Bridge. All these are still only hypotheses. C) When Christopher Columbus landed, he thought he had reached India and called all the native people Indians.

The Native American name controversy is an ongoing discussion about the changing terminology used by the indigenous peoples of the Americas to describe themselves, as well as how they prefer to be referred to by others. Preferred terms vary primarily by region and age. As indigenous people and communities are diverse, there is no consensus on naming, aside from the fact that most people prefer to be referred to by their specific nation.

Are you sure you want to remove The Americas that might have been from your list? There's no description for this book yet.

The Americas that might have been Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Imagines the development of the Western Hemisphere without European contact and colonization.

This work answers the hypothetical question: What would the Americas be like today—politically, economically, culturally—if Columbus and the Europeans had never found them, and how would American peoples interact with the world's other societies? It assumes that Columbus did not embark from Spain in 1492 and that no Europeans found or settled the New World afterward, leaving the peoples of the two American continents free to follow the natural course of their Native lives.

The Americas That Might Have Been is a professional but layman-accessible, fact-based, nonfiction account of the major Native American political states that were thriving in the New World in 1492. Granberry considers a contemporary New World in which the glories of Aztec Mexico, Maya Middle America, and Inca Peru survived intact. He imagines the roles that the Iroquois Confederacy of the American Northeast, the powerful city-states along the Mississippi River in the Midwest and Southeast, the Navajo Nation and the Pueblo culture of the Southwest, the Eskimo Nation in the Far North, and the Taino/Arawak chiefdoms of the Caribbean would play in American and world politics in the 21st Century.

Following a critical examination of the data using empirical archaeology, linguistics, and ethnohistory, Granberry presents a reasoned and compelling discussion of native cultures and the paths they would have logically taken over the past five centuries. He reveals the spectacular futures these brilliant pre-Columbian societies might have had, if not for one epochal meeting that set off a chain of events so overwhelming to them that the course of human history was forever changed.

Julian Granberry is Language Coordinator with Native American Language Services in Florida and author of numerous publications, including A Grammar and Dictionary of the Timucua Language.

Additional reviews:

"Offers the latitude to explain a model of cultural evolution based on kinship categories while speculating about hjow several Indian nations might have developed sans colonialism."—North Dakota Quarterly

"Granberry offers scenarios that should have us thinking of the innumerable possible trajectories that these societies might have followed had they not been impacted by Europeans."—Journal of Anthropological Research

  • The book claims to be a consideration of how the Americas might have developed if Columbus had never set sail. In fact only 20% of the text covers this topic, and that's sketchy and unimaginative.

    Most of the book is devoted to the author's pet theory: that the most important determining factor in a culture is the kinship system. The six systems recognised by anthropologists are assigned to three types of society. You might think that the division in Europe is between north and south, but that is dismissed as "cosmetic". The real division is apparently between the Scandinavians and Serbs on the one hand and everyone else on the other. It seems that the Scandinavians are "communists" and English speakers find them "devious" and "untrustworthy". Not in Britain, we don't! We are also told that the clash of kinship systems between Serbs and Croats explains their political enmity (in fact, they have the same system), that Germanic and Romance languages have different systems (they don't), and that the Chinese language doesn't distinguish nouns from verbs (all languages do). And this from a man who was a linguistics professor!

  • The author writes an interesting introduction, pigeonholes cultures into Unitary, Dualistic, and Trinary societies, and then further proves himself to be the consummate Western dualistic thinker of his own description by portraying the various Native American civilizations as angelic and the dualistic Europeans as satanic.

    My favorite moment (of hundreds--every page contains a howler or three) is when the author devotes one paragraph to explaining that Aztec human sacrifice was seen as a good thing by all parties, and those to be sacrificed were honored and given a year to live high off the hog. Human sacrifice, we are told, shouldn't be judged by Western standards (which, I guess, are bad because they frown upon human sacrifice?). In the very next paragraph the author then rolls right over the fact that war captives were also sacrificed. Alert readers might wonder if they too were honored and given a year of free lunch, but the author doesn't bother to elaborate on that one as the facts might not be suitably Disney-esque.

    In another example of the author's classically Western absolutist black & white thinking we're told we shouldn't dismiss the cruelty of the Spanish conquistadors of AD 1500 with "that's the way people were back then" because this is just how it is with dualistic societies, all the time, regardless.

    The author might want to spend time seriously studying the thinking of the non-dualistic societies he clearly likes, the ones that view morality in terms of shades-of-gray or that try to understand actions in context. Then he should rewrite this Old Testament diatribe so it isn't a mini-monument to modern Western academic cognitive dissonance. Or maybe uncontrollably dualistic Western academics (who are, according to the author, no different than bloodthirsty conquistadors of 500 years ago) should simply disqualify themselves from the social sciences since, as the author's thinking clearly suggests, they are unalterably incapable of even-handed objectivity. This book is a good argument for that.

    Overall, a deeply disappointing read that should fire up all the congenitally dualistic Western culture warriors. Highly recommended to fans of "Avatar," or those currently whitewashing the history of Islamic slavery. Two stars because the book wasn't 100% awful.