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ePub Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico download

by Simon J. Ortiz,Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

ePub Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico download
Author:
Simon J. Ortiz,Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
ISBN13:
978-0806138336
ISBN:
0806138335
Language:
Publisher:
University of Oklahoma Press (September 14, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1946 kb
Fb2 file:
1432 kb
Other formats:
azw docx lit mbr
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
533

Dunbar-Ortiz graduated from San Francisco State College in 1963, majoring in History. It was followed by two other books: Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico (1980) and Indians of the Americas: Human Rights and Self-Determination (1984).

Dunbar-Ortiz graduated from San Francisco State College in 1963, majoring in History. She began graduate study in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley but transferred to the University of California, Los Angeles completing her doctorate in history in 1974.

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Ortiz, Roxanne Dunbar. Indians of North America - New Mexico - Land tenure - History, Land tenure - New Mexico - History, Mexican Americans - New Mexico - History. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;.

SIMON J. ORTIZ, Regents Professor of.My dissertation was on the history of land tenure in New Mexico, and during 1978–1981 I was visiting director of Native American studies at the University. ORTIZ, Regents Professor of English and American Indian Studies, Arizona State University. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz writes a masterful story that relates what the Indigenous peoples of the United States have always maintained: against the settler US nation, Indigenous peoples have persevered against actions and policies intended to exterminate them, whether physically, mentally, or intellectually. My dissertation was on the history of land tenure in New Mexico, and during 1978–1981 I was visiting director of Native American studies at the University of New Mexico.

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Simon J Ortiz. In New Mexico-once a Spanish colony, then part of Mexico-Pueblo Indians and descendants of Spanish- and Mexican-era settlers still think of themselves as distinct peoples, each with a dynamic history. At the core of these persistent cultural identities is each group's historical relationship to the others and to the land, a connection that changed dramatically when the United States wrested control of the region from Mexico in 1848.

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother. Two more scholarly books followed: "Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico" and "Indians of the Americas: Human Rights and Self-Determination. Her historical memoir, "Red Dirt: Growing Up Okie," tells that story. In 1981, Roxanne was invited to visit Sandinista Nicaragua to appraise the land tenure situation of the Mískitu Indians in the isolated northeastern region of the country.

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Black & White Illustrations.

An updated edition of a seminal work on the history of land ownership in the Southwest

In New Mexico―once a Spanish colony, then part of Mexico―Pueblo Indians and descendants of Spanish- and Mexican-era settlers still think of themselves as distinct peoples, each with a dynamic history. At the core of these persistent cultural identities is each group’s historical relationship to the others and to the land, a connection that changed dramatically when the United States wrested control of the region from Mexico in 1848.

In Roots of Resistance―now offered in an updated paperback edition―Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz provides a history of land ownership in northern New Mexico from 1680 to the present. She shows how indigenous and Mexican farming communities adapted and preserved their fundamental democratic social and economic institutions, despite losing control of their land to capitalist entrepreneurs and becoming part of a low-wage labor force.

In a new final chapter, Dunbar-Ortiz applies the lessons of this history to recent conflicts in New Mexico over ownership and use of land and control of minerals, timber, and water.

  • This, along with the author's "Indigenous People of the United States" and Howard Zinn's "People's History of the United States," should be required reading for all school children. It is about time people understand how we got where we are in an inclusive manner and not with the time worn text books provided in the schools.

  • This book is probably a staple for anyone interested in the history and problems associated with Native American, Hispanic and "Anglo" land ownership in New Mexico. It's an academic treatment... the writing is a bit dry for my taste... but it's well researched and the information is put together well and informative.

  • Written as a thesis, this book shows thorough research and hard work by the author. She discusses the subject from the Native American point of view which hadn't been done before. It is interesting, but only those with an intense interest in the subject should buy.