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ePub A History of Kentucky download

by Thomas Dionysius Clark

ePub A History of Kentucky download
Author:
Thomas Dionysius Clark
ISBN13:
978-0945084303
ISBN:
0945084307
Language:
Publisher:
Jesse Stuart Foundation; Edition Unstated edition (August 1, 1992)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1255 kb
Fb2 file:
1253 kb
Other formats:
rtf lit docx azw
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
994

Thomas Dionysius Clark (July 14, 1903 – June 28, 2005) was an American historian.

Thomas Dionysius Clark (July 14, 1903 – June 28, 2005) was an American historian. Clark saved from destruction a large portion of Kentucky's printed history, which later became a core body of documents in the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives. Often referred to as the "Dean of Historians" Clark is best known for his 1937 work, A History of Kentucky. Clark was named Historian Laureate of the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1991.

Clark writes about Kentucky in her proper setting in the national picture. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way)

Clark writes about Kentucky in her proper setting in the national picture. This standard college history text includes bibliographical references and index. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Only 20 left in stock (more on the way).

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A History of Kentucky Hardcover. Thomas Dionysius Clark. In this book Thomas Clark has painted a rich panorama of history and life along the river, peopled with the famous and infamous, ordinary folk and legendary characters. It is a canvas distinctly emblematic of the American experience. In the beginnings were occasional European explorers, John Swift's fabulous silver lode, and the lonely outpost of Boonesborough. As later romantic figures of the state, the mountaineer vied with the planter.

When Thomas D. Clark was hired to teach history at the University of Kentucky in 1931, he began a career that . Born in 1903 on a cotton farm in Louisville, Mississippi, Thomas Dionysius Clark would follow a long and winding path to find his life's passion in the study of history. Clark was hired to teach history at the University of Kentucky in 1931, he began a career that would span nearly three-quarters of a century and would profoundly change not only the history department and the university but the entire Commonwealth.

Homemade liquor has played a prominent role in the Appalachian economy for nearly two centuries. The region endured profound transformations during the extreme prohibition movements of the nineteenth century, when the manufacturing and sale of alcohol - an integral part of daily life for many Appalachians - was banned.

By the flip of a coin, Thomas Dionysius Clark became intertwined in the vast history of Kentucky

By the flip of a coin, Thomas Dionysius Clark became intertwined in the vast history of Kentucky. In 1928, Clark received scholarships to both the University of Cincinnati and to the University of Kentucky. Kentucky won the coin toss and the claim to one of the South's eminent historians. While many know of Clark as the state's historian laureate and from his 32 books, these personal observations reveal what he has accomplished behind the scenes in areas such as the environment, archives and education. Clark is a genuine hero because he is mortal, pragmatic and inspired. With this book we salute him and his works.

A history of Kentucky. The rural press and the new South.

Dr He taught at the University of Kentucky from 1931 until 1965, when he retired as. .Thomas Dionysius Clark was born in Louisville, Miss.

He taught at the University of Kentucky from 1931 until 1965, when he retired as chairman of the history department.

Book Description: By the flip of a coin, Thomas Dionysius Clark became intertwined in the vast history of Kentucky. In 1928, Clark received scholarships to both the University of Cincinnati and to the University of Kentucky

Book Description: By the flip of a coin, Thomas Dionysius Clark became intertwined in the vast history of Kentucky. In 1990, when the Kentucky General Assembly honored Clark by declaring him Kentucky's Historian Laureate for life, Governor Brereton Jones described Clark as "Kentucky's greatest treasure

New edition of original 1937 publication. Clark writes about Kentucky in her proper setting in the national picture. This standard college history text includes bibliographical references and index.
  • I knew this book was dated when I ordered it so I got what I expected. I purchased it specifically for the purpose of understanding some of the perceptions of Kentucky (and Kentuckians) during the time it was written. I had hoped for more information on the pre-settlement history so was a bit disappointed on that front. I'm still searching for something told by the perspectives of American Indians about pre-settlement/pre-"frontier" times...if you have suggestions, please share. The Clark book was fine for what it was intended to do, but don't expect to get an "honest" and "unbiased" report from reading it. It largely deals with the political aspects of Kentucky's formation as a state. For a history pre-dating that, you'll need to keep searching.

  • I agree with the previous reviewer. This is a great starting point for someone interested in Kentucky history and definitely a "read before" reading "A New Kentucky History". It lays the foundation concerning the earliest portions of Kentucky history and really helped me understand the beginnings of my adopted home state. I would not have enjoyed A New Kentucky History nearly as much had I not read this book first. Well written and engrossing, a definite must have for anyone interested in the Bluegrass State. Yes, I know it's really a Commonwealth :)

  • This book hasn't been as helpful as I was hoping. But it is in great shape and I'm hoping to refer back to it as we continue to research our ancestors.

  • As a student at UK, I had the privilege of taking classes with Dr.Clark. In my estimation he is the most accomplished and knowledgable historian,

  • I use this book when I'm tracking my ancestors and understanding the society they lived in during that period of time in Kentucky.

  • Dr Clarks History of Kentucky is informative and a very easy read. He loved his adopted state and gave much back.

  • I grew up in Kentucky but now live in California. Dr. Clark was my history professor at the University of Kentucky in the 1960s. He was one of the most interesting teachers I encountered. This book was the textbook but he supplemented it with his engrossing lectures. He also made attendance in his class an absolute prerequisite for obtaining a passing grade. We had to write a paper in order to complete the course and I did a massive history of the Louisville, KY Courier-Journal that found me in the library microfilm department reading newspapers from the late 1700s. Kentucky has a rich and much misunderstood history and being a "border state" there was a ratio of 2-1 in favor of the North regarding men fighting in the Civil War. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting to further research the state's history. Dr. Clark lived to be at least 100 years old and toward the end of his life, our Alumni Association magazine did a long feature article on him.

  • Although this book was published more than 60 years ago -- and has been updated several times since then -- it is THE PLACE to begin if you are curious about Kentucky's fascinating -- and often tragic -- history. Although "A New History of Kentucky" is more current and is quite good, Clark's book is essential for understanding the Bluegrass State and how it has evolved. Clark's book also gives you a deeper appreciation of "A New History" and helps you understand some of the finer points of that book as well. Clark is a first-rate historian, but he also is a wonderful story-teller as well. He weaves a compelling story about Kentucky as a place full of optimism, corruption, idealism and missed opportunity. He captures some of the commonwealth's more colorful figures without deifying anyone or losing focus. Trying to understand Kentucky without reading Clark is not unlike trying to comprehend Rome without reading Gibbon or England without reading Churchill.