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by Elizabeth Currid-Halkett

ePub The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art, and Music Drive New York City download
Author:
Elizabeth Currid-Halkett
ISBN13:
978-0691128375
ISBN:
0691128375
Language:
Publisher:
Princeton University Press; 1st Edition edition (July 29, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1942 kb
Fb2 file:
1208 kb
Other formats:
lit lrf docx doc
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
507

Currid takes the reader on a concise tour of New York's 150-year history of being a haven and incubator for artists while . Elizabeth Currid's The Warhol Economy raises distinctive policy implications: namely, cities will get bigger payoffs by supporting milieu rather than museum.

Currid takes the reader on a concise tour of New York's 150-year history of being a haven and incubator for artists while offering a healthy reminder for any city interested in sustaining a lively arts scene: culture drives economic growth. -Andrew Brink, CityView. Laws that hurt the clubs are almost as bad as the rising rents that price-out the artists. Tax breaks to corporations make no sense whatever.

Currid-Halkett’s 2007 book The Warhol Economy documents how artists, designers, musicians and other . The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art and Music Drive New York City Princeton: Princeton University Press. Currid-Halkett, E. (2010).

Currid-Halkett’s 2007 book The Warhol Economy documents how artists, designers, musicians and other creative workers are essential to the vibrancy of New York City.

She is the author of three books The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art and Music Drive New York City (Princeton .

Currid-Halkett has spoken about her work to audiences at 92Y Tribeca, Google, Harvard University, Vanderbilt University, among others.

In The Warhol Economy, Elizabeth Currid argues that creative industries like fashion, art, and . The first chapters of The Warhol Economy introduces Currid’s themes and provides a brief explanation of the history of New York City as a cultural center

In The Warhol Economy, Elizabeth Currid argues that creative industries like fashion, art, and music drive the economy of New York as much as-if not more than-finance, real estate, and law. And Which is more important to New York City's economy, the gleaming corporate office-or the grungy rock club that launches the best new bands? If you said "office," think again. The first chapters of The Warhol Economy introduces Currid’s themes and provides a brief explanation of the history of New York City as a cultural center. She provides a great overview on the cultural economy and provides an example that really defends her claims. Which is more important to New York City's economy, the gleaming corporate office-or the grungy rock club that launches the best new bands? If you said "office," think again.

In The Warhol Economy, Elizabeth Currid argues that creative industries like fashion, art, and music drive the economy of New York as much as-if not more than-finance, real estate, and law. And these creative industries are fueled by the social life that whirls around the clubs, galleries, music venues, and fashion shows where creative people meet, network, exchange ideas, pass judgments, and set the trends that shape popular culture.

New York City and primarily Manhattan were chosen as sites for investigation because of the City's high number of nightclubs, and because of the regulatory as well as real estate pressures that are currently affecting the industry. A variety of sources, including personal interviews with nightclub owners and their employees, various government documents, as well as spatial and non-spatial databases, were consulted to formulate conclusions.

Xvi, 258 p. : 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. -242) and index

Xvi, 258 p. -242) and index. Art, culture, and New York City - How it all began : from the rise of the factory to the rise of bling - Becoming creative - The social life of creativity - The economics of a dance floor - Creating buzz, selling cool - The rise of global tastemakers : what it all means for the policymakers.

New York as a global creative hub: A competitive analysis of four theories on world cities.

Princeton University Press, 2008. The geography of buzz: art, culture and the social milieu in Los Angeles and New York. E Currid, S Williams. Journal of Economic Geography 10 (3), 423-451, 2009. New York as a global creative hub: A competitive analysis of four theories on world cities. Economic Development Quarterly 20 (4), 330-350, 2006. How art and culture happen in New York: Implications for urban economic development.

Zimring, Franklin . The City that Became Safe: New York’s Lessons for Urban Crime and its Control, Oxford University Press, 2012. Nearly all remaining readings can be downloaded via Google Scholar via e- Student Evaluation Paper (one-third) The study should be grounded in relevant prior literature – theoretical, empirical and, where relevant, historical. The paper should also discuss policy implications of the results (if any). Indeed, I would be very interested to see if you can use your study to develop a policy proposal relating to economic topics of urban space

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Which is more important to New York City's economy, the gleaming corporate office--or the grungy rock club that launches the best new bands? If you said "office," think again. In The Warhol Economy, Elizabeth Currid argues that creative industries like fashion, art, and music drive the economy of New York as much as--if not more than--finance, real estate, and law. And these creative industries are fueled by the social life that whirls around the clubs, galleries, music venues, and fashion shows where creative people meet, network, exchange ideas, pass judgments, and set the trends that shape popular culture.

The implications of Currid's argument are far-reaching, and not just for New York. Urban policymakers, she suggests, have not only seriously underestimated the importance of the cultural economy, but they have failed to recognize that it depends on a vibrant creative social scene. They haven't understood, in other words, the social, cultural, and economic mix that Currid calls the Warhol economy.

With vivid first-person reporting about New York's creative scene, Currid takes the reader into the city spaces where the social and economic lives of creativity merge. The book has fascinating original interviews with many of New York's important creative figures, including fashion designers Zac Posen and Diane von Furstenberg, artists Ryan McGinness and Futura, and members of the band Clap Your Hands Say Yeah.

The economics of art and culture in New York and other cities has been greatly misunderstood and underrated. The Warhol Economy explains how the cultural economy works-and why it is vital to all great cities.

  • Wonder why New York City is such a great town? Read this book, and you'll understand. The author explores why corporations choose NYC for their employees. I get it, and so should you.

  • A good read to get a general overview of the creative class in NYC

  • She is very knowledgable about her topic.
    But again, the fact that she completely takes out theater and dance out of artistic equation on New York really hurts the overall comprehension.

  • Elizabeth Currid’s Warhol Economy thoroughly explains the intricate concept of culture, art and consumption in New York City. Through personal narratives, qualitative data, and historical events, Currid allows readers to get a critical looking into a new economic paradigm in many cities across the nation. She identifies creative capital as the new urban economy, where class is determined by one’s ability to produce commodities and have them widely accepted as valuable. Borrowing the findings of many noted scholars, such as Richard Florida, Currid describes how a new creative class came to dominating New York’s “Downtown Scene” and contributed to a new cultural economy that had not been seen before.

    Currid’s writing method was simple. She would introduce each chapter with an anecdote, some from her own experiences living in Lower Manhattan, and others from events in history, such as the rise and fall of Jean-Michel Basquiat. In chapter one, for example, she recalls the life of Basquiat, explaining how his creativity in a changing urban economy took him from a artsy vagabond to a rich painter famous painter of his generation. Furthermore, she explains that cultural consumption around the time of Basquiat’s ascension was a new wave of urban economy, where factory and manufacturing in the city was passé. So, Basquiat’s fame, she argues was symptomatic of a changing economy where cultural products like then arts became a lucrative tool in attaining economic success. Currid was also making the argument that the place in which these cultural products were being produced and sold were crucial hubs that would perpetuate the new economic system.

    Throughout the book, Currid argues that Lower Manhattan: the Village, East Village, Lower East Side, and SoHo, were the centers of the new urban economy. She argues that creative people, such as artists, would flock to these centers in order to seek inspiration, social acceptance, a fun time, and a place to comfortably be “creative”. In the second chapter Currid provides another anecdote about the photographer, Maripol and how this photographer would look for the next “hot” style in fashion, not on the runway but in the Lower Manhattan dance clubs. Again, Currid explicitly identifies cultural capital as a driving force of creativity in the urban center, while referencing historical instances that validates her findings. Currid emphasizes her Maripol narrative by giving readers a brief history lesson in the Lower Manhattan art scene. Explaining that political and socialists sentiments were primarily printed in New York’s downtown in the early 20th century, Currid posits that writings of expression became an important commodity to the Lower Manhattan art culture. By bringing up the history of Lower Manhattan, Currid drives home the concept of place being a contributing factor in the creative consumer centers of the city.

    Another interest facet of Warhol Economy is in how it describes the city of New York as an exemplar and outlier from other formerly industrial cities in the United States. Currid makes it plain: New York is not like Detroit or Pittsburgh, and it is quite remarkably different because of its ability to rebound from crisis. Currid claims that New York was able to reinvent itself because of its “human capital”, where individuals engaged in professional services and less standardized production. In a nice way, she explains that New York’s capacity to export cultural products, such as media and film, are in essence leaps and bounds ahead of other formerly industrial cities. Currid intelligently sneaks in graphs to prove her point as well, showing that NYC reigned supreme as having had professional services at the highest percent of their workforce by the year 2000. Further, another graph she rolled out was one that basically proved the Big Apple to have 4 times the concentration of art than any other American City. Graphs proved to be a useful tool in presenting empirical data, as well as breaking up Currid’s sometime repetitive message of how superior New York was in the art scene compared to other American cities.

    Another important aspect of Currid’s work is her vivid description of the “Tastemaker”. Currid describes this creative sect as individuals who serve two large roles: trendsetter and trend consumer. Further, she considers the Tastemaker to be faceless, an unnamed women on the dance floor wearing an outfit off the beaten path, or a person who frequent the nightlife scene, looking for an open gallery, looking for a new experience. These creative Tastemakers are the ones who decide what culture is “cool” and when, they set the trends, and set the styles. Currid ties Tastemakers into her larger argument of creative consumption by explaining their presence as an important tool in networking and economic success in the art world. So without Tastemakers, there would be no Warhol Economy.

    Lastly the notion and age-old saying, “it’s not what you know, but who you know” is used by Currid in order to explain how artists find success from networks and not necessarily merit. She begins chapter 4 by telling a story of how she came to knowing famed clothing designer Marc Jacobs. She begins the tale by talking about being lost in Downtown, New York. She kindly asked a man where Bleeker Street was, looking to find one of Jacobs clothing boutiques. To her surprise, the man happened to be a good friend of Marc’s, and had the capacity to call up Marc to coordinate an interview between her and him for her book. These connections, Currid asserts, are ones that create and continue careers for artists and creative marketers. Being able to find those who can propel your career and offer advice or valuable contacts is the difference between success and mediocrity.

    In sum, in Warhol’s economy the idea-driven person wins. In Warhol’s economy the creative thinker, weird dresser, underground art-dealer wins. However, the opportunity to take advantage of the creative market depends on where a person is located and the time they find themselves in. It is a unique marriage of paradigm and opportunity. New York City served as a stage with which creative minds converged and hustled amid a time of huge money flow. Currid cleverly uses each chapter as an easel, painting a narrative of New York culture and social mobility.

  • Good book but a tad bit tedious. She enlightened me as to how the creative community is a vital economic consideration and not merely a luxurious by-product of economic conditions.

    The general purpose of the book is to introduce the reader to a different view of the creative community's role in economics, its origins, catalysts and catalysts of decline. She de-emphasizes the importance of public policy in breeding the necessary conditions while doing so.

    This is also valuable as a NYC travel guide, a lesson in economics, history and urban planning as well as an index of some of the most interesting names in the NYC creative community.

    That said, unless you were born yesterday or have never spent any time in a city, going to bars, listening to music, reading books and meeting people, some of this information will seem obvious and redundant. People meet people in clubs and bars, we all know that. You're more likely to run into people in a walking city than a driving city, obvious.

    I appreciate her thoroughness, but I think this book could have made drove home its excellent message in a book probably 2/3rds the length of this. A good book, but get the cliff notes.

  • If you're at all a fan of New York City, especially when defined as a cultural mecca, then this is a must read for different reasons than those that The Warhol Economy advertises. An extensive, heady gossip column gone delightfully awry, The Warhol Economy is a book completely infatuated with the city's culture and the industries lying behind it. Fellow New Yorkers and fans of the city and its artistic presence will not be disappointed, and even casual readers will get caught up in her name-dropping passion for the creative denizens of the Big Apple. However, if you're a fan of the artist Andy Warhol, you'll quickly see through the thin veil to realize the author is simply using the artist's name to move copies off the shelves a little more quickly. Very little knowledge or new wisdom involving Warhol is imparted. There is intrinsic value in the above truths, however. First of all, the name Warhol is synonymous with both Pop Art and New York, and, he himself would consider the mention high praise, thinking the concept as being "very pop." Secondly, while the author tends to ramble, loosely relating several familiar topics and famous people to the art and fashion scene of New York, through her chosen verbiage she inadvertently paints a very detailed portrait of the Manhattan collective groupthink. These thought processes are of great value in any timeframe, since as she even points out, "all business is done in New York." Thirdly, such a move to associate her work with Warhol was smart for business, which is really the biggest, if not the only lesson being a resident of New York will teach you.

  • Completely redundant in that she mentioned only a handful of New York City's avante-garde. The book is interesting but limited in its discussion of the subject. Apparently she thinks that Charles and Ray Eames are brothers and that the MMA is now the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art. I wouldn't waste your time, if I were you.