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ePub Southern Evangelicals and the Coming of the Civil War (Studies in American Religion) download

by Edward R. Crowther

ePub Southern Evangelicals and the Coming of the Civil War (Studies in American Religion) download
Author:
Edward R. Crowther
ISBN13:
978-0773476585
ISBN:
077347658X
Language:
Publisher:
Edwin Mellen Pr (November 1, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1170 kb
Fb2 file:
1978 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
872

This work examines the connection between evangelical religious beliefs and antebellum southern culture.

This work examines the connection between evangelical religious beliefs and antebellum southern culture. Evangelical assumptions and ideas seemed not only to justify slavery and patriarchy, but these assumptions made comphrehensable life's mysteries and heartaches. Southerners thus had a moral, as well as a material, investment in their culture. As they came to believe that the Republican Party thretened that investment, the religiously-minded southerners could accept and support secession. This moral ardor underlay much southern martial ardor during the Civil War.

As they came to believe This work examines the connection between evangelical religious beliefs and antebellum southern culture. This moral ardor underlay much southern martial ardor during the Civil Wa. .

Crowther, Edward R. Southern Evangelicals and the Coming of the Civil War. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press . Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 2000. Southern Protestants, Slavery and Secession: A Study in Religious Ideology, 1830-1861. Dissertation: Auburn University, 1986. When Slavery Was Called Freedom: Evangelicalism, Proslavery, and the Causes of the Civil War. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2002. DeBoer, Clara Merritt. Be Jubilant My Feet: African American Abolitionists in the American Missionary Association, 1839-1861. New York: Garland Publishing, 1994.

However, I argue that Civil War writing by privileged women from both the North and the South goes beyond uneasy alliance with . The article deals with the representation of fear in American war novels of the nineteenth century

However, I argue that Civil War writing by privileged women from both the North and the South goes beyond uneasy alliance with normative femininity. The article deals with the representation of fear in American war novels of the nineteenth century. In the second part, I try to apply their findings to the war novels of three nineteenth century authors, James Fenimore Cooper, John W. De Forest and Stephen Crane.

Mississippi Praying: Southern White Evangelicals and the Civil Rights Movement, 1945-1975. Carolyn Renée Dupont. In Reforging the White Republic, Edward Blum writes his first book about the Civil War. Focusing on an issue ignored by many historians, Blum argues that religion played a significant role in unifying white America. Edward Blum also challenges the perceptions of some historians that the war resolved the issues of the Civil War and created a unified America.

Professor Mathews's book is an explanation of what religion meant in the everyday lives of southern whites and blacks. It is indispensable reading not just for those who want to know more about the Old South but for anyone who wants to understand the South today. â?”David Herbert Donald, Harvard University "A major achievementâ?”a magnificently provocative contribution to the understanding of the history of religion in America.

Studies in American Religion. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 8 x . 0 x . 6 Inches.

George Foster Pierce (Sparta, G. 1888), 324;Wade, John . Augustus Baldwin Longstreet: A Study of the Culture of the South (1924; reprint Athens, Ga.

Lincoln's words invite us to consider how evangelical religion shaped American political culture, not only in the . At mid-century one out of every three Americans came within the orbit of the major evangelical churches.

Lincoln's words invite us to consider how evangelical religion shaped American political culture, not only in the immediate context in which they were written-the era of mature party competition between Whigs and Democrats-but in the subsequent decade, the years of the emergent "third party system," when the continuing but southern-oriented Democratic party faced an insurgent, crusading Republican party.

The American Civil War bibliography comprises books that deal in large part with the American Civil War. There are over 60,000 books on the war, with more appearing each month. Authors James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier stated in 2012, "No event in American history has been so thoroughly studied, not merely by historians, but by tens of thousands of other Americans who have made the war their hobby. Perhaps a hundred thousand books have been published about the Civil Wa.

This work examines the connection between evangelical religious beliefs and antebellum southern culture. Evangelical assumptions and ideas seemed not only to justify slavery and patriarchy, but these assumptions made comphrehensable life's mysteries and heartaches. Southerners thus had a moral, as well as a material, investment in their culture. As they came to believe that the Republican Party thretened that investment, the religiously-minded southerners could accept and support secession. This moral ardor underlay much southern martial ardor during the Civil War. Rather than treat religion as purely a set of formal rituals or as membership in a church, this work treats the religious assumptions, rituals and symbols as a part of culture.