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ePub California Conquered: The Annexation of a Mexican Province, 1846-1850 download

by Neal Harlow

ePub California Conquered: The Annexation of a Mexican Province, 1846-1850 download
Author:
Neal Harlow
ISBN13:
978-0520066052
ISBN:
0520066057
Language:
Publisher:
University of California Press; First edition (April 14, 1989)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1159 kb
Fb2 file:
1757 kb
Other formats:
azw mobi lrf lit
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
747

30. California by SeaAlien Advances.

30. Neal Harlow was on the staffs of the Bancroft Library, the California State Library, and the library of UCLA; he was Head Librarian at the University of British Columbia for a decade and was Dean of the Graduate School of Library Service, Rutgers University, from 1961 to 1969.

California Conquered book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

California Conquered book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking California Conquered: The Annexation of a Mexican Province, 1846-1850 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This book began as a venture to collect official and unofficial documents relating to the interval of American military rule. There proved to be thousands, the writings of Presidents, executive officers, and congressmen, naval and military personnel, governors, settlers, and citizens-routine, familiar, wheedling, seductive, blustering, commanding. As the quantity grew, they seemed eager to be heard. But the documents exhibit the traits of their makers.

California Conquered: Th. .has been added to your Cart

California Conquered: Th.has been added to your Cart. Harlow supersedes everyone else who has written about the invasion and occupation by the US because he summarizes the literature of the field, treats the story in great detail, keeps the narrative straights, and deftly weaves a large number of quotations into the text to allow the characters to speak for themselves. The book is, therefore, a mine of information about the end of the Mexican and the beginning of the American er. -Choice.

Militiamen from south of the Bay, led by Mexican Captain Joaquin de la Torre, had . Harlow, Neal (1982). California Conquered: The Annexation of a Mexican Province 1846–1850.

Militiamen from south of the Bay, led by Mexican Captain Joaquin de la Torre, had joined with Padilla's irregulars and now numbered about seventy. Ford's men positioned themselves in a grove of trees and opened fire when the enemy charged on horseback, killing one and wounding another. During the ensuing long-range battle, William Todd and his companion escaped from the house where they were being held and ran to the Bears. Rogers, Fred Blackburn (1962).

California Conquered : War and Peace on the Pacific, 1846-1850. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780520044302. Release Date:September 1982.

Military Governments in California, 1846–1850. Arthur C. Clark & C. 1963. Yale University Press, 2008. California Conquered: The Annexation of a Mexican Province. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1982. Pedro Pino: Governor of Zuni Pueblo, 1830–1878. Logan: Utah State University Press, 2003. Hawgood, John A. America’s Western Frontiers: The Exploration and Settlement of the Trans-Mississippi West. New York: Knopf, 1967. Haynes, Sam W. James K. Polk and the Expansionist Impulse.

California - History - 1846-1850. Berkeley : University of California Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Excellent, in-depth history of the formation of California as a territory, up to its first Constitution in 1849. calbookaddict Feb 26, 2008.

Subtitle: the annexation of a Mexican province, 1846-1850 .

Publisher: University of California Press, ISBN: 0520066057. Includes index - Previously published as: California conquered : war and peace on the Pacific, 1846-1850 - "First paperback printing" - Bibliography: p. -445.

This book began as a venture to collect official and unofficial documents relating to the interval of American military rule. There proved to be thousands, the writings of Presidents, executive officers, and congressmen, naval and military personnel, governors, settlers, and citizens-routine, familiar, wheedling, seductive, blustering, commanding. As the quantity grew, they seemed eager to be heard. But the documents exhibit the traits of their makers. Containing neither the whole truth nor nothing but the truth, they offer many-sided versions of what people believed or wanted others to accept; they must be taken with a grain of salt. Long, sometimes garbled, and always incomplete, the record requires assessment, a referee to appraise the evidence and form his own imperfect conclusions. And any curious or dissenting reader may, by consulting the numerous cited sources, make his own interpretations. References, whenever possible, have been made to materials in some printed form, leading an inquirer to a vast array of historical evidence.  Everything herein happened, or so the record tells, and if an assumption has been made, it is that men, issues, and events can be interesting in their own right, without exaggeration. "To exaggerate," a knowing urban child recently observed, "means you put in something to make it more exciting" (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 10, 1978).
  • Without question the best book I have read on the tranistion period of Califonria's history. The writer brings forth the tension of the relationships between the Californian military commander and the govenor Pio Pico, between Kearny, Fremont and Stockton. It clearly shows the positives and flaws of all the characters that came into play. Very easy to read.

  • A good copy for my reference library. Great detail.

  • I used this text to prepare for a discussion of California annexation during the Mexican-American War. The text was well written and very informative. It provided an excellent basis for our discussion.

  • I am a direct paternal descendant of Jose Vicente Feliz, the first comisionado of El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles. In other words, my fifth great-grandfather was the first mayor of Los Angeles during the Spanish period. For over five generations, our family has passed down the stories of how the conquest of our ancestral lands were conquered by the Army of The West. This account by Harlow most accurately conforms to the family oral histories, which I have heard through the years from my Feliz, Peralta, Yorba, Cota & Lugo relatives. For example, it has long been understood by our family that it was Josef Tomas Feliz (a grandson of Jose Vicente Feliz) who hosted the signing of the treaty of El Campo de Cahuenga between the conquering military and the local city dignataries. Harlow notes that this took place in "the Feliz adobe," while others have omitted that fact. Also, according to our family histories, my second great-grandfather --Manuel Celestino Feliz--was a judge of the Californio period and, this book is detailed enough to report on the conditions of the take-over that placed "the locals" in charge of "their own judicial system" during the crucial years prior to statehood. Moreover, while most other accounts deny that the Mormon Batallion had anything to do with the policing of the locals. Mormon historians, in fact, claim that the Mormon Batallion "did not fire their guns" during their part in the Army of the West. Conversely, Harlow writes that "the Mormons" served during "the occupation" period as a "police" force. Indeed, from the perspective of an Angelino whose family has maintained an oral history of those activities, I can recommend this work as the most accurate of the histories I've read on the period of the conquest of my home state of California.