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ePub The Civil War in Georgia: A New Georgia Encyclopedia Companion download

by John Inscoe,Albert Churella,Angela Elder,Anne Bailey,Anthony Carey,Barton A. Myers,Brad Wood,Brian Brown,Bruce Stewart,Bruce Smith,Caroline Dillman,Chris Wilkinson,Clarence Mohr,Dan Childs,Dan Du,David McGee,David Wiggins,David Williams,Debra van Tuyll,Denise Wright,Diane Trap,Edwin Jackson,Franklin Sammons Jr.,Garrett W. Silliman,George W. Justice,Glenna Schroeder-Lein,Gordon Jones,Heather Whittaker,Hubert H. McAlexander,Hugh Ruppersburg,Jacqueline Carmichael,James Turner,James Welborn III,Jarrod Atchison,Jason Manthorne,Jeffrey Young,John D. Fowler,Jun Hyun,Katherine Brackett,Katherine Rohrer,Keith S. Bohannon,Kevin Young,Kyle Osborn,Laura McCarty,Laverne Hill,Leah Richier,Levi Collins,Lisa Frank,Melvin Hill Jr.,Robert Wilson III,Robert Scott Davis Jr.,Samuel McGuire,Sean Vanatta,Stephen Davis,Stephen Huggins,Steve Longcrier,Susan O'Donovan,Vanessa Tome,William Bragg,Richard Houston,Cindy Schmid

ePub The Civil War in Georgia: A New Georgia Encyclopedia Companion download
Author:
John Inscoe,Albert Churella,Angela Elder,Anne Bailey,Anthony Carey,Barton A. Myers,Brad Wood,Brian Brown,Bruce Stewart,Bruce Smith,Caroline Dillman,Chris Wilkinson,Clarence Mohr,Dan Childs,Dan Du,David McGee,David Wiggins,David Williams,Debra van Tuyll,Denise Wright,Diane Trap,Edwin Jackson,Franklin Sammons Jr.,Garrett W. Silliman,George W. Justice,Glenna Schroeder-Lein,Gordon Jones,Heather Whittaker,Hubert H. McAlexander,Hugh Ruppersburg,Jacqueline Carmichael,James Turner,James Welborn III,Jarrod Atchison,Jason Manthorne,Jeffrey Young,John D. Fowler,Jun Hyun,Katherine Brackett,Katherine Rohrer,Keith S. Bohannon,Kevin Young,Kyle Osborn,Laura McCarty,Laverne Hill,Leah Richier,Levi Collins,Lisa Frank,Melvin Hill Jr.,Robert Wilson III,Robert Scott Davis Jr.,Samuel McGuire,Sean Vanatta,Stephen Davis,Stephen Huggins,Steve Longcrier,Susan O'Donovan,Vanessa Tome,William Bragg,Richard Houston,Cindy Schmid
ISBN13:
978-0820341385
ISBN:
082034138X
Language:
Publisher:
University of Georgia Press (September 1, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Americas
ePub file:
1279 kb
Fb2 file:
1431 kb
Other formats:
lit doc mbr rtf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
714

Most of the significant battles that occurred in Georgia get a chapter; however, disappointingly, very few maps are provided to clarify the maneuvers.

Most of the significant battles that occurred in Georgia get a chapter; however, disappointingly, very few maps are provided to clarify the maneuvers. Supporting institutions such as hospitals, manufacturing facilities, railroads, newspapers, and prisons primarily located in Georgia’s main cities are recognized.

Georgians, like all Americans, experienced the Civil War in a variety of ways

Georgians, like all Americans, experienced the Civil War in a variety of ways. Through selected articles drawn from the New Georgia Encyclopedia (ww. eorgiaencyclopedia. org), this collection chronicles the diversity of Georgia’s Civil War experience and reflects the most current scholarship in terms of how the Civil War has come to be studied, documented, and analyzed. A Project of the New Georgia Encyclopedia; Published in Association with the Georgia Humanities Council and the University System of Georgia/GALILEO. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The Civil War In Georgia: A New Georgia Encyclopedia Companion. Rainy Night In Georgia By Chris Young Cover. John Inscoe, Albert Churella, Angela Elder, Anne Bailey, Anthony Carey, Barton A. Myers, Brad Wood, Brian Brown, Bruce Stewart, Bruce Smith, Caroline Dillman, Chris Wilkinson, Clarence Mohr, Dan Childs, Dan Du, David McGee, David Wiggins, David Williams, Debra van Tuyll, Denise Wright, Diane Trap, Edwin Jackson, Franklin Sammons J. Garrett W. Silliman, George W. Justice, Glenna Schroeder-Lein, Gordon Jones, Heather Whittaker, Hubert.

In commemoration of the Civil War sesquicentennial, the collaborative partners of the online New Georgia Encyclopedia (ww. eorgiaencyclopedia

In commemoration of the Civil War sesquicentennial, the collaborative partners of the online New Georgia Encyclopedia (ww.

Through selected articles drawn from the New Georgia Encyclopedia (ww. org), this collection chronicles the diversity of Georgia's Civil War experience and reflects the most current scholarship in terms of how the Civil War has come to be studied, documented, and analyzed

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Georgia was one of the original seven slave states that formed the Confederate States of America in February 1861, triggering the . Civil War. The state governor, Democrat Joseph E. Brown, wanted locally raised troops to be used only for the defence of Georgia, in defiance of Confederate president Jefferson Davis, who wanted to deploy them on other battlefronts.

The New York Times Best Seller list is widely considered the preeminent list of best-selling books in the United States. But with Bear's status as a new Seelie Prince and marriage to Slaine, Ivy's battle plans could put her at odds with those she loves most. Ivy has vowed to win her kingdom back, but at what cost? The Glass Scepter. Life for Ivy Hawthorne has changed overnight.

In Writing History with Lightning, Matthew Hulbert and John Inscoe assemble an all-star cast of scholars to explore a century of filmmaking about nineteenth-century America.

Although Albert Johnston was born in Kentucky, he lived much of his life in. .

Although Albert Johnston was born in Kentucky, he lived much of his life in Texas, which he considered his home. He was first educated at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, where he met fellow student Jefferson Davis. East Tennessee (a heavily pro-Union region of the South during the Civil War) was held for the Confederacy by two unimpressive brigadier generals appointed by Jefferson Davis: Felix Zollicoffer, a brave but untrained and inexperienced officer, and soon-to-be Maj. Gen.

Georgians, like all Americans, experienced the Civil War in a variety of ways. Through selected articles drawn from the New Georgia Encyclopedia (www.georgiaencyclopedia.org), this collection chronicles the diversity of Georgia’s Civil War experience and reflects the most current scholarship in terms of how the Civil War has come to be studied, documented, and analyzed.

The Atlanta campaign and Sherman’s March to the Sea changed the course of the war in 1864, in terms both of the upheaval and destruction inflicted on the state and the life span of the Confederacy. While the dramatic events of 1864 are fully documented, this companion gives equal coverage to the many other aspects of the war―naval encounters and guerrilla war­fare, prisons and hospitals, factories and plantations, politics and policies― all of which provided critical support to the Confederacy’s war effort. The book also explores home-front conditions in depth, with an emphasis on emancipation, dissent, Unionism, and the experience and activity of African Americans and women.

Historians today are far more conscious of how memory―as public commemoration, individual reminiscence, historic preservation, and literary and cinematic depictions―has shaped the war’s multiple meanings. Nowhere is this legacy more varied or more pronounced than in Georgia, and a substantial part of this companion explores the many ways in which Georgians have interpreted the war experience for themselves and others over the past 150 years. At the outset of the sesquicentennial these new historical perspectives allow us to appreciate the Civil War as a complex and multifaceted experience for Georgians and for all southerners.

A Project of the New Georgia Encyclopedia; Published in Association with the Georgia Humanities Council and the University System of Georgia/GALILEO.

  • Very good, highlights little known battle fields.

  • This book is extremely well researched and gives the reader a fuller, deeper, and more expansive view of the War and it effects on Georgia. One of the best well rounded full experience reads on the subject. From war front to home front its a wonderful window into the past.

  • It was informative but not everything the description said.

  • An excerpt from the review on StrategyPage.Com:

    "Prof. Inscoe (Georgia), author of Mountain Masters: Slavery and the Sectional Crisis in Western North Carolina and Race, War, and Remembrance in the Appalachian South, divides the book into three broad sections, "Prelude to War", "The War Years", and "The War's Legacy". Each section is further divided into several sub-sections; "The War Years", for example, includes "Military Actions," "Military Support," and "The Home Front". These subsections are filled with short essays or side-bars on a variety of subjects written by various specialists. The result is a total of over 70 discussions or profiles on subjects such as "Georgia in 1860", "Andrews Raid", "Battle of Resaca", "Sherman's March to the Sea", "Confederate Veterans' Organizations", "Unionists", "Slave Narratives", "Cemeteries", "Women", and so forth. Although occasionally some essays have a "Lost Cause" resonance, on the whole they are even-handed, and in many cases even ground breaking, such as the suggestion that operations by Confederate irregulars in the state may have caused more harm than Sherman's alleged depredations. "

    For the balance of the review, see StrategyPage.Com

  • This book is a collection of about 70 articles culled from the website of the New Georgia Encyclopedia that pertain to the Civil War in Georgia. The articles are grouped as Prelude to War, The War Years, and The War’s Legacy, but are so short that the book is perhaps best viewed as a “sampler” of the Civil War. The book is intended to give a flavor and a feel to the Civil War in Georgia, but is inadequate for a deeper understanding of the Civil War.

    Most of the significant battles that occurred in Georgia get a chapter; however, disappointingly, very few maps are provided to clarify the maneuvers. Supporting institutions such as hospitals, manufacturing facilities, railroads, newspapers, and prisons primarily located in Georgia’s main cities are recognized. In addition, the situation for unionists, deserters, dissenters, women, and slaves are described.

    As this collection makes evident, control of the memories of the Civil War has always been very important to Southerners. Various cities, sites, organizations, activities, books, films, etc have sought to favorably depict the Civil War dating from its conclusion to the present day. In particular, the so-called “lost cause” theme is often advanced. According to this idea, the Confederacy was a gallant cause waged by honorable men to fend off the depredations of unscrupulous Yankees. Slavery, according to them, was a benign part of Southern life that Yankee invaders destroyed. Some of the articles are critical of this idea, but others are accepting.

    In many ways the book and the online site are exasperating in their neutrality and passivity to the realities of the South, the Civil War, and slavery. One article in the first section claims that the Civil War was “very much a political war,” that occurred due to political failure. What is not said, is that “fire-eating” Southern social and economic elites drove the political process. America has never figured how to give average citizens a meaningful voice in the political process. An article on Reconstruction scarcely mentions the incredible violence perpetrated on blacks and sympathizers, which continued through several decades of Jim Crow. One author amazingly suggests that blacks and whites hammered out an agreement about freedom after the War.

    The book is no more than a very minimalist introduction to the Civil War. Some of the places and organizations that remember the Civil War are not found in traditional histories, so may be useful. To learn about the Civil War and its aftermath such books such as David Potter’s The Impending Crisis, James McPherson’s Battle Cry of Freedom, and Eric Foner’s Reconstruction must be consulted.