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ePub At Freedom's Door: African American Founding Fathers and Lawyers in Reconstruction South Carolina download

by James L. Underwood,W. Lewis Burke,Eric Foner

ePub At Freedom's Door: African American Founding Fathers and Lawyers in Reconstruction South Carolina download
Author:
James L. Underwood,W. Lewis Burke,Eric Foner
ISBN13:
978-1570033575
ISBN:
1570033579
Language:
Publisher:
Univ of South Carolina Pr (August 1, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1168 kb
Fb2 file:
1821 kb
Other formats:
doc azw lrf mbr
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
317

At Freedom's Door book.

At Freedom's Door book. Start by marking At Freedom's Door: African American Founding Fathers And Lawyers In Reconstruction South Carolina as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

At Freedom's Door African American Founding Fathers and Lawyers in. .This book makes a contribution that extends beyond the history of Reconstruction (or African Americans).

At Freedom's Door African American Founding Fathers and Lawyers in Reconstruction South Carolina. At Freedom's Door rescues from obscurity the identities, images, and long-term contributions of black leaders who helped to rebuild and reform South Carolina after the Civil War. In seven essays, the contributors to the volume explore the role of African Americans in government and law during Reconstruction in the Palmetto State.

Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2000. South Carolina's Reconstruction experience was more radical than that of any other southern state. Yet, as many historians of Reconstruction tend to focus their attention on why Reconstruction failed, many of the most important aspects of the South Carolina experience have been neglected. The essays in At Freedom's Door are therefore part of an ongoing conversation among Reconstruction historians as we try and recapture that wonderful moment when America discovered for the first time biracial democracy.

LEWIS BURKE is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the University of South Carolina School of Law. His books include At Freedom’s Door: African American Founding Fathers and Lawyers in Reconstruction South Carolina. Series: Southern Legal Studies Ser. Hardcover: 368 pages. Publisher: University of Georgia Press (July 1, 2017).

African American Founding Fathers and Lawyers in Reconstruction South Carolina. South Carolina had more black officials (315) than any other state during Reconstruction because it had the largest black population. Indeed, at one point in the 1870s South Carolina had six black congressmen, a figure that hasn’t been matched since. Many of these men however, died embittered, impoverished, or both. Richard Greener, for example, was the first black professor at the University of South Carolina.

Author: James L. Underwood, W. Lewis Burke, Eric Foner. This work seeks to rescue from obscurity the identities and contributions of black leaders who helped to rebuild South Carolina after the Civil War. It demonstrates the legal acumen displayed by prominent African Americans and their impact on the enactment of substantial constitutional reforms. Download At Freedom's Door: African American Founding Fathers and Lawyers in Reconstruction South Carolina by James L. Lewis Burke, Eric Foner free.

Find nearly any book by James Lowell Underwood. by James Lowell Underwood, W. Lewis Burke J. Eric Foner. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. At Freedom's Door: African American Founding Fathers and Lawyers in Reconstruction South Carolina (Non Series). ISBN 9781570035869 (978-1-57003-586-9) Softcover, University of South Carolina Press, 2005.

His past books include four volumes on the Constitution of South Carolina and At Freedom’s Door: African American Founding Fathers and Lawyers in Reconstruction South Carolina.

James Lowell Underwood is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Constitutional Law at the University .

James Lowell Underwood is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Constitutional Law at the University of South Carolina, School of Law. He is the author of a four-volume history of South Carolina’s constitutions and of several works on federal legal practice.

Book by James L. Underwood, W. Lewis Burke, Eric Foner
  • The history study of the black legislators leading the way to new freedom is very well done, very thorough, as one would expect of the group of fine historians under the supervision of a law school dean to be. I myself enjoy studying and writing about those black men because I cannot forget how I felt when I learned who the founders of Aiken County back in 1871 were all black men! My six children went all through Aiken High School without reading, hearing, or learning anything at all about those men. There was the Black Prince, Prince Rivers, who had been in Higginson's black infantry in the Union Army, provost marshal of all Beaufort, later Brigadier Geneneral of the Black Militia and then The S.C.National Guard. And there was Sam Lee, Lawyer, Speaker of the S.C. house, the founder of the Law school at the University of South Carolina. There is plenty of interesting data about other black men who risked their lives to win freedom, only to have that door slammed shut tightly with the election of Wade Hampton as the white artistocrat governor of South Carolina. This is a good piece of work, though it does rely too much on the "history" as written by the white power seekers of the time of Reconstruction.

  • This is a bitter-sweet book that should go far in convincing people of all races of the existence of a cadre of educated and capable progressive Black people in South Carolina during reconstruction. The sadness is that the white power structure extinguished this at the end of Reconstuction with a segregated Jim Crow society unseen before in South Carolina. This book will go far to extinguish the myth of crude unschooled Blacks manipulated by northern carpetbaggers to "rule" the state after the Civil War. The African-Americans who were able to gain a foothold on the American Dream during this period were to become the nucleus of the civil rights movemement in the US. Given a less pig headed white power structure, racial tensions of the past century might have been avoided.